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This isn't about consumer debt, exactly, but it should be part of everyone's planning.

The creator of this website lost her husband in a car accident. They didn't have wills. She didn't know if he had life insurance. She didn't know how to access his email so she could inform his friends. She didn't know account numbers, or where financial information was located.

In order to help others avoid going through what she went through, she's created a website listing the kind of information people should have.

The article:

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/tragic-death-prompts-unique-f...

And her site:

http://getyourshittogether.org/

Nancy
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And her site:

http://getyourshittogether.org/


Nice idea, however I wonder how many will get blocked as the URL name and site title is considered Not Safe for Work in some corporate circles.

While the title is humorous, I think the information is so valuable that a name without a "four letter word" would have been more appropriate, IMHO.
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While the title is humorous, I think the information is so valuable that a name without a "four letter word" would have been more appropriate, IMHO.

You're certainly free to email her and offer her your thoughts, but I doubt she'd pay much attention at this point.

Nancy
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You're certainly free to email her and offer her your thoughts, but I doubt she'd pay much attention at this point.

That is probably true. I was just stating my opinion, anyone can take it or leave it. I have confirmed that it is blocked from my workplace, so I imagine others clicking the link in the original article might be seeing the same. Looking through the blogs, someone also mentioned that are seeing the same issues with the site and their corporate policy on profanity.

It all depends on what the ultimate goal is for this site. If she stood up a site and is willing to pay the domain and hosting fees out of her own pocket, without a care who goes to it, more power to her.
However, if she's banking on making money through advertisements, donations, and such, she's cut off a segment of the market and it's rather a blunt name for many folks.

Don't take my word for it, the NYT article discusses this exact issue:
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/12/your-money/estate-planning...

Bill Cahill, a lawyer who writes wills for many people who live near me in Brooklyn, said that her legal templates were infinitely better than nothing.

He did lament Ms. Reynolds’s choice of a name for her Web effort. “It seems to me that the whole process deserves more dignity,” he wrote in an e-mail message. While a private admonition to get it together may well be worthwhile, he added, “the coarseness of the communication is not appropriate for the public square.”
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That is probably true. I was just stating my opinion, anyone can take it or leave it.

I agree a different name would allow people to have more access to the site. But it sounded as though she was determined to do it this way. However, if the site is brand=new, maybe some feedback will persuade her to change.

Even if people don't download her templates, just reading about what she went through might cause others to start thinking about what they need to do in case of trouble. My mother rewrote (or rather, had the lawyer rewrite) her will back in May. At the same time, the lawyer redid all the other related documents; durable power of attorney, living will, health care proxy, and so on. We all had a nice little talk with the attorney, and he said how nice we were and so on. We never dreamed the end would come that fast, but Mom had a major stroke in August and died in September. Having all those documents made life infinitely easier for everyone.

Nancy
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I have seen it commonly recommended to have a periodic letter written to one's spouse (or someone else you trust if none) with information in it including where to find money, how accounts are kept, what the passwords are, etc.
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However, if she's banking on making money through advertisements, donations, and such, she's cut off a segment of the market and it's rather a blunt name for many folks

Ironically, the candid title was the reason I decided to click on the link.

Different strokes for different folks I guess.
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I am sure i could find it if i looked, but i have posted before about the document I have with the *important stuff* - that gets updated every year with ALL financial and social account names/numbers & passwords, as well as a note of what bills are paid electronically (all of them), from what accounts, etc...
This includes email & FB
my phone doe not have a password.

Until a couple years ago I mailed a double enveloped copy to my mom as well - just in case GoMC and I are on the same flight that goes down.
As i occasionally change passwords, and mortgages/insurance companies are sold, etc... annual updating is good.
Along with this is a list of "Who it is important to notify" -
including a few people who are NOT on the internet (yes, they still exist)

WHen my dad died (unexpectedly) he had EVERYthing in one place and it was so nice to not have to figure that out.
As a result, as soon as I came home after that, I got it all together.


peace & preparation
t
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I think there's less of a problem between share of knowledge between wife/husband, and a greater issue with aging parents.

In my case, a few years ago my mom wanted to tell me some of where things like her will are - but it was cryptic like - "I have a security box in this closet, the key is in this jewlery box" - but then there was something (maybe her actual will) that I was supposed to go on a scavanger hunt for.

So I've explained A - she needs to write directions down B - she needs somekind of "incapacity" clause/set-up and include information for me like her bank accounts and how to pay condo fees, etc and C - if she does become incapacitate or dies, I need to know exactly how to get to things because I still have my own full-time job - I won't have all the time in the day to deal with her affairs.

But unfortunately there's still been no true sharing.
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I used to keep a typed list of all our accounts and other pertinent information for DH, and would review it all with him about every 6 months. Now that I have everything in Quicken, it is much easier, but I do still maintain a list of the various accounts and access information so nothing is missed. We still sit down about every 6 months to go over everything, but his eyes tend to glaze over about this stuff.

I've now started to prep DD with the same info because I know she'll remember it and be able to help DH if something happens to me. In fact, we are just about to update our estate planning paperwork, and now that the kids will be 22 in April, we are planning on changing the back-up Executor to DD and then DS as whatever is left will be going to them, and they are now old enough and mature enough to be able to handle it.

So besides making sure that all the necessary paperwork and such is in order, I also recommend that people review it regularly or when there are major life changes to make sure it is all up-to-date and reflects the right desires.
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He did lament Ms. Reynolds’s choice of a name for her Web effort. “It seems to me that the whole process deserves more dignity,” he wrote in an e-mail message.

Just to play devil's advocate, if you go out and look for a generic financial planning name there is plenty of stuff out there. I think she is attempting to get people's attention and the course, 'undignified' name is part of that. If it works, she will have achieved her goal.
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I can echo the sentiments in this post. If you haven't had to deal with any of those issues it can be a rude awakening. My wife and I went through a similar situation last fall with my father-in-law and making those decisions after the fact can be a nightmare. We have since met with our accountant, an estate attorney, and our insurance agent to ensure we don't do the same thing to our kids.
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My husband's cousin is going through a horror right now, and Gary and I just hope that they remembered to Get Their S*** Together before he went to Iraq a few years ago, and KEPT it together now that he's employed in a "safe" job like Theater Teacher.

http://boards.fool.com/very-sad-stuff-30566775.aspx
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