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I just finished the latest (o.k., so it's been out since last fall) Anne Rice noval Blood and Gold, the story of Marius (although we have heard bits of his tale all the way from The Vampire Lestat.

Is this a new trend in writing, to tell the same story from various points of view? When I was younger, I thought Michael Moorcock pulled it off to some degree with flair, since he was also dealing with a certain amount of time travel as well. In the last few years, I have noted this writing style repeated by David Eddings and now by Anne Rice. Although we also learn what happened to each writer's characters when other characters weren't around as witnesses, it also seems to lead to the occasional continuity error.

These are not people without talent, but I am starting to wonder why they cannot manage to produce works that, while related to previous stories, do not rely on the earlier works verbatim.

Or am I just being nit-picky?

Moonglade
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I gave up on Anne Rice, though I loved her first few books.

I think it is pretty obvious she is a "one trick pony," and can't come up with anything new.
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I have to say that I have enjoyed those stories that I have read. I chalk up most inconsistencies to different characters seeing things differently. I was a little irritated in Pogara to find that Polgara knew her mother was alive all along. I liked Blood and Gold and thought that Rice tried to minimize covering the same territory that had already been done in her other books. I liked it and hope she is getting back on track with her books. I will say again that Memnoch was absolutely horrid.

Mark
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. I will say again that Memnoch was absolutely horrid.


I like it. I REALLY loved The Vampire Lestat, loved the Body Thief and liked Memnoch. The rest I've muddled through, enjoying the prose but not really getting into the story.

6

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I really enjoyed Anne Rice's novel Belinda. Don't know what genre it is - trashy Hollywood romance? Something like that. But I liked it.
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I really enjoyed Anne Rice's novel Belinda. Don't know what genre it is - trashy Hollywood romance? Something like that. But I liked it.</i.

In a remotely related genre, some like the Sleeping Beauty erotica books that Anne Rice wrote as A.N. Roquelaure. Frankly, graphic descriptions of same-sex relationships or BDSM (heterosexual or homosexal) are of little interest to me, and I completely disagree that being abused sexually makes for a stronger character. They certainly are different though LOL. I gave mine away to an intrigued gay friend of mine years ago: I decided that someone ought to "enjoy" them.

Moonglade
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In a remotely related genre, some like the Sleeping Beauty erotica books that Anne Rice wrote as A.N. Roquelaure.

I checked them out. As porn, those books are a failure. And there's nothing else they do well. Maybe that's overly harsh - there are several of those books, so maybe some of them are good. At something. But they sure weren't to my taste.

Give me Pauline Reage anytime ;-). Oops, did I say that out loud?

Belinda was written under the "Anne Rampling" pseudonym.
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These are not people without talent, but I am starting to wonder why they cannot manage to produce works that, while related to previous stories, do not rely on the earlier works verbatim.

At the risk of sounding cynical, whatever sells, sells. Anne Rice has hit the level of cult status. She could probably publish her grocery list. Personally, I dislike her style intensely. The occasional starting of a sentence with a conjunction is one thing, but she takes it way overboard. So many of her sentences begin with "and" her books read like the King James Bible.

I loved Interview with the Vampire. Absolutely adored it, read my one copy to pieces and bought another one. It was like a hot fudge sundae, and I could not wait for the next book. The Vampire Lestat was another hot fudge sundae, nice but not as good as the first one, and I really couldn't see the appeal of his character. I mean, the guy is over 200 years old and still acts like a spoiled teenager. Then there was the third one which was yet another hot fudge sundae, only gooier and the nuts were stale. I gave up after that one. It was to the point where all I could see were sentences beginning with "and."

Or am I just being nit-picky?

Nah. You've just had one too many hot fudge sundaes.

Uhura :o)
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