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Almost time to start thinking about making a mason jar full of my annual BBQ sauce. I try and make a quart around Easter and that will last me all summer. Anybody else make your own sauce?
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Recipe? Or is it a secret?

No, I don't make my own (yet). I buy it from a local BBQ joint that is one of the best BBQ places I've ever been. It's a local place, no chain. Though he does own a second shop (also local). It was featured on that Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives show a few years ago. I like his original place better.
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Almost time to start thinking about making a mason jar full of my annual BBQ sauce. I try and make a quart around Easter and that will last me all summer. Anybody else make your own sauce? - jamesmw

------------------------

Ever since I got my offset smoker I have been using a dry rub. But back in the day when all I had and used was my Weber grill, I made my own BBQ sauce and it was pretty damn good.

In a 2 quart sauce pan on low heat I put in a 32 oz bottle of ketchup, rinsed the ketchup bottle with about a cup of water and added that to thin the ketchup a little, about a half a cup of lemon juice (more juice equals more tangy), about a half a cup of worcestershire sauce and a stick (1/4 lb) of butter. I let that simmer until the butter was melted then I added the spices, lots of garlic powder, some onion powder and some course ground black pepper. The black pepper adds the heat and I made mine on the hot side for me but toned it down for company.
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Recipe? Or is it a secret?


Steven Raichlen BBQ sauce and Rub
May 31, 2011 at 3:57pm
Steven Raichlen rub and sauce
1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1/4 cup sweet paprika
3 tablespoons black pepper
3 tablespoons coarse salt
1 tablespoon hickory smoked salt or more coarse salt ( I add a few drops of liquid smoke to kosher salt warmed in a cast iron skillet)
2 teaspoons garlic powder
2 teaspoons onion powder
2 teaspoons celery seeds
1 teaspoons cayenne pepper
Combine all the ingredients in a mixing bowl and stir to mix. (Actually, your hands work
better for mixing than a spoon or whisk does. Use your fingers to break up any lumps of
brown sugar.) Store the rub in an airtight jar away from heat or light; it will keep for at least
6 months.
Basic Barbecue Sauce
Makes about 2 ½ cups
2 cups ketchup
¼ cup cider vinegar
¼ cup Worcestershire sauce
¼ cup firmly packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons prepared mustard
1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
1 tablespoon of your favorite barbecue rub
2 teaspoons liquid smoke
½ teaspoon black pepper
mix and bring to simmer, transfer to glass mason jar with plastic lid
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No. of Recommendations: 4
I buy the large bottle of generic BBQ sauce ( sweet baby ray, KC masterpiece, etc) and modify it to suit the Q.

1 cup BBQ Sauce
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/4 tsp cayenne
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
dash Worcester sauce
some water to thin it a little

I'll add or subtract soy, mustard, celery salt, onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne, paprika, cumin, etc, depending on the type of meat.

We go heavier on the vinegar for pork sauce, celery for chicken and lamb.

...in a hurry we zap it in the microwave.

... not in a hurry, put it in a tin can and smoke it with the meat.
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Recipe? Or is it a secret?

One or three of us have shared our homemade recipes in years past. And, they're listed on That Web Site, over there, to the right...--->

No, I don't make my own (yet). I buy it from a local BBQ joint that is one of the best BBQ places I've ever been.

Not a bad idea. I never thought about doing that myself until my B-I-L told me that his "secret pulled-pork-mop-sauce" was purchased from a local BBQ joint. He liked their stuff so much that he bought "their stuff" and didn't have to worry about making his own. And, he (and his buddy) was (and still are) well known around his (their) local community for his (their) pulled pork.

There are, obviously, NUMEROUS BBQ sauce recipes Online these days. Searching through them all can easily make one's head swim.

Try to make it easy on yourself. Start with; What kind of sauce do you like?

Sweet or spicy?

Thick or thin?

Tomato based?

Mustard based?

Vinegar based?

And, then think about what kind of meat that you're BBQ'ing? That by itself might change what type of sauce you might wish to use.

I wanted a BBQ sauce for pulled pork. I looked at, and tried a few different recipes before I settled on the one I've been using for a coupla years now...

http://www.bbqfools.com/blford.php#ModifiedCarolinaStyleBarb...

And, umm, that's not "exactly" what I use today since I've tweaked it a coupla times since then and the Rub recipe I use has never been posted publicly. So...it's partially a "secret recipe" for the whole kit-and-kaboodle.

However, what I have offered for the sauce is purty danmed good...And, so says a coupla people over the years...Including my B-I-L, my sister and their two kids...The "rest of the family" liked my recipe better'n Dad's. :-)

But, again, you need to decide what "kind" of sauce you want for a particular type of meat. And, then...tweak it. Have fun. Don't sweat it.

Good luck!

Or, maybe just stick with buying that goody stuffs y'all already are buying, and...Enjoy!! :-)

Bill
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Never occurred to me to check the FAQ. Not sure I ever saw that before! Lots of info over there.

We're always game to try making stuff ourselves. 1poorlady recently made some pit beans that were awesome. As good as our favorite BBQ joint.

For the record, I like a sauce that is sweet with a little kick to it (not too much, but a bit), medium thickness, tomato-based.

Yeah, there are so many recipes out there it's difficult to sort them all out. Which is why when someone says "I have a homemade sauce" my ears perk up. I can get Steve Raichlen's sauce, but it's different when someone I actually communicate with says "this one is good". Ya know what I mean?

1poorguy (have TWO books by Raichlen).
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No. of Recommendations: 5
FWIW, I use whatever is on sale (Kraft, Sweet Baby Ray’s, etc.) and modify it to my taste. Recently DW has been having health problems that has altered her taste in foods. She don’t like too much spice, etc. so I have been feeding her raw oyster as a starter for supper the last couple of moons. I makes up a half pint of my “easter sauce”, takes a teaspoon out and mix it with a udder teaspoon in the or 3 of ketchup in a small dish for her. The problem is getting raw oysters in the shell here on the “Nortshore”. Before the BP oil spill, we had Bill’s Oyster House about 15 or 12 miles away as the buzzards fly. After the spill, Bill, who was in his late 70s at the time, decided to hang it up and closed. I was at the “Shrimp Lot” in “Wego” (https://www.yelp.com/biz/westwego-shrimp-lot-westwego) to see if anyone had live crabs for a reasonable price and noticed one guy was advertising oysters so I axed him “How much fur a half sack?" He told me $28 so I bought them. They were good but not what I calls a half sack, no.

Next I called Mandeville Seafood and axed them. They wanted $52 fur a half sack. When I got them home and counted them, I calculated that they cost me something over $12/dozen. O.K., time to get serious. I went to P & J’s in N’Orleans (http://oysterlover.com/index.html) and talked at them. They would sell me a “mini sack”, which was a bit over 7 dozen for $50. I told them about my experience in Mandeville and told them “Fur over $12/dozen, I expects them to clean and peel them fur me and include the makings fur sauce and crackers to eats them on.” That cracked them up, yes.

Anyhow. To make a long story a little longer, on Monday I called them to order a half sack and the guy taking my order thought I said a half gallon (shelled). When I got there was no oysters in the shell available. They told me that there was a truck on the way and would be there in about an hour or two. Since it is about a 100-mile round trip plus a $5.00 toll, I told them I’ll be back in a hour or so. I got back and watched them unload the truck and bought the first sack from the first pallet. I had axed them if a full sack would fit into a 48 quart ice chest and they tole me no. I tole them no major problem, I gots my old Igloo (that I bought in the 80s along wid a new one. They put a couple shovels of ice in the bottom of each, put 2/3 of the sack in the new one, the rest in the Igloo and covered them boat wid ice. FYI, a full sack weighs bout 100 pounds. I figures I gots nuff ersters fur da next month or so. I was at the Rouse’s Supermarket yesterday and picked up a bottle of Drago's Charbroiling Sauce on sale for $6.49. I know their recipe but figures on trying to grill them using their stuff.
;-)

Back in the 80s & 70s, I used to make chili for my parents in darkest Noo Joisey. My mother didn’t want it spicy and the rest of us liked it with some “heat” so I mixed up a spice mixture to add for the rest of us. I might hafta do that with DW for my chile verde .
;-)

C.J.V. - had grilled lamb “tacos” last night after the oysters, us
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Which is why when someone says "I have a homemade sauce" my ears perk up.

Do you like hot sauce? My latest hobby is making fermented hot sauce from various hot peppers. It is very easy to do. I like it so much better than the store bought stuff.

PSU
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If there's good flavor, and not just *hot*, yeah. I like it. If you can't taste the chiles because your mouth is on fire then I don't see the point. But that's me. A good hot sauce adds flavor AND heat.

1poorguy (we gots lots of hot sauces in AZ...I've even tried one made from ghost chiles...too much for me)
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If there's good flavor, and not just *hot*, yeah. I like it. If you can't taste the chiles because your mouth is on fire then I don't see the point. But that's me. A good hot sauce adds flavor AND heat.

The nice thing about this new hobby is that you can control the heat and flavor. Using milder hot peppers if you don't want as much heat. Add garlic or carrots to add other flavors. It's a very simple process - just need peppers, water, and salt for the fermentation and vinegar for the final product. You also need time. It takes several weeks to ferment.

I made a cayenne pepper sauce that to me was way better than Frank's Hot Sauce.

PSU
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I have a pico de gallo I sometimes make. Dead easy. Tomatoes, onions, jalapenos, cilantro, garlic, green pepper, lemon juice, a bit of salt. You can eat it right away, or put it in the fridge overnight for the flavors to really meld. I will keep for a week or two in the fridge. No real fermenting, though.

You adjust the heat by the amount of jalapeno you add.

Obviously that has a south-of-the-border slant (as opposed to Cajun or others).
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PSU, I'm interested in this fermented hot sauce you speak of. Got a recipe or directions a simple northerner can follow?

ThyPeace, Wisconsin does sauerkraut, not heat.
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ThyPeace, Wisconsin does sauerkraut, not heat.

Axe-u-lee, the process be similar as sauerkraut. You pack peppers into a barrel, crock, etc. with salt and allow it to “rot” (ferment). After X number of days, weeks, years, etc. you squeeze out the juice and bottle it. That is how they makes Tabasco Sauce down in Avery Island. Of course, from the pepper juice one adds vinegar, citric acid, ascorbic acid xanthan, etc., etc. to taste and keep it from separating.

Most recently, instead of making “sauce” out of the chilies I grow, I’ll dry and powder them. I’ll store the powder in the freezer and use the powder for making stuffed peppers, etc. I personally prefer other brands of pepper sauce than Tabasco, such as Crystal, which is made near N’Orleans. When I went to P & J’s on Monday, they gave me a bottle of their “Gourmet Pepper Sauce”. The ingredients are : water, Habanero and Naga Jolokia chili peppers, carrot, sugarcane vinegar, salt, onion, garlic, lime, acetic and citric acids (acidity regulators), xanthan gum (thickener) and ascorbic acid (antioxidant). It is not a smooth sauce like or Crystal but has pepper seeds and what looks like chunks of onion or garlic in it. Methinks I’ll not open it as I think it’s a bit too hot for my taste, YES.
;-)

C.J.V. - hope it doesn’t eat its way out of the bottle and attack DW or her cats, me
;-)
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PSU, I'm interested in this fermented hot sauce you speak of. Got a recipe or directions a simple northerner can follow?

I'll give you three links to provide some guidance.

https://www.chilipeppermadness.com/recipes/fermented-hot-sau...
https://www.mountainfeed.com/blogs/learn/fermented-hot-sauce...
https://www.feastingathome.com/fermented-hot-sauce-simple-an...

I pretty much follow most of the process at the first link. The part that I don't do is boil the final sauce at the end. They do that although they say you don't have to boil.

The second link has a nice photo of fermentation weights being put on top of the peppers and the next photo shows the jar with a fermentation air lock.

The third link shows how you can use a ziplock bag to hold the peppers below the surface of the brine if you don't want to buy fermentation weights. I would suggest trying it this way the first time to see if you like the final sauce. Also at this link, they show adding carrots to the fermentation. I have not tried this yet.

Since I really this hobby, I decided to invest into some equipment. I bought the following fermentation weights and air locks.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B089N7HTD1/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b...

The above links are good at explaining the process. They all differ a little on the processing. Here is what I do. I strain the fermented peppers through a metal mesh strainer. I strain the brine into a bowl so I can use it for the next step. I place the peppers into my blender. The recipes vary on amount of brine. You may or may not add vinegar. If you add vinegar, you can try apple cider, white, or white wine to name a few. Playing around with various amounts of each is part of the fun.

For my sauce, I add equal amounts of brine and apple cider vinegar. I start with a quarter cup of each and puree the peppers. If I want it thinner, I'll add another quarter cup of each. Once I like the consistency, I strain out the skins and seeds. You don't have to if you like it chunkier. I have found the resulting strained sauce to be too thin for my tastes. So I go back into the strainer, scoop some of the strained skins and seeds, and stir into the sauce to give it a little more body.

For storage, I bought a dozen 5 oz. hot sauce bottles.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01EISFX1K/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b...

The hard part this time of the year is finding fresh peppers to use. I ran around town to find different sources of pepper. It is easy to find jalapenos, serranos and habaneros. I found some thai chilis at a nearby Indian grocery store.

My latest batch that has been fermenting 2 weeks has habaneros, serranos, jalapenos, thai chilis, chile reds, and garlic. The brine is nice and cloudy so it is fermenting nicely. I could process this weekend if I wanted but I may wait another week or two. I have given it to several friends. I said I may refill if they bring me the bottle back. I got them back in a few days.

I tried sauerkraut recently in the quart sized Mason jars. As a kid, we made it every year in large crocks. This first try in glass jars didn't work well. It was way to salty. I used the same brine recipe from my peppers. I need to research more. It could be that it requires less salt.

Maybe I'll give you my homemade bacon recipe some day. I just finished up another 9 lbs batch of it. It requires smoking which is the purpose of this board.

PSU
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It is not a smooth sauce like or Crystal

That's what I put on scrambled eggs.

AC *yum*
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I tried sauerkraut recently in the quart sized Mason jars. As a kid, we made it every year in large crocks. This first try in glass jars didn't work well. It was way to salty. I used the same brine recipe from my peppers. I need to research more. It could be that it requires less salt.

How did you cook it, huuuggh? My father, who was the younger son, was born on a farm in Germany and came to the states (legally) in 1927. Sauerkraut was made to preserve the cabbages that they grew (along with beets, turnips, etc.). In the states, we would buy canned sauerkraut, drain the juice into a glass and then wash it in several changes of water. We would dice up some onion and bacon and “sweat” them in a pot until the onion was starting to brown. The washed kraut was squeezed to remove excess moisture and added to the pot along with some caraway seed or juniper berries, mustard seed, bay leaf, etc. We would add beer or water to the pot and simmer it for around an hour and a half. At that point some of the original juice was added to taste for salt and black pepper was added and allowed to cook for another 15 or 20 minutes. As a variation for the Christmas Eve feast, it was cooked without the bacon but dried mushrooms was added (the day before Christmas was a day one abstained from meat back then in the Roman Catholic faith).
;-)

C.J.V. - never tried fermenting cabbage but did brew my own beer and made my own wine vinegar, me
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How did you cook it, huuuggh?

Our family tradition was to have pork and sauerkraut for New Year's Day. My mother cooked the sauerkraut and pork in one big pot for several hours. Serve with mashed potatoes, some kind of vegetable and horseradish.

PSU
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BALLOOOONS!!!!

AC *Happy Foolversary!*
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Thanks for all the suggestions on the hot sauce. I have successfully made my own sauerkraut (once), so have some idea of how to do an air lock with materials on hand. I did learn that leaving the sauerkraut in the back of the fridge for three months was a bad idea; probably I let some mold get into the jar. It was all just a little toooooo slimey. But the first jar from the same batch was fine, so perhaps it was also just that it had been there too long.

DH seems to think that this is all unnecessary. His digestion does not benefit from fermented foods as much as mine seems to.

ThyPeace, and since dairy and I are not best friends, fermented vegetables are a better choice.
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Never occurred to me to check the FAQ. Not sure I ever saw that before! Lots of info over there.

Many years ago when I first joined this board, The Regulars would have to constantly link back to the FAQ they created and updated several times. I asked for their permission to add it to a web site that I decided to create. They agreed.

THEY did all'a the hard work on that FAQ. I did add a coupla links after the fact, but that's their creation, not mine.

And, the individual BBQFool's pages are all their creations. I only added what I was given permission to add.

They shared a lot of wonderful info on this board and I was happy to be able to share it some more, but I haven't done anything with the web site in a long time.

Still, there is a LOT of good info there. I appreciate the fact that when I'm curious about a particular type of recipe, I might be able to find one that someone I actually know, on this board mind-you, offered. But, it's still better'n wading through hundreds of similar recipes and trying to find one that actually works.

For the record, I like a sauce that is sweet with a little kick to it (not too much, but a bit), medium thickness, tomato-based.

Me too. And, I was surprised when I came across the Carolina Style Mustard BBQ Sauce, tried it, and fell in love with it. Then began tweaking it until I got it to where it is today. And, I just made a double-batch today on the almost-dead-El-Cheapo-grill.

It is sweet, tangy, has a nice after-bite, but does not taste like Yellow Mustard as one might expect. However, it's not tomato either, so...Tweak that derned thang, kick it up a notch and make something spectacular!! That's what cooking is all about, right?

Yeah, there are so many recipes out there it's difficult to sort them all out. Which is why when someone says "I have a homemade sauce" my ears perk up. I can get Steve Raichlen's sauce, but it's different when someone I actually communicate with says "this one is good". Ya know what I mean?

Yes Sir, I do. Hence the reason I started the web site and gathered recipes from the awesome folks on this board. :-)

And, if'n y'all wants a mix of tomato and vinegar with some heat, check out JGBFool's E. 10-SE Reel Hawt BBQ Sauce:

http://www.bbqfools.com/JGBFool.php#E10-SEReelHawtBBQSauce

...have TWO books by Raichlen...

I have one, The BBQ Bible. Circa 1998.

I like it. I've used several recipes from that book.

Wanna check out two others I have and enjoy?

The Grand Barbecue by Doug Worgul. Circa 2006.

Smoke & Spice by Cheryl and Bill Jamison. Circa 2003.

A lot of BBQ history, recipes from different cultures, and overall good stuff. Will I make all'a those recipes? I doubt it. Why? 'Cause The Boss won't eat summa that stuff. *sigh

Bill
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FWIW, I use whatever is on sale (Kraft, Sweet Baby Ray’s, etc.) and modify it to my taste.

Roger that, me too. :-)

Bill
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Which is why when someone says "I have a homemade sauce" my ears perk up.

Do you like hot sauce? My latest hobby is making fermented hot sauce from various hot peppers. It is very easy to do. I like it so much better than the store bought stuff.

PSU


Me too. Been soaking various peppers in various vinegars along with drying out peppers and chopping them up as well.

Bill
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If there's good flavor, and not just *hot*, yeah. I like it. If you can't taste the chiles because your mouth is on fire then I don't see the point.

100% On Point!!

No flavor, just heat? Forget it!

When I'm cooking, I want flavor. A little added heat WITH flavor is an added bonus for me.

Bill
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It takes several weeks to ferment.

Or longer if you really wanna "build up" some flavor.

Grandma used to make a bland chili. I always wanted some hot sauce for added flavor. Since she only made chili once or twice a year, a little bottle of hot sauce would last me a coupla years.

By the time I'd get down to the bottom of the bottle, it'd be brown and thick. OH BOY was it good stuff by then. *grin

Bill
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ThyPeace, Wisconsin does sauerkraut, not heat.

Oh my, I love sauerkraut. The Boss does not. *sigh

Bill
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I've been enjoying the Heinz Kansas City and Memphis BBQ sauces.

AC *and no HFC*
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I use Embasa Chipotle Peppers in Adobo Sauce in my chili. Makes a nice base for the sauce.

AC *not going to reveal anything else*
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Oh my, I love sauerkraut. The Boss does not. *sigh

Not even mine?

AC *knows my kickin' kraut isn't for everyone*
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I personally prefer other brands of pepper sauce than Tabasco, such as Crystal, which is made near N’Orleans.

I'll use Tabasco if that's what's being offered, especially since that's what Grandma always bought for me when she made her mild-chili. By the time I'd get to the bottom of the bottle, it's be a dark brown, with a nice flavor.

However, I've been using Cholula hot sauce for years now because it actually has some flavor to it straight outta the bottle, no extra fermenting time required.

I've seen Crystal hot sauce in the past...way back when. Not sure if I ever tried it or not, but I will now just because of the "rec of a friend." :-)

And, my collection of hot sauces is still fairly large. Some good, others okay, and then there are those I'll use when I run out of the other stuffs.

Bill
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Since this thread has morphed into hot sauce, I thought I would contribute with a hot sauce custom I experienced in Ukraine when I traveled there for a few weeks about 15 years ago.

I went with a Texas buddy who absolutely required hot sauce on damn near everything he ate. Most restaurants had Tabasco and would bring it when asked. I got used to this but the first time when the waiter brought the check, I was surprised there was a line item on it for the Hot Sauce charge.

It seems that Hot Sauce is costly to import to Ukraine so although the restaurants had it, it was not complimentary. They would weigh the bottle before bringing it to the table and weigh again afterwards and then charge you by the gram.

Bars and clubs also sold vodka by the milliliter but that is another story.
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I use Embasa Chipotle Peppers in Adobo Sauce in my chili. Makes a nice base for the sauce.

AC *not going to reveal anything else*


*thhppp!!!!*

Bill
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Oh my, I love sauerkraut. The Boss does not. *sigh

Not even mine?

AC *knows my kickin' kraut isn't for everyone*


She is from New England and doesn't like much of anything with "spices mixed in." *the blanderer, the betterer*

I asked her Momma recently what was wrong with that girl, but she didn't have an answer for me. She said, "In our house, dinner was served. You either ate dinner or you did not. Linda always ate dinner, so..." *shrug*

Mom and I have been sharing recipes, cooking experiences, whatever over the years. We both like a LOT of the same things.

And, I can make two of everything. So, The Boss gets what she wants and I jus' kick mine up a notch. :-)

Bill
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It seems that Hot Sauce is costly to import to Ukraine so although the restaurants had it, it was not complimentary. They would weigh the bottle before bringing it to the table and weigh again afterwards and then charge you by the gram.

Bars and clubs also sold vodka by the milliliter but that is another story.


Oh my, I love it!!

Thanks for sharing Mike!

Bill
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. . . . "In our house, dinner was served. You either ate dinner or you did not. Linda always ate dinner, so..." *shrug*

Sounds like my mother. “You got two choices for dinner.” She would say, “Take it or leave it.” We usually took it but I would usually kick up my portion a notch or three, me.
;-)

C.J.V. - my father & brother would do it too, them
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. . . . "In our house, dinner was served. You either ate dinner or you did not. Linda always ate dinner, so..." *shrug*

Sounds like my mother. “You got two choices for dinner.” She would say, “Take it or leave it.” We usually took it but I would usually kick up my portion a notch or three, me.
;-)

C.J.V. - my father & brother would do it too, them


Grandma made extremely bland foods because Grandpa hated spicy stuffs and also had an ulcer.

She'd make a chili that didn't have a whole lot of flavor to it. I always wanted some hot sauce to help it along and she'd buy a bottle just for me. Since she only cooked chili once or twice a year, by the time I'd be finishing that bottle it'd be well fermented...a nice brown, thick sauce. *yummy

Bill
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Since we're tellin' stories...

1poormom was a terrible cook. She was a great baker (mostly cookies and cakes; from scratch). But she had very few seasonings, and used even less of them. Her meatloaf was the classic loaf of meat with ketchup on the top (ew). Maybe salt and pepper. If she wanted a tomato sauce she started with a can of condensed tomato soup. If you wanted chili, add chili powder. If you wanted not-chili, don't add chili powder. She was raised by a German haus-frau, in middle-America, so it was meat/potatoes/some-overcooked-vegetable with no seasoning.

I learned to cook in grad school because I hated the stuff that I knew how to make**. I learned that I'm not a good cook, but I can follow a recipe. Give me a recipe and I can make a reasonable facsimile of whatever the dish was. Ask me to improvise and you're shooting craps.

1poorlady, on the other hand, just has an intuition. She can look at what we have, open the spice cabinet...pinch of this, dash of that, sprinkle of something else...and it's wonderful. We can never have it again because she doesn't remember (or measure!) what she did.

1poorguy



**Well, I came to hate them. When you have the same four or five dishes over and over it gets really tiresome.
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I learned that I'm not a good cook, but I can follow a recipe. Give me a recipe and I can make a reasonable facsimile of whatever the dish was. Ask me to improvise and you're shooting craps.

Roger that. That's me 110%. It's a 50/50 shot that if I tweak a recipe, it might come out edible. :-)

1poorlady, on the other hand, just has an intuition. She can look at what we have, open the spice cabinet...pinch of this, dash of that, sprinkle of something else...and it's wonderful. We can never have it again because she doesn't remember (or measure!) what she did.

*sigh

Don't I wish.

Bill
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Links may expire, so this is an updated link to anyone wanting to find TMF-ers. The proprietor even opened a food board just for us. :-)

https://discord.gg/Rhr8NMyw
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