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The Biden Family is very "drug friendly".

Sanders rips Biden for praising drug companies at fundraiser
https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/461490-sanders-rips-bi...

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) criticized fellow Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden for praising drug companies at a fundraiser.

Sanders asserted that he disagreed with Biden, saying the companies are "greedy, corrupt and engaged in price fixing," in a statement obtained by The Hill.

“At a time when their behavior is literally killing people every day, America needs a president who isn’t going to appease and compliment drug companies — we need a president who will take on the pharmaceutical industry – whether they like it or not.

</snip>


intercst
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“At a time when their behavior is literally killing people every day, America needs a president who isn’t going to appease and compliment drug companies — we need a president who will take on the pharmaceutical industry – whether they like it or not.


So Gileads Hep C drug is killing people ever day? I think the hyperbolic needs to go and each drug and company should be evaluated. Lumping everyone into the same bag seems like a Trumpian move.

Andy
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buynholdisdead asks,

So Gileads Hep C drug is killing people ever day?

Sure. If you let the halo around the drug blind you to drug industry misdeeds.

For every Harvoni, there's a half dozen Oxycontins. And US Harvoni patients are paying double the cost of those in Europe -- largely because we got Corporate DEMs like Joe Biden "on the take".

https://www.reuters.com/article/health-hepatitis-gilead-solv...

intercst
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For every Harvoni, there's a half dozen Oxycontins. And US Harvoni patients are paying double the cost of those in Europe -- largely because we got Corporate DEMs like Joe Biden "on the take".

Like I said I think you have to look at them on a one on one comparison. Hep C was a death sentence not to long ago. My brother in law, a medic in a prison, was stuck by a needle. You guessed it Hep C. Gilead saved his life. No doubt there are drug companies that are sticking it to people. But when a company comes out with a drug that cures, well that is amazing. If they come out with a drug that cures dementia or Alzheimers how much will that be worth? I think everyone needs to make a profit or money for their product/ or abilities. How much that is worth is what is up to debate. Free can't be an option, somebody has to pay.

Andy
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I would pay everything we have--literally, EVERY DOLLAR invested or otherwise, so all we had to live on was SS & DH's mini-pension, if that's what it took to roll back his dementia. We could live in a cr@ppy apartment (I've lived in them before!) or a van by the river. Just to have his brains back.

My brother was on Harvonie a year ago. Medicare paid in full. I keep forgetting to ask my doc to order a Hep test. I punctured myself on one of his used diabetes lancets when I was tidying his house (before maids came over) a few years ago.
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I would pay everything we have--literally, EVERY DOLLAR invested or otherwise, so all we had to live on was SS & DH's mini-pension, if that's what it took to roll back his dementia. We could live in a cr@ppy apartment (I've lived in them before!) or a van by the river. Just to have his brains back.

I apologize alstro if any of my remarks caused you any harm. I have seen the devastation this disease has on the people that have it and the people around them. Stripping people of their humanity and dignity. I too would give all my worth up if I could solve this problem and also cancer. These two diseases are the scourge of our life's, at this time.

Andy
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Oh, not a bit, Andy (which happens to be one of my favorite names).

Personally, I'd trade the hubster's dementia for cancer. Any cancer. Really. The only condition I think would be as bad as dementia would be surviving the kinds of horrific injuries people suffer when mowed down by an AR-15. (Which IMO should be illegal outside the military and SWAT teams.)
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alstroemeria writes,

Personally, I'd trade the hubster's dementia for cancer. Any cancer. Really.

</snip>


Did you see 60 Minutes tonight? They had a segment on frontotemporal dementia.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/frontotemporal-dementia-devasta...

The Manufacturing Engineer they profiled in the story looked fairly happy. His wife was devastated, but the dementia had him taking the whole mess in stride.

intercst
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Why is Sanders still in the race? It is about time democrats eliminate Sanders. He is not electable and at this point pulling the party far too left. It is time to get him out of the race. Senator Warren doesn't need the pressure from Sanders on the left.
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Kingran asks,

Why is Sanders still in the race? It is about time democrats eliminate Sanders. He is not electable and at this point pulling the party far too left. It is time to get him out of the race. Senator Warren doesn't need the pressure from Sanders on the left.

</snip>


Sanders and Warren have two different constituencies (Bernie's is a much younger crowd.) But eventually I think Bernie will throw his support behind Warren in exchange for the HHS Secretary job.

Ideologically they're on the same page. Warren is just better at explaining the arithmetic to poor whites that have been voting against their economic interests for years.

intercst
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Neither of these people described seem like my husband. For years, all he lost was language. Gradually memory became more of an issue. Anything he doesn't do often, he forgets how to do.

His personality hasn't changed much--nothing like described. Other than somewhat less interest in other people (aside from me and those closest to us), largely due to lack of conversation with them, but he still waves at others when he walks or drives by. And occasional willingness to hit me when he's angry, but he;s less apt to get angry than he was a year or two ago. Once in a while when I ask him to do something beyond his capability and end up doing it myself, it can tick him off. He slammed a door at me just yesterday when I asked him to pull the corners of the fitted sheet and mattress pad off the upper corners of the bed (so I could wash them) and he didn't understnad (despite the fact that I was pulling off those corners at the foot of the bed at the time), and I realized it's been weeks since that happened.

If my husband ever didn't recognize himself in a mirror, he never said so. And now he isn't capable of saying so. But he looks in the mirror daily--combing hair, shaving, brushing teeth, etc. and has never freaked out. He's always cheerful when doing so, so I imagine it hasn't happened. Or if it did, it didn't upset him?!

MAny things are the same. He's still energetic, has steady hands, is fairly strong (despite muscle wasting), loves walking. He still wants to accomplish things.

I just asked him to plug in my phone, and he did it immediately and correctly. Surprised me ;-)
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Why is Sanders still in the race? It is about time democrats eliminate Sanders. He is not electable and at this point pulling the party far too left. It is time to get him out of the race. Senator Warren doesn't need the pressure from Sanders on the left.

My personal experience (with my sister and her family) is many of Bernie's supporters are rabid, cult-like. Bernie is determined, dogmatic, stubborn and won't give up. He really believes what he is preaching - by the way I agree with much of what he says -- but I think it is pie-in-the-sky. This country will have to take some incremental steps to fix our problems. I don't believe the majority of people who vote will take the full socialism spiel and vote for it. People are ready for change again. Donald Trump was a change candidate, but the most divisive, I-hate-both-candidates change we have ever seen. I now think outside my visceral disgust with the Trump Administration and look at the whole picture. People, especially political analysts and cable news reporters, like to say Trump can still win. I don't believe it. Yes, I know he won once. But he barely squeaked by and he has lost enough percentage points in battleground states to lose. It is way too early for it to completely matter except for one thing: he has never gained support. He never tries to reach out, to increase his base. He always appeals to the most hardcore, right-wing nuts. That is not going to work again. Some of his support from traditional Republicans has eroded. I am not talking about politicians. They support him out of fear and survival. Last point: Trump is erratic and scary. I think a small percentage of his original voters realize that and will vote for any Democrat.

I am not hawking this book (link below). One of the reviews said it is thrown together. Maybe that reviewer is a Trump supporter? But this pollster was on Morning Joe today. His polls say Donald Trump's support has consistently eroded and people are resisting in a big way (elections and how high the negatives are). I see that in my area in Georgia.
(sorry this post is so long but maybe it will help some people have hope)

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07NTY749R/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?...
A leading pollster and adviser to America’s most important political figures explains why the Republicans will crash in 2020.

For decades the GOP has seen itself in an uncompromising struggle against a New America that is increasingly secular, racially diverse, and fueled by immigration. It has fought non-traditional family structures, ripped huge holes in the social safety net, tried to stop women from being independent, and pitted aging rural Evangelicals against the younger, more dynamic cities.

Since the 2010 election put the Tea Party in control of the GOP, the party has condemned America to years of fury, polarization and broken government. The election of Donald Trump enabled the Republicans to make things even worse. All seemed lost.

But the Republicans have set themselves up for a shattering defeat.

In RIP GOP, Stanley Greenberg argues that the 2016 election hurried the party’s imminent demise. Using amazing insights from his focus groups with real people and surprising revelations from his own polls, Greenberg shows why the GOP is losing its defining battle. He explores why the 2018 election, when the New America fought back, was no fluke. And he predicts that in 2020 the party of Lincoln will be left to the survivors, opening America up to a new era of renewal and progress.
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<<Sanders and Warren have two different constituencies (Bernie's is a much younger crowd.) But eventually I think Bernie will throw his support behind Warren in exchange for the HHS Secretary job.>>



In my view Sanders would be nutz to trade his independence and gadfly status for being the head drone in HHS.

FAR better to continue to be a US Senator.

The Senate would be the graveyard of Warren's bright ideas.



Seattle Pioneer
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the Republicans have set themselves up for a shattering defeat.

I agree. BUT. Vote suppression, vote fraud, gerrymandering.

Still, 2020 may be reminiscent of 2008/2012, when a couple of Mom's more intelligent Republican, church-going bridge friends took her aside to whisper they were voting for Obama over McCain (or Romney, I forget which)--but please don't tell anybody!
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And occasional willingness to hit me when he's angry,...

That should be a deal-breaker. I don't get really angry very easily, which is good given how violent I could be when I was younger. But 1poorlady is immune. I won't touch her and she knows it. She has been afraid a couple of times, but never for herself. It was for other people who were getting really close to having me shut them down hard (one guy in the Philippines was being an extreme ass to her, and I was ready to send him over the railing of the river boat we were on...she stopped me from doing it or he would have been swimming). But she is completely safe with me, and has no fear of me at all.

If he's willing to hit you, get out. I don't care what else is going on, how long you've been together, how good he is in bed, it doesn't matter. Get out. Red flags. Deal-breaker. Condition Zebra (for those who were in the Navy).

Domestic abuse is never OK. Even the threat of it is never OK. No matter how angry a person may be.
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My personal experience (with my sister and her family) is many of Bernie's supporters are rabid, cult-like. Bernie is determined, dogmatic, stubborn and won't give up. He really believes what he is preaching - by the way I agree with much of what he says -- but I think it is pie-in-the-sky.

I think Bernie appeals because he addresses concerns of common people, actually believes what he's saying (i.e. not lying to the masses to get their votes, and then cozies-up with rich people) which does come across, and until Bernie almost no one said what he says. Today there are several candidates who say it, and I think at least some of them are even sincere.

Regarding Biden, I say again: old. white. guy.

And an old white guy who's been at this so long that I don't think he even knows how to blaze a new trail. He knows politics, but I think he should step aside and let someone younger (and perhaps less-white) run with the ball. His experience is valuable, and tapping that could be useful. But making him the candidate next year I think is a mistake. He is almost the embodiment of the insider corporate democrat, limousine liberal. That will not fly today, nor should it.
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He doesn't haul off and smack me hard or punch me or anything like that. He elbows me in the side once, and it hasn't happened for a long time. Maybe half a dozen times or so altogether. He never hit me or came close or threatened--even remotely--before dementia. He was a generally calm person.

I'm not at all afraid of him--and I'm not a particularly brave person. On the list of issues with his dementia, probably last. I should stop mentioning it, but when addressing change in personality, it seemed worth a mention.

The people in the article with FTD seem much worse than the hubster. Worst thing he does is not do stuff he used to do, which forces me to handle things I hate, plus annoy me and lose things--and prevent us from maintaining most friendships. And sometimes needs reminders to change his underwear and t-shirt and brush hius teeth at night.

He's getting better about putting items on the kitchen island when he doesn't know where to put them away, so I'm hunting for items less often.
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I should stop mentioning it, but when addressing change in personality, it seemed worth a mention.

Absolutely it's worth mentioning. And regardless of the cause, it's still a problem for you. It puts you in potential physical danger. If it's the result of the dementia, then as that progresses the danger increases, apparently. Not his fault but it's still putting you in danger.
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And an old white guy who's been at this so long that I don't think he even knows how to blaze a new trail. He knows politics, but I think he should step aside and let someone younger (and perhaps less-white) run with the ball. His experience is valuable, and tapping that could be useful. But making him the candidate next year I think is a mistake. He is almost the embodiment of the insider corporate democrat, limousine liberal. That will not fly today, nor should it.

Why not? All elections are choices between alternatives. If a limousine liberal is the only kind of liberal that can get elected, it doesn't matter whether progressives would prefer a more revolutionary trail-blazer as President.

Progressives don't like Biden's centrism, embrace of businesses, and rejection of more revolutionary approaches to public policy. Which is all fine....unless that's the type of Democrat that the voters are willing to elect instead of a more progressive, revolutionary candidate.

For example, the progressive base is all aflame about Medicare-for-All. Biden is the only major candidate that has declined to endorse Medicare-for-All. Yet there's a good chance that Medicare-for-All (or at least the version that Sanders and Warren have adopted) will be poison at the ballot box once the Harry and Louise (Part II) ads start running. That's because while progressives embrace the chance to destroy the private insurance industry, most of the voters are reluctant to eliminate private insurance - which they mostly like and don't want to see disappear.

I am frequently teased in my wife's family because I am a Democrat (they're all deeply Republican Cubans). Not since Trump was elected - they're all deeply troubled by him. Since I'm the only Democrat that some of them know, they have been asking me about the primary. Many of them have told me they would vote for Biden if he ran against Trump....and that they'd open up their checkbook and donate to Trump and vote for him again if the nominee were Sanders or Warren, because they're just far too far to the left than they can tolerate.

Progressives are learning the wrong lessons from 2016 and 2018. Trump won because he was perceived as a moderate - an otherwise bog-standard Republican who finally learned the What's the matter with Kansas? lesson and moved to the left, publicly embracing Medicare, Social Security, and progressive positions on free trade. Meanwhile, Clinton moved as far to the left as any Presidential nominee in history....and paid the price in purple states. In 2018, the Democrats ran centrist candidates again - and picked up all those purple House districts.

You'd think that would temper expectations about what type of candidate would be a good standard-bearer to fight Trump in 2020...but I guess not.

Albaby
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I don't think I agree with your characterization of 2016. I don't think Trump was perceived as a moderate at all. I think he gave voice to the racist portion of the population, with some overlap with the group that was fed-up with "business as usual" and wanted an "outsider". In terms of campaign talk, he harped on border security with overlap into jobs (even though they are almost completely unrelated...undocumented workers are not taking coal miner jobs from folks in West Virginia), and also promised "better healthcare for less money".

They thing to learn here is "jobs" and "healthcare". I don't see either as radically progressive topics. I think the Dems did learn that in 2018, so they took the House, and if they carry forward to 2020 they might have a chance without a recession. With a recession, and that campaign talk, they almost certainly will win. Recessions are bad for incumbents.

Biden is "business as usual", and will not appeal, IMO. Minority voters certainly aren't going to come out for him. You would have to have a recession for him to beat Trump.

1poorguy
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Biden is "business as usual", and will not appeal, IMO. Minority voters certainly aren't going to come out for him. You would have to have a recession for him to beat Trump.

1poorguy


If minority voters or any voters need to be motivate to vote out Trump, then what happens to them if he gets re-elected will be what they deserve.

I would vote for any of the Democratic candidates even those that I do not support if it meant that we would get some normalcy back in our government. Trump is just exhausting.
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If minority voters or any voters need to be motivate to vote out Trump, then what happens to them if he gets re-elected will be what they deserve.

I agree. And we've seen that made manifest in 2016. I recall seeing interviews with black Americans who lamented "none of them look like me". There's more power to that than there should be, and I think it dangerous to ignore that power. To many people of that demographic the old white people are interchangeable. No difference in that both will ignore them, allow lead to contaminate their water, etc. True or not, that appears to be the perception.

I would vote for any of the Democratic candidates even those that I do not support if it meant that we would get some normalcy back in our government.

As would I. The only thing that will stop me is death. Otherwise that's what I will be doing in 14 months.
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If minority voters or any voters need to be motivate to vote out Trump, then what happens to them if he gets re-elected will be what they deserve.

I would vote for any of the Democratic candidates even those that I do not support if it meant that we would get some normalcy back in our government. Trump is just exhausting.


I do not understand the thought processes of any group in this country that insists on a candidate "reaching out" to them or insisting that a candidate "show me this or show me that" in order to be motivated to vote. Pull the ol' head out people. "Either you kiss my azz or I'll commit suicide"! Yeah. That's a plan

Yes, anyone who needs to be motivated to vote in this election and isn't already onboard deserves what they get.
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" Trump is just exhausting."

Perhaps you are just exhausted from all of the pointless nonsense being stirred up by the feckless Democrat sore losers. The truth is slowly coming out and I am sure that you will be even more exhausted before this is over.
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{{ I don't think Trump was perceived as a moderate at all. }}


I did not vote for him. But the expectations among those I know who did vote for him were that he would likely be socially conservative (mostly about abortion) but that he would be more fiscally liberal than they would have preferred.

c
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I don't think Trump was perceived as a moderate at all.

He absolutely was.

It’s true that Trump is president, but it’s not true that Trump ran and won as an ideological extremist. He paired extremely offensive rhetoric on racial issues with positioning on key economic policy topics that led him to be perceived by the electorate as a whole as the most moderate GOP nominee in generations. His campaign was almost paint-by-numbers pragmatic moderation. He ditched a couple of unpopular GOP positions that were much cherished by party elites, like cutting Medicare benefits, delivered victory, and is beloved by the rank and file for it.

* * *

Trump ran as an Iraq War proponent who vowed to avoid new Middle Eastern military adventures, as an opponent of cutting Social Security and Medicare (and Medicaid), and as the first-ever Republican candidate to try to position himself as an ally to the LGBTQ community — going so far as to actually speak the words “LGBTQ.”

Trump was, similarly, seen as much less conservative than Mitt Romney, John McCain, or George W. Bush, perhaps for the very sensible reason that he’d abandoned the conservative positions on the main issues of Bush-era politics.


https://www.vox.com/2019/7/2/20677656/donald-trump-moderate-...

That's where Trump was in 2016 - a Republican who was far to the left of the party on Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, and international trade. Again, he was the solution to the "What's the Matter with Kansas?" critique of the GOP base - a Republican who didn't want to gut the social safety net. If you look at the chart in that article, only 47% of voters viewed Trump as a conservative - 101-15 points less than any recent Republican nominee.

Albaby
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Perhaps you are just exhausted from all of the pointless nonsense being stirred up by the feckless Democrat sore losers. The truth is slowly coming out and I am sure that you will be even more exhausted before this is over.

Srsly? Trump is scaring many conservatives. The non-greedy ones anyhow. I guess that excludes you.
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"Srsly? Trump is scaring many conservatives. The non-greedy ones anyhow. I guess that excludes you."

Srsly, the buffoons that are running for the Democrat Socialist party are scaring many sane Democrats. I guess that excludes you.
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Trump won because he was perceived as a moderate . . .

I see absolutely no proof of that and do not believe for one minute that it is true. Trump, the right wing fake news syndicate, and Putin conspired to make uninformed voters angry at government. Then Trump came in and spoke the same ignorant language that these voters used to describe their uninformed attitudes. Moderate ??? The Trump cult is not moderate and never wanted to be moderate. They are angry reactionaries.
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"The Trump cult is not moderate and never wanted to be moderate. They are angry reactionaries."

If they could only be as moderate as you appear to be the world would be so much better.
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Trump, the right wing fake news syndicate, and Putin conspired to make uninformed voters angry at government.

Trump did not create that anger. The middle classes have been angry for quite a while as they have been shafted by the globalization of the world economy. The result of that anger was the election Of Trump & Yellow Vest protest for the past 10 months in the EU concentrated in France.
https://www.oecd.org/newsroom/governments-must-act-to-help-s...
Governments need to do more to support middle-class households who are struggling to maintain their economic weight and lifestyles as their stagnating incomes fail to keep up with the rising costs of housing and education, according to a new OECD report.

Under Pressure: The Squeezed Middle Class says that the middle class has shrunk in most OECD countries as it has become more difficult for younger generations to make it to the middle class, defined as earning between 75% and 200% of the median national income. While almost 70% of baby boomers were part of middle-income households in their twenties, only 60% of millennials are today.

The economic influence of the middle class has also dropped sharply. Across the OECD area, except for a few countries, middle incomes are barely higher today than they were ten years ago, increasing by just 0.3% per year, a third less than the average income of the richest 10%.

The cost of a middle class lifestyle has increased faster than inflation. Housing, for example, makes up the largest single spending item for middle-income households, at around one third of disposable income, up from a quarter in the 1990s. House prices have been growing three times faster than household median income over the last two decades.
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rump did not create that anger.

Not all of it, but watch any part of most of his rallies. He is doing more than his share to stoke the ignorant fears of his xenophobic cult. That cult isn't chanting about lower cost housing or better education. They are screaming about locking up opponents, letting the sick die, and sending women and people of color "back".
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