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http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/03/05/giant-ancient-camel-......

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So Camels evolved in North America and then migrated across the Bering land bridge several million years ago. It is ironic that now Camels live in the deserts of Saudi Arabia and Africa and Mongolia even though their original home was North America. I think the same is true of horses. They were once a North American animal. That is interesting.

I would love to know what it was that wiped them out some 13,000 years ago. What happened to all the large North American Animals? What wiped them out? I find it difficult to believe that it was just humans that caused it because there were also humans in other parts of the world and they weren't able to wipe out pretty much all large land mammals.

I've read articles that do say however that the Australian Aborigines can be blamed for a lot of the killing off of that continents large marsupials after they migrated there 40 to 50 thousand years ago.

Art
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Art53 writes,

I've read articles that do say however that the Australian Aborigines can be blamed for a lot of the killing off of that continents large marsupials after they migrated there 40 to 50 thousand years ago.

Here's an interesting theory along the same lines. A Duke University professor argues that dogs/wolves domesticated humans rather than the other way around. Otherwise the humans would have killed off the wolves just like every other predator that competed with humans for food.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/03/130302-dog-d...

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I would love to know what it was that wiped them out some 13,000 years ago. What happened to all the large North American Animals? What wiped them out? I find it difficult to believe that it was just humans that caused it because there were also humans in other parts of the world and they weren't able to wipe out pretty much all large land mammals.

Humans came late to North America. The large mammals likely had no natural fear of us.
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"So Camels evolved in North America and then migrated across the Bering land bridge several million years ago. It is ironic that now Camels live in the deserts of Saudi Arabia and Africa and Mongolia even though their original home was North America. "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

So, ya think that they musta been really humping it to get so far so fast?

Howie52
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Here's an interesting theory along the same lines. A Duke University professor argues that dogs/wolves domesticated humans rather than the other way around. Otherwise the humans would have killed off the wolves just like every other predator that competed with humans for food.

Or, we've been invaded from outer space by dogs (and conquered), as in an old SciFi story from Analog in the '60s. If I remember it correctly, the dogs/aliens make sure every human in a position of power has his own "man's best friend".
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I would love to know what it was that wiped them out some 13,000 years ago.

It's still highly controversial but here's one theory that is still being debated:

Younger Dryas impact hypothesis

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120918111320.ht...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Younger_Dryas_impact_hypothesis...

I heard the Firestone team talk about this at an archaeology conference back in 2007 - just before their publication appeared. It was very exciting, but they would not provide as many details as many would like to have heard. By 2009, a lot of people were claiming that the theory was not holding up to independent analysis of others and included some misinterpretation of the data. But recently, there have been additional findings backing up the idea of a comet explosion in the atmosphere over Canada.
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A Duke University professor argues that dogs/wolves domesticated humans rather than the other way around.

This is an area of archaeology research that I've followed a little bit. The Duke argument is a little bit overstating their case and a little bit debunking their own strawman.

Anyone who has ever trained a dog has probably noticed themselves being trained a little bit too. It is truly symbiotic. You might want the dog to do a certain thing, but the dog is very likely to try to see if their own version of that thing will be good enough. There is almost always some kind of compromise that is worked out.

But even the Duke argument is that aggressive wolves were probably killed while friendly wolves were allowed to eat the garbage. I think that's a real stretch to claim that the wolves trained the humans in that case.

Then there is this, "The hunting hypothesis, that humans used wolves to hunt, doesn't hold up either. Humans were already successful hunters without wolves, more successful than every other large carnivore."

This is pure strawman. The claim isn't that men could not hunt without wolves, it is that they became better hunters with them. Man's sense of smell and night vision pales in comparison to wolves. So even though man was a good hunter, he could also be hunted. But with wolves as symbiotic night watchmen, and trackers, man was an almost unstoppable hunter.

The Duke claims of dog training man have some merit and that aspect of the relationship deserves some attention, but I think any study of primitive cultures and their relationship to dogs makes it pretty clear who the master was.
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"Here's an interesting theory along the same lines. A Duke University professor argues that dogs/wolves domesticated humans rather than the other way around. Otherwise the humans would have killed off the wolves just like every other predator that competed with humans for food.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/03/130302-dog-d......

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I have my own theory on what happened and it has to do with the fact that puppies like to eat human feces. They love it in fact and the more meat humans eat the more puppies like to eat human manure. I think young wolves followed humans to clean up after them so to speak and this was probably welcomed by human tribes of hunter gatherers. I think the domestication of the wolf can be directly attributed to the propensity of puppies like to eat human excrement.

Art
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"I would love to know what it was that wiped them out some 13,000 years ago. What happened to all the large North American Animals? What wiped them out? I find it difficult to believe that it was just humans that caused it because there were also humans in other parts of the world and they weren't able to wipe out pretty much all large land mammals.

Humans came late to North America. The large mammals likely had no natural fear of us. "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

So, you suspect tht early man walked many a mile for a camel?

Howie52
Some things just fester if you try to hold them inside.
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