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This was mentioned in today's Dr. Gott column. Its "a professional who helps seniors and their adult children find answers when they are forced to address the issues of aging."

This is a subject that doesn't get much discussion on TMF. What do we know about such services? Where do you look for one when you need one?
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How many of these "Certified Senior Advisers" pedal variable annuities?

intercst
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pauleckler , you asked:

<< This was mentioned in today's Dr. Gott column. Its "a professional who helps seniors and their adult children find answers when they are forced to address the issues of aging."

This is a subject that doesn't get much discussion on TMF. What do we know about such services? Where do you look for one when you need one?
>>

Perhaps the following web site might answer your questions to some extent:

http://society-csa.com/
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I had never heard of a certified senior advisor before. In checking the society website provided I was a bit surprised to see a large number in my area. It appears that the majority of them are in insurance or financial planning. While I can see a potential need for some specialists in this area I would have to be convinced that the certification isn't a bit of a gimick.

Bob
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Thanks, TT.

I agree with CABob. I am surprised to learn that this is another certification for financial advisers.

We often talk about the need for an elder attorney--especially on the Estate Planning board. That's to deal with nursing home issues and especially protecting assets for spouse and qualifying for Medicaid if you need it.

But I would expect there are experts in dealing with numerous other senior issues. I was expected a CSA to be a general purpose adviser to help you find say in home assistance for aging parents, Meals on Wheels, or other such issues.

There must be a whole world of services out there for those who need them. Some if you can pay for them. Some if you can't. Where do you find them?
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pauleckler:

<< Thanks, TT. >>

You're welcome.

<< I agree with CABob. I am surprised to learn that this is another certification for financial advisers. >>

Well, yes . . . I guess you can say it's a bit of a” gimmick.” It's a “gimmick” in that provides ongoing training and information through continuing education or the quarterly journals so one can better understand and address the issues of seniors. The information can be used and/or passed along to through one's own system or use some of the services they provide that might make it easier (e.g. monthly or quarterly new letter). . . .

. . . . a “gimmick” that not only helps keep clients aware of current events and issues concerning seniors but also helps show that servicing seniors is of special interest to a particular professional.

And maybe because is it a rather new and not well known designation, it will tend to be viewed as a “gimmick” for a while until it's legitimacy really gets a foothold (look how long it took for the CFP).

BTW: PhD's and other Dr. and RN's who regularly deal with geriatrics write a great majority of the articles in the quarterly journal.

<< We often talk about the need for an elder attorney--especially on the Estate Planning board. That's to deal with nursing home issues and especially protecting assets for spouse and qualifying for Medicaid if you need it.

But I would expect there are experts in dealing with numerous other senior issues. I was expected a CSA to be a general purpose adviser to help you find say in home assistance for aging parents, Meals on Wheels, or other such issues.
>>

Those are indeed some of the kinds of issues that is dealt with. And for Financial Planners who like to deal with seniors, this kind of service tends to provide just the kind of information that can be helpful rather than spending a lot of valuable time surfing the Internet for such things. This is probably why you see so many “financial planners” who are also CSA's.

<< There must be a whole world of services out there for those who need them. Some if you can pay for them. Some if you can't. Where do you find them? >>

That's exactly the kind of thing an advisor/processional can better do through the use of the services provided by Society of Certified Senior Advisors.

Yes . . . TTR is a CSA. ;-)
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The qualifications to become a CSA are staggering. From the website:

What does becoming a CSA involve? It's very simple.

1. Register for the next training class or correspondence course now.

2. Make your payment.

3. Book your hotel and flight reservations. (not required with correspondence course)

4. Anticipate making many new friends and contacts.

5. Plan to learn a great deal of fascinating information that will improve the quality of your business and personal life.


And I thought picking up an MD was hard! :)

Nick
CFP, CLU, ChFC, CSA, DYNI (Do you need insurance?), HBA (How Bout Annuities?)




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No doubt the training includes golf and tennis lessons at a nice resort somewhere in the sunbelt.
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<< No doubt the training includes golf and tennis lessons at a nice resort somewhere in the sunbelt. >>

LOL . . . .I wish!
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