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Saw a gardening program on which the guy recommended adding calcium to tomatoes to help fruiting.

What are other people doing for their tomatoes?

Vermonter
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I have a canister of coffee grounds and eggshells I mush up and add to them every few weeks, and I add lava rocks around the base so slugs avoid them. Seems to work okay.

R4M
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I've heard of adding bone meal to the soil for a vegetable garden, but I think you need to be careful not to add too much.

AC *hasn't planted a garden this year*
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Marigolds
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Acid rain tends to lower soil pH. Adding lime is a good way to adjust pH and add calcium.

Last soil test mine was too alkaline from adding wood ashes. So had to add soil acidifier usually used for acid loving plants.

Tomatoes prefer somewhat acidic soil. To add calcium in the case of high pH I would think gypsum (calcium sulfate) would be first choice. Bone meal or egg shells might work. Phosphate rock might work but usually comes from bones. Not easily available. Name is hydroxy appetite.
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Marigolds

My mother once told me that planting marigolds in a vegetable garden keeps certain pests away.

AC *is that what you meant*
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I go out and pee on them.

PSU
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I go out and pee on them.

The plants or .. to keep pests away?
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Not going to have a tomato salad with PSU. Just saying.
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Saw a gardening program on which the guy recommended adding calcium to tomatoes to help fruiting.

What are other people doing for their tomatoes?


We have plenty of calcium and magnesium in my garden soil but I still get “blossom-end rot” in my tomatoes (See https://www.canr.msu.edu/resources/blossom_end_rot_tip_sheet... ), especially in the first tomatoes of the season. Down here the first tomatoes are the only tomatoes of the season as most tomatoes won’t set fruit when the temperatures get into the 90s. It can be minimized /eliminated by adding a diluted calcium foliage spray or drench of calcium chloride or calcium nitrate. One can buy premixed stuff at the garden store but for you folks in the frozen north, calcium chloride is used to remove snow & ice in products from sidewalks/driveways instead of rock salt. We used it offshore for well control work and onshore to control dust. I remembers it cost something like $5.60/70# sack 20 years ago.

Now-a-daze, I get calcium nitrate at the local feed store for around $6 for a 4 pound bag. They recommend a level teaspoon per plant sprinkled around the base of plant followed by a second application two weeks later. I usually mix about a teaspoon in 2 gallons of water and sprinkle that over my 4 plants, which are in pots, every week or so.
;-)

C.J.V. - gots a pair of ducks eating my cherry tomatoes in the pot by the old swimming pool now, me
;-(
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Not going to have a tomato salad with PSU. Just saying.

Funny story. MIL was visiting. I cut some leaf lettuce for her to make a salad. As she is making it, I tell her to wash it good since the dog pees on it. We didn't have salad that night.

PSU
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