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That's been assembled and is now simmering.... Yum.

Vermonter
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At the retirement community I live in, they have a "Beef and Cabbage" soup on the rotation. It reminds me of a chili. No beans. The cabbage isn't really noticeable, as it's mostly broken down into soft, small pieces.
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rharmelink:

This is real cabbage soup, with carmelized onions, carrots, cream and such -- no meat. Yours sounds good too, though.

Vermonter
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Sounds good. Could you share a recipe?
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Cream of Cabbage Soup Recipe:

Ingredients

4 tbs butter (or 2 tbs butter and 2 tbs oil)
1 lg onion, minced
3 cups diced cabbage
1 cup diced carrot
1 can vegetable broth
2 cups water
1 tbs caraway seed
1 tbs cornstarch, dissolved in 1 cup of milk
1-2 cups half & half or 1 large can evaporated skimmed milk

Directions

Melt butter in large soup pan. Wilt onion and cabbage until onion just begins to color. Add carrot, broth, and water. Bring to boil. Stir in caraway seed and simmer, covered, for 1 hour. (Puree with blender, if desired.) Slowly stir in cornstarch and milk mixture. Add half and half. Heat, but do not boil. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

Enjoy! (Caraway seeds optional. Same for puree step; we prefer it chunky so no puree!)
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Looks delish RetiredVermonter!

🙂
ralph
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rainphakir:

It was/is. We're having the "leftovers" tonight!

Vermonter
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Born and raised in Hawaii, I relished a wide variety of food offerings, especially those brought in by foreign laborers (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Puerto Rican and Portuguese) hired to work on the sugar cane and pineapple plantations in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Believe it or not, a local past and present favorite is Portuguese Sausage & Cabbage Soup, introduced by workers from the Azores, a chain of islands southwest of Portugal.

Here’s a recipe (with meat and no beans) very similar to our version with a picture that looks exactly like and how my father cooked and served it at the family table years ago.
Portuguese Sausage and Cabbage Soup
https://www.justapinch.com/recipes/soup/vegetable-soup/portu...

Here’s the Hawaiian version of Caldo Verde (Portuguese Cabbage Soup) using kale.
http://www.kauaigrown.org/recipes/caldo-verde-portuguese-cab...

The Hawaiian commercially-made version of the Portuguese linguiça sausage rivals Spam as a meat item in breakfast along with white rice and some sort of fried eggs. This breakfast combination is so popular locally, you can even find it at McDonald’s drive-ins in Hawaii.

Regards,
Ray
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The only version of cabbage soup I've fixed is an Italian version, more like a stew, called minestre (pronounced muh-NEST in my grandfather's Neapolitan-American dialect). It's cabbage (preferably savoy), onion, garlic, cannelini (white) beans, sausage, oregano, and broth. I like to add fennel bulb or crushed fennel seed, but it isn't authentic to do so.

I fix other cruciferous soups. For last night's supper we had cream of cauliflower (cauliflower, leek, fennel bulb, chicken broth, cream, nutmeg) and a small salad. I also make a couple of kale-based soups. One Moroccan with potato, broth and spices, one with mixed veg and lentils, and I usually put a little kale in minestrone.
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When I was growing up my Mom made a tomato-based cabbage soup with beef bones. I hated it.

Just like I hated the cabbage in her corned beef and cabbage as it was incredibly mushy.

I do like cabbage but not when it no longer has any bite to it and is "mushy".

Nowadays I generally use Brussel sprouts whenever a recipe calls for cabbage.

And when I do cook corned beef and cabbage, I add the cabbage at the very end of the cooking and don't let it get "mushy".

Maybe it's just me but I don't like "mushy" cabbage.

Christina
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Christina:

We just yesterday watched an old Alton Brown show about cabbage! In that, he pointedly shredded the cabbage and cooked it in a LARGE pot of water he set to boiling first (because the large volume of water helps dissipate what causes the smell) and cooked for just 5 minutes before straining and then turning into a pan already hot with some oil, garlic, salt, sugar, and I think baking soda, but not sure. Anyway, he said that halted the hydrogen sulfide that causes the smell, and it resulted in cabbage that was still green and not mushy. I'm no chef, but it looked interesting!

I do like cabbage, by the way, soft in corned beef and, or firmer, as in salad or whatever.

Vermonter
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