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Our 12 yr old rescue, Tilly, developed diarrhea over the past month.

Vet put her on Flagyl and a bland diet of unsalted white rice and boiled chicken. Also prescribed Hill's D/D food, wet and dry. We're giving her dry venison.

She loves the chicken/rice, but is not so crazy about the dry venison.

Five days into this regimen, the diarrhea has stopped. She's begun to poop normally.

If she were feral, she'd probably have a diet solely of small birds and rodents [certainly no rice].

So, my questions are: Can we continue to feed her the rice/chicken combo? Are there enough nutrients?

Schvitz
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Sorry to be of no help. Our JB (Jablonski) has lost about 7 pounds, down to 12 lb. from his former 19. Diarrhea every day. His normal BM has been a healthy big stool, but of late it's a small mess. Worse, he is using the bathroom floor instead of his litter tray. Vomits regularly. The vet did a blood work-up and says there is nothing wrong there.

He has also hurt his right front paw and limps pathetically. Again, the vet found nothing organically wrong.

He is still his old, loving self (But he prefers his mommy to me.) He likes to be in my lap, but only for 3-5 minutes.

We don't let him outside any more. He seems not to notice.

JB gets Fancy Feast Chicken, or another chicken formulation. I forgot to mention he can't chew his favorite dry cat food. Had a bad tooth - yet again the vet found nothing wrong.

He is only 13-14 (We don't remember exactly.)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/24160789@N04/12015867504/in/da...

cliff
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Well, maybe I can help you.

The bland boiled chicken/rice diet has helped. Or maybe it's the metronidazole, we don't know.

She does love the food. And it's a lot cheaper than fancy cat food for GI problems.

Try it, if you haven't already done so.

Tilly is also 12 or so. We adopted her when she was 10 [or do the shelter thought].

BTW, the best thing about the chicken/rice diet is that I can eat it if I'm feeling peckish and there's nothing in the fridge. Being Jewish, I add white horse raddish to kick it up.


Schvitz
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Our cat, Sylvie, is going to be 16 in just a few more days. Aside from being a sometimes cranky old lady she is in good health. One of her favorite foods is Natural Balance Tuna & Pumpkin. Also AvoDerm Tuna and Crab. Lawrence also buys Blue Wilderness Chicken and Turkey and Perfect Bistro Tuna Nicoise for her.

Her coat is still shiny. Of course she never goes outdoors.

AM
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Time flies, as the cliched say . . . I can't believe it has been 16 years. I remember well when you first got her. :) She's a beautiful cat.

My current two are each 10 years old, and also never go outside.

Wessex
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My current two are each 10 years old, and also never go outside.

Wessex


JB hasn't been outside since he got sick - several weeks. He doesn't seem to mind/notice. We were wondering how he would react when we move to the OFH, when he has to be an indoor cat. Apparently no problem.
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“My cat” (she would object to the possessive), I call Ocelot after her markings, never comes inside and visits the house courtyard from over the wall only to torment our Golden Retriever. She is a tough wild cat who adopted us last year, a drought year, as she first came close to drink from the water troughs we had put out for the ever more desperate foxes, squirrels, and coatimundis. Since she adopted us we no longer have rats or mice invading the house.

She likes to hang out with me when i am sitting in the being restored woods of our back acre. Some day she may even get close enough for me to pet her.


David fb
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That's a good thing -- unhappy cats are no fun. :)

Wessex
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I had an extremely ironical grandma, who lived with the family of my extremely whimsical aunt. They had the perfect cat for the two of them, an extremely contented ironical whimsical mischievous dangerous cat they named Tiger Lilly.

Tiger Lilly (TL) adored climbing trees, posing as a leopard, and terrorizing anyone who walked under her. My Admiral uncle coming home in his splendor, the mailman the milkman with their burdens, young friends of my young who had heard the tales, all looked up into the trees carefully before walking up the walk to the door.

I was there when TL nailed a too self consciously superior Standard Poodle who was casually p’ing on the front yard. Suddenly, like death from the sky, TL dropped onto that dog’s long back and dug all four of her carefully placed claws symmetrically into his two sides spanning from shoulders to haunches. The ride lasted for about 45 seconds of hysterical howling and yowling and twisting and jumping I guessed more in pure surprised terror than pain (I glanced at the watch after I’m guessing about 15 and it went on for another 31), before “Monsieur” (as gran called him) gave up all dignity and yappingly rolled over to rid himself of her. She leapt off and climbed another tree. He ran off and never returned.

She was 8 years old at that time, and lived to have and outlive 14 grandkittens. From 16 on she lived entirely inside the house, moving between the fireplace hearth and the foot of gran’s bed with its electric blanket until she died at 18 or so.

She was an excellent mouser as well. Birds she watched but left alone.


David fb
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Since we are telling cat stories, I will mention a variety of felines who've lived with me over the last 30 years. Radford was a stray who showed up on the doorstep of some friends when I was in grad school, probably left behind by students who were moving out. He was FIV-positive, and since we lived on Capitol Hill in Seattle, we felt as though he fit right in. That was in the days when the Chicken Soup Brigade was spending a lot of time with people who were dying of AIDS. One of our housemates did a lot of that work while we were doing physics problem sets. It was a weird mix.

He lived with FIV with us for a solid decade and made the transit from Washington State to Washington DC wiht us. They told us he was an older cat (by which they meant 7 or 8) when we got him. Other than dealing with an infestation of fleas when he first arrived, he was a remarkably dignified and thoughtful cat who, nonetheless, resented that we wouldn't let him go out to wrangle with the neighboring cats. He got out once and came back with an infected bite mark, making us even more careful after that. He died when DD was about 15 months old. Not of FIV, but rather of kidney failure. We figured he was 17 or 18 by then.

Henry came to live with us about nine months before Radford died. He was a gray striped wild man who my brothers taught to fetch foil balls -- which was fine -- and to attack anything that moved under the covers on a bed -- which was not fine. He was determined to make it out of the house, and DD's only memories of him are from when he would wait around a corner and then attack her. He was also determined to get out of the house. One day when we were having the house painted, the painters left a second story window open and he jumped out. He then ran up and over the back fence and was never seen again, though we looked for weeks.

Then there was a long gap in cats, because I was commuting to Ohio to see DH and there was no one else in the house. Once DH moved here, we picked out Ariel. She was allegedly full grown when she came to us, but obviously wasn't. Her papers said that she was pregnant when they spayed her, and the vet was perplexed as to why she was so obviously a house cat who was labeled as feral. My theory is that she had been raised from a kitten until she went into heat the first time, got out of whatever house she was living in, got pregnant, and then tried to find people to go back to. They took her to the shelter, where her story started again. She's the kind of cat who goes nearly catatonic under stress, so was silent and scared at the shelter. But at the same time she was willing to be held and sniffed our hands, head-butted us and liked a scritch. So we brought her home and she has been with us for five years now. She has, over the past couple of years, become more and more willing to play in and be near water. She recently became extremely ill and we discovered that she has kidney stones and possibly polycystic kidney disease, something that is common in some Persians -- but not in orange and white striped cats like her. After two weeks of subcutaneous fluids and changing her over to all canned food, she's much healthier, but we understand that kidney damage is not reversible. As long as I can get DD through the end of high school and away to college before the next crisis, I'll be satisfied, though.

ThyPeace, Giving subcutaneous fluids to a cat, even one as docile as Ariel, is a two person job. My brothers and I got the worst scratches of our lives trying to do it with Radford.
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Just to clarify, the "us" that moved from Seattle to DC was my ex, DD's other mom, and me. We sent Radford on the plan to my ex's parents in Chicago, and then on another flight to her grandmother in Baltimore. Meanwhile, one brother, my ex, and I drove my little red 1989 Honda Civic all the way across the country. At the time, it took all of Sting's published albums to make it from one side of Montana to the other. And since it was all downhill, the little Civic got 50 miles per gallon that day.

ThyPeace, we camped along the way. That night we stayed just across the border in North Dakota. My ex got 3 mosquito bites while we were putting up the tent. My brother got 7 or 8. I got more than 30.
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ThyPeace, Giving subcutaneous fluids to a cat, even one as docile as Ariel, is a two person job. My brothers and I got the worst scratches of our lives trying to do it with Radford.

Our Lucy, a flame point Siamese, was the sweetest, most docile cat ever. https://www.flickr.com/photos/24160789@N04/11443048956/in/da... She belonged to the woman who lived in the apartment behind us, a gift from her BF. When the woman moved out she left the cat. The BF seemed much more attached to the cat than she was, cause he came around to feed her sometimes - but not as regular as he should have. We thought she had been abandoned. We would walk out and sit on her stoop and she would come to be fed, but mostly to be petted. We eventually took her into the house with our other three. After while the BF identified himself and told us her name (She had a blue diamond collar, so Lucy with diamonds.) We had been calling her Biscuit until we knew her name. She was very afraid of strangers, so it's odd that she adopted us so quickly. We refused to let him have her back.

Some yeas later (and in a different house) she went into the back yard, and something scared her and she went over the fence - gone. We grieved for her and scoured the neighborhood for her to no avail. Six weeks later she showed up at our back door. Acted as if she had just been out for a minute. But she never went out again. She remained afraid of strangers and would disappear when anyone came into the house. She did eventually accept our Italian friends who came over to play cards some times.

She jumped onto the cook top once. https://www.flickr.com/photos/24160789@N04/6015193652/in/dat...

When she was old, she needed subcutaneous fluids - don't recall her symptoms, but I injected her fluids on a daily basis. She was so gentile she didn't even struggle. We cried when she had to go to kitty heaven.

Cliff
*** Isn't it mandatory to post a picture when you tell a cat story?
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Our 12 yr old rescue, Tilly, developed diarrhea over the past month.

Vet put her on Flagyl and a bland diet of unsalted white rice and boiled chicken. Also prescribed Hill's D/D food, wet and dry. We're giving her dry venison.

She loves the chicken/rice, but is not so crazy about the dry venison.

Five days into this regimen, the diarrhea has stopped. She's begun to poop normally.

If she were feral, she'd probably have a diet solely of small birds and rodents [certainly no rice].

So, my questions are: Can we continue to feed her the rice/chicken combo? Are there enough nutrients?

Schvitz


Your vet is treating her the same as any of my dogs have ever been treated with diarrhea. Flagyl (metronidazole) treats bacterial type infections and may have solved the problem. I have never had a pet, canine or feline, who will eat any of the Hill's food. Rice and small amounts of pumpkin puree (because it is used for both constipation and diarrhea and there is a fine balance:) may help her...but, sounds to me like flagyl was the cure.

Also, 12 years old is not usually the end of the line for a cat. Our almost 18 year old rescue would agree. She's mostly blind but, is as demanding as ever. She eat's, demands to be brushed and runs the house, keeping one Sheltie and one German Shepherd in line.

Side note...our other rescue lived to 20. Her eyesight was good but, she was deaf.

-Donna...mix of rescues and show animals...

P.S. I will bore you another time with tales about my up and coming German Shepherd. I made it to Westminster last year with one I co-owned. We will see how the 6 month old laying at my feet performs in future.
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Your vet is treating her the same as any of my dogs have ever been treated with diarrhea. Flagyl (metronidazole) treats bacterial type infections and may have solved the problem. I have never had a pet, canine or feline, who will eat any of the Hill's food. Rice and small amounts of pumpkin puree (because it is used for both constipation and diarrhea and there is a fine balance:) may help her...but, sounds to me like flagyl was the cure.

She's not out of the woods yet, and we're keeping her on th Flagyl for a second week. Don't know what it is, but I agree with you on Hill's. Tilley loves the chicken/rice, but I'll try adding pumpkin. She also loves Royal Canin I/D rabbit.

I've also given her cans of Purina Pro Plan Sensitive duck. She licks the plate clean. It's much cheaper than an Rx food. Maybe, it'll do when I get tired of cooking her meals.


Schvitz
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Royal Canin PR, not I/D

Schvitz
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These diet ideas are good. Ariel hates (HATES) the Hill's kidney diet stuff. I tried mixing it with her regular food, and even at a 1 to 20 ratio, she will not touch it at this point. We have always fed her commercial Hill's and she has liked that, but the prescription stuff is terrible. I've been thinking of getting a note from the vet and trying out a variety of other kinds that they allegedly have at our local PetSmart. Good to know that Royal Canin is more commonly acceptable.

This morning was a pill (for appetite) and fluids morning. She spat out the pill, I lost the first one, tried again, spat the second one out twice, and started drooling all over the place. She did "fine" with the fluids (meaning she didn't kill either of us), which I have learned to warm up in a bowl of water before putting into her. Apparently that's easier to put up with.

Then when I was changing the needle, the cap came off and I stuck myself in a jagged way on my thumb and one finger. Lost the cap in the process, too. I eventually got the needle off with a snub-nose pliers. There's a bandaid on my thumb and a paper towel nearby for the smaller cut on my finger.

ThyPeace, sigh. The cat is chipper as can be at this point, and eating the kitten-food mix of chicken and liver that I accidentally picked up. First she's really eaten since yesterday at noon, so that's a win. And actually, immediately post-pill, I can get her to eat some of the kidney diet, so I just mixed that in too.
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Have you tried getting a mouse to eat the pill and then let the cat get the mouse?

Howie52
The only problem is that most cats might just tear the head off the mouse and leave the body
on the kitchen floor - probably with the pill placed neatly next to the mouse's left back foot.
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Mice. Good lord, that's been a trial the two times she got at them. No thank you.

I found her last pill stuck neatly to the side of my shoe with cat spit. Sigh. Luckily, I tried a different food and she decided to eat it, so the appetite stimulant is optional for now. I am currently typing with fewer fingers than usual due to the unpleasant needle stick injury I gave myself during yesterday morning's subcutaneous fluids administration. Better than a few days before that when the needle went all the way through the skin and all I managed to do was get the towel we had her wrapped in all wet.

I hear from my veterinary student stepson that this is all part of the normal learning process and to just keep working at it. She is, at least, acting like we're keeping her basically well hydrated.

ThyPeace, when things start to go sideways, she first stares at me intently while sitting straight up, and then takes to lying limply in the warmest place she can find.
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