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A few years ago, an acquaintance who is an Episcopal priest took a vow of solitude -- not exactly to be a hermit, but to limit her contact with other people to just a short time per day. This is a rare vow and she had to obtain permission from a bishop to take it.

A vow of that sort isn't possible for me, but I find myself now considering becoming (even more of, since I'm probably 90% there already) a hermit, limiting communication with others to the bare minimum needed to survive. Lately everyone irritates me, and worse, I seem to irritate everyone else. I'm still working, but for the past nine or ten months I've worked largely at home and I would have to communicate some for that.
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I'm right there with you Sir or Ma'am. I've been living that was for 25 years. It feels so much more natural to my psychological makeup than interfacing with people just because somehow I'm supposed to "need" to be around people or "do things" with people.
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Maybe I should have stayed with it.


But the counselor was annoying you??

;-)
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I'm probably 90% there already) a hermit, limiting communication with others to the bare minimum needed to survive. Lately everyone irritates me, and worse, I seem to irritate everyone else.

I can relate to this, generally. I’m right in the middle between introvert and extrovert, and this past year of working at home has not been good for me. I find myself missing some people contact, but when I have it, I find people super irritating.

I’m also prone to depression and this can be a sign of depression. I’m probably a little bit depressed but not terribly so.

My only suggestion is you may want to talk to someone about depression before you join a monastery or bite someone’s head off.

Hang in there.
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(consolidating replies)

It feels so much more natural to my psychological makeup than interfacing with people just because somehow I'm supposed to "need" to be around people or "do things" with people.

I'm naturally introverted, but I'm finding that I need more contact with people than I'm getting. Too little contact can (sometimes, not always--my priest friend is probably not at risk of it) lead to unrealistic fears and distrust, like the hoarders (the Collyer brothers, for example) who not only amass junk in their houses, but so much fear that everyone else wants to steal the hoard they they barricade and booby-trap the place.

[to a post that has been deleted; I didn't FA it]

It's always been difficult for me to anticipate others' feelings, and lack of practice for the past 9.5 months seems to have made it worse.

I’m also prone to depression and this can be a sign of depression.

I'm subject to seasonal depression and this is the time of year for it. Last year, at the time it ought to have abated, it collided with pandemic depression, so this has been going on for much longer than I've experienced before.

I use a light box, which helps some, and I'm under medical care.
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I use a light box, which helps some, and I'm under medical care.

New to me. What's a light box?

CNC
... I hope you weren't offended by my attempt at humor. Some days the Fool censors are a bit skittish. And heavy handed.
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New to me. What's a light box?

Used for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Some review of different units:

https://consumertrustedreviews.net/best-sad-lights/?gclid=Cj...

Apparently, they do have a beneficial effect for many people.

Pete
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The easiest part of the pandemic is less time with people. BUT. It's much harder o deal w/mom in the nursing home when I can't visit in person, and I miss my grandchildren terribly. I have seen my children, though--DS came when I broke my leg and required surgery in June, and DD came for another leg surgery in November, so we had long visits. DD tentatively planning to bring the grandkids for their spring vacay in April as we are supposed to have had our covid shots by then.

Since my brother moved out of assisted living into a regular apartment during the pandemic, I went from seeing him never to seeing hime once or twice a week (to bring a home-cooked meal instead of his usual frozen entrees, takeout, delivery). He's entertaining and I enjoy his company.

Most of the time it's just me & the hubster, who has dementia and no longer speaks or understands English. Yesterday I had to stop him from peeing in the kitchen trash can (hey, it has a lid and with the fresh white bag it looks kinda like a white bowl, and I guess he forgot the existence of toilets-), so life remains exciting...

I find boards like TMF provide just about enough socialization for me. I've also had a lot of medical appointments since June, and those brief encounters are pleasant for me. I miss my BFF who moved to another state. Can't wait to resume visits! I think the hubster may have become too difficult to travel with so I may have to wait for people to visit me. (No, I don;t want to put him in a facility, which I can't afford anyway).

I read a lot and listen to podcasts and watch movies, which feels a bit like socializing--and have an active fantasy life, so there's that.

PS--FC! Good to see you! Haven't seen you on the boards in ages.
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I know you miss your g-kids, but I really think cooperating/encouraging a visit is irresponsible. your DD should be hunkering down with her kids at home. Yes, it sucks. But it's the smart thing to do until everyone has had their shots.

And then hope COVID hasn't mutated by then so the shot isn't effective. :-(

1poorguy (chomping at the bit to start traveling, but not getting on a plane or a ship for at least another year; and avoiding people as if they were cobras that will strike if I get too close)
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I didn't know I was anti-social until COVID hit and my life didn't change.

PSU
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"I didn't know I was anti-social until COVID hit and my life didn't change."


Other than not eating out once a week at the Chinese Buffet, and not going to the gym twice a week during the non-swimming months, my life didn't change much other than wearing a mask to the grocery store to buy groceries, either....


But my travel went to near zero as there weren't any events to head to - half a dozen times a year.


t.
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