No. of Recommendations: 11
Answerable to no one

"There can be unseemly exposure of the mind as well as of the body, as the progressive mind is exposed in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a creature of the labyrinthine Dodd-Frank legislation. Judicial dismantling of the CFPB would affirm the rule of law and Congress’s constitutional role.

The CFPB’s director, Richard Cordray, was installed by one of Barack Obama’s spurious recess appointments when the Senate was not in recess. Vitiating the Senate’s power to advise and consent to presidential appointments is congruent with the CFPB’s general lawlessness.

The CFPB nullifies Congress’s power to use the power of the purse to control bureaucracies because its funding — “determined by the director” — comes not from congressional appropriations but from the Federal Reserve. Untethered from all three branches of government, unlike anything created since 1789, the CFPB is uniquely sovereign: The president appoints the director for a five-year term — he can stay indefinitely, if no successor is confirmed — and the director can be removed, but not for policy reasons.

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Like the Independent Payment Advisory Board, Obamacare’s health-care rationing panel, the CFPB embodies progressivism’s authoritarianism — removing much policymaking from elected representatives and entrusting it to unaccountable “experts” exercising an unfettered discretion incompatible with the rule of law. Similarly, when Obama allows states to waive work requirements that the 1996 welfare reform law explicitly made non-waivable, he evades the Constitution’s provision conferring a conditional presidential veto power — ignoring the law becomes preferable to a veto Congress can override. And the waivers make a mockery of the Constitution enjoining the president to “take care that the laws be faithfully executed.”"

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/george-will-a-governm...

Great article by George Will. Read the rest of it. It's pretty unbelievable.

F.A. Hayek was right in The Road to Serfdom. As we move towards socialism, discretion necessarily must increase and the rule of law suffers.
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Obama is entitled to do whatever he wants. After all, he was elected by 100% or more of registered voters in many places. Such perfection is beyond question.
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Similarly, when Obama allows states to waive work requirements that the 1996 welfare reform law explicitly made non-waivable, he evades the Constitution’s provision conferring a conditional presidential veto power — ignoring the law becomes preferable to a veto Congress can override.

I've mentioned this before. I read the law, and it's clear that Obama is clearly violating it, and the media went after Romney for having the b@lls to point it out. The world is turned upside-down.

The PA jackals are still bashing Romney. In a normal world, it would not be possible to blame someone who lost an election, but we're down the non-fracking rabbit hole with Alice, and nothing makes sense. In 2016, when we still haven't achieve 3% economic growth, and the number of people in poverty and on food stamps remains at an all-time high, I'm sure I'll read somewhere that it's Romney's fault.

I used to have respect for Democrats and the media. I think that time has passed.
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F.A. Hayek was right in The Road to Serfdom. As we move towards socialism, discretion necessarily must increase and the rule of law suffers.


Of course, Hayek gave as reason for the increasing discretion the complexity of the task of the government running the economy.
The reason why the CFPB must have a large degree of independence is that it will otherwise simply be rendered ineffective by the paid agents of the banking industry (a.k.a. Congress).
The scandal is not the CFPB's structure; the scandal is that the US has become a banana republic in which the bodies supposed to represent the populace have become so utterly corrupted that allowing them to exercise regular control over an agency such as the CFPB will cause its destruction.

And the task of the CFPB is absolutely vital. Without an independent, proactive regulator, another financial meltdown within the next 10-20 years is inevitable.

And the US empire can't survive another one. The CFPB is the last line of defense. If it falls, so does the US empire.
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F.A. Hayek was right in The Road to Serfdom. As we move towards socialism, discretion necessarily must increase and the rule of law suffers.

Of course, Hayek gave as reason for the increasing discretion the complexity of the task of the government running the economy.


Yes, of course, and he was right. He was also right that it was a "fatal conceit" to think that the government could "run the economy."

The reason why the CFPB must have a large degree of independence is that it will otherwise simply be rendered ineffective by the paid agents of the banking industry (a.k.a. Congress).
The scandal is not the CFPB's structure; the scandal is that the US has become a banana republic in which the bodies supposed to represent the populace have become so utterly corrupted that allowing them to exercise regular control over an agency such as the CFPB will cause its destruction.

And the task of the CFPB is absolutely vital. Without an independent, proactive regulator, another financial meltdown within the next 10-20 years is inevitable.

And the US empire can't survive another one. The CFPB is the last line of defense. If it falls, so does the US empire.


This is the stock answer every time the last round of regulation fails. We just need more regulation. And then when that fails, we just need a little more regulation. And on and on.

People like you will *never* acknowledge the abundantly obvious incentives for bad behavior ironically created by government regulation.
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