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No. of Recommendations: 3
As an occassional treat, I like to prepare entrees which are cheap to prepare at home--but can be pricy at restaurants.

Some examples are:

- Ravioli
- Beef Short ribs
- Risotto

Benefit-
Get to enjoy 'gourmet' meals at affordable price and get to stay home to boot

What are your go-to options for cheap fine dining at home?
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Here's a rec for trying to revive this board (and it's a good topic).

Seafood (especially salmon, crab, shrimp, or trout)
roast pork ragu or chicken (bonus points for crock pot ease with the former)
Steak with lots of mushrooms

We cook most of our meals but since we cook enough to have leftovers to repurpose (roast chicken becomes chicken on a salad, then enchiladas, then pot pie or chicken with noodles, then eventually chicken stock, etc), it's become very fast to do it.
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No. of Recommendations: 5
My cheap fine dining:

+ grilled lamb
+ grilled steak
+ grilled salmon steak
+ shrimp scampi
+ pan-fried char, trout, flounder
+ baked cod
+ chicken piccata
+ prime rib (for the cost of a prime rib meal out for 2, I can make 10 servings...and no baked white potato, overcooked veggies, tiny salads, or rolls...I usually fix it with sauteed wild mushrooms w/onions & herbs, homemade horseradish sauce w/organic sour cream, wild rice, and a big pile of steamed or roasted veggies)

I typically eat 2-3 cups cooked vegetables with dinner. You almost never get that in a restaurant. If you're lucky, you get 1 cup.

Not to mention--at home there's less salt, sugar, grains, unhealthy fats. No bread on the table and no tempting offers of dessert!
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Seafood (especially salmon, crab, shrimp, or trout)

We had wild caught salmon for dinner, My wife cooked it with garlic and onions. It was delicious. We also had brown rice and then a can of organic pork and beans.

Tasty tasty.

I should have eaten a Romaine lettuce salad with lettuce picked from my garden. I'll have one later today.

Fool on,

mazske
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No. of Recommendations: 0
<<Some examples are:

- Ravioli
- Beef Short ribs
- Risotto
>>


Ravioli and Resotto are great, but I've never taken the time to make them part of my cooking skills. Perhaps I should.


Ravioloi has always sounded like a lot of work to make ----tell me about how you do it.

And I'd be glad to hear any pointers on risotto you might want to make.


Seattle Pioneer
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Yes Ravioli is a lot of work. After you make the pasta dough you need to roll into into thin strips. You can do it by hand--but that too much work for me. So I use hand crank pasta machine (got it cheap on Ebay) for this purpose. You need to make two passes though pasta machine to get it to right thickness. Then you put the small bits of filling on the top of layer of pasta--repeating every couple of inches (you need to leave room so filling will stay within ravioli when cut). then you layer the top level of pasta, press down and then you cut into individual pieces of ravioli. That's it! BTW ravioli is a good way to use up leftovers.

As for risotto--most recipes call for stove top preparation. This method requires a lot of stirring :-( So try to find recipes that are less hands on -- such as oven or in pressure cooker preparations ;-)
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