No. of Recommendations: 6
Most all of us observed yesterday's rancor between the leader of the free world and his compatriots from across the aisle. If not, we all surely have tuned in to a national news broadcast since November's elections produced a change in the balance of power in Washington, D.C.

As a result, it is plain to see we are heading for a period of time between 2019 and 2021 when no substantive legislation of any kind can make it through both houses of Congress and/or receive the chief executive's imprimatur. Similarly, the control and focus of all regulatory agencies across the District of Columbia and environs will be stifled, with no substantive programs or initiatives able to survive struggles with one or other warring faction.

Finally, we are 100% guaranteed to see endless legal maneuvers (and some illegal ones, as well), with courts at every level of review becoming tied up in knots trying to split the proverbial baby in whatever manner is least likely to be overturned, yet suits the judge or panel's own bias.

In a word we will have, "gridlock." Gridlock of the most intractable kind.

Who benefits most from gridlock? Companies. Big companies. Big companies with monopolies or near-monopolies.

For the next two years, buying big company stocks is virtually a sure bet.

;-)
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Who benefits most from gridlock? Companies. Big companies. Big companies with monopolies or near-monopolies.

Could you explain why you think they would benefit more than, say, fast growing mid-size or small companies?

DB2
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No. of Recommendations: 5
As a result, it is plain to see we are heading for a period of time between 2019 and 2021 when no substantive legislation of any kind can make it through both houses of Congress and/or receive the chief executive's imprimatur. Similarly, the control and focus of all regulatory agencies across the District of Columbia and environs will be stifled, with no substantive programs or initiatives able to survive struggles with one or other warring faction.

Gridlock is a wonderful governor that acts like negative feedback to limits the power of all elected and unelected bureaucrats. My second most loved outcome over 'us' beating 'them' over the head.


Who benefits most from gridlock? Companies. Big companies. Big companies with monopolies or near-monopolies.

Maybe but I doubt that such a scattershot investing strategy can beat a properly focused effort.


For the next two years, buying big company stocks is virtually a sure bet.

Free advice is worth what you pay for it.

;-)


The Captain
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Free advice is worth what you pay for it.

Oh and that was free. }};-D
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No. of Recommendations: 2
For the next two years, buying big company stocks is virtually a sure bet.

Because big companies have enough "protected free speech" to throw around, on both sides of the aisle, that they can push through legislation beneficial to them?

Steve...still sniffing at Altria
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<<In a word we will have, "gridlock." Gridlock of the most intractable kind.
>>



Not at all. The Federal Courts will just substitute their wisdom instead of relying on laws passed by the Congress and signed by the President -----as usual.


No gridlock when you can rule the country by a 5-4 majority.


Seattle Pioneer
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