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of course it went down any thoughts.
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Balt,

You wrote" " of course it went down".

And why wouldn't it? The company is unprofitable, and it has a negative PE of -23.2x. Its P/B is an overly expensive 9.2x vs the insurance industry's avg of 1.1x.

You bought a cutesy name, not a credible investment.

Arindam
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Hi,

I bought some too and it went down, most of the things I have bought are down. The things I want to buy have gone up. Sometimes it feels personal.

I'm just starting out and what i am learning is that as soon as you buy something and for every day after there is an even chance that it will either go up or go down. Over a week, month or a year you can't possibly know if it is going to go up more days than it will go down, you have to think in 5 to 10 years is this business still going to exist and does it have the chance to improve in that time.

Hope that helps,

S
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As a CMF, I cannot offer you individual or specific investment advice. If a company in which you are interested is an active recommendation of a premium service to which you subscribe, then I would defer to that service's recommendation status. I would also encourage you to serve up your own opinion on the company and asking for comments.

The investing question for any company is whether you have high conviction in its long term (3-5 years or longer) potential growth. To decide for yourself, I would encourage reading recent earnings call transcripts to see what is on the minds of the company's management team and what analysts think is important. Check out the company's Premium Profile page for Premium Community coverage articles, and join the company's Premium Community discussion board to learn from and share with your fellow Premium Fools. You can also look to see if the company has a Public Community discussion board as well.

Then weigh all you have learned to decide whether the company would be a good investment.

Fuskie
Who notes that the question to ask is what is your conviction in a company's long term (3-5 years or longer) growth potential...

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Following up on my previous remarks that LMND isn't a credible investment, Zack's rates the company as a SELL and shares lost another (-4.3%) in today's trading.
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This morning --so far-- LMNF is down another (-4.69%) as "the market" punishes those who failed to do even the most basic of due-diligence and --instead-- bought shares of a company that is forecast to remain unprofitable for the next three years. Folks, that ain't investing. It's speculating, which Ben Graham rightly scorns in his intro to value investing, The Intelligent Investor.

Obviously, LMND is a short. But since shares are hard to borrow, the better plan --for them already long-- would be to put together a repair plan using options. Anyone else should avoid this over-hyped, mistakenly-touted stock (and MELI as well, but that's a post for another time).

Arindam

(Who knows knows a friend, who knows a friend, who has a cousin, who will sell you some swap land, or a bridge or two, on which you're as likely to turn a profit as from buying shares in LMND, especially given the fact that LMND is trying to break into an already overcrowded industry with at least 44 other, far more established (and profitable) companies that aren't just cutesy names but are viable, credible businesses with track records to prove it.)
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Aridam,

You have me puzzled and frustrated. So you are a wealthy person that has made money with sound investment strategies. So it puzzles me why such a profile would bother or see the need to waste time in these forums which clearly are below your level (I would be enjoying my life instead!).

However, given that for some reason you do give your time here, it frustrates me to always read sarcastic and mocking comments from you, instead of using the posts to deliver value to fellow investors.

For example, instead of telling us how fool we are for buying Lemonade with a long term view, show us how you analyse it to say yes or not. Most companies in accelerated growth are not profitable as they spend to expand, so how to adjust the traditional metrics to companies like that?... this kind of input from such an advanced investor would be really good for the forum.

I am trying to be constructive.

Regards,

PIZ
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Pete,

Thanks for getting angry and for pushing back. Now, maybe, a fruitful discussion can begin.

So let me ask this question: "How much is Enough?" $1 million? $10 million? $10 billion? My contention is that most Americans have no idea what a reasonable answer would be. They don't realize how incredibly wealthy they are compared to prior generations or most of the world's populations that "we" --and I have to include myself as a member of the empire-- are ruthlessly, mercilessly exploiting.

What are we, maybe 5% of the world's population, but consume 25% of its resources? Global warming is a crock. It's bad policy derived from worse science. What is serious is the US's endless wars of aggression, invasion, and conquest. That's what's going to bite us in the butt and end our empire, which is already unraveling. What's our ratio of debt to GDP? How long will it be before the $US loses its status as the current reserve currency? When that happens, all of us in the empire become poor, some more so than others. I'm not guns and gold nut. But I do know hard times are ahead. Therefore, I try to keep my hand in the game, not to accumulate yet more dollars that I don't want/don't need, but to have a bit of fun before the end does come, playing what amounts penny poker.

I grew up in a household that "invested", bought my first stock when I was ten, doubled my money, and thought "investing" was easy, a mistake it took many years of work and study to overcome. In bull markets, anyone can be an investing genus. In bear markets, which are coming, things won't be easy, and the skills to do one's own due-diligence will mean the diff between survival and blowup.

I don't know how much you lost buying "recommended" stocks, but I wish you hadn't lost that money, and I know that you didn't need to. No one held a gun to your head and forced you to buy. But someone should have been there to warn you away from buying and acting on bad advice. If not me, then someone else. You need to find a mentor and to stop listening to the financial equivalent of used-car salesmen.

Arindam
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