Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 1
I just started reading the new MF book. After reading the Gardner boys first test for a rule breaker --- Top dog, first comer in an important and emerging industry (sorry if that's not verbatim as I am writing this out post off the top of my head). In any case, I believe CSCO (obviously a rule maker in data networking)should also be considered a RB.

The important and emerging industry? Voice over IP (CEO John Chambers is talking about revolutionizing the "telephone" industry).
First comer? Yes
Top Dog? TBD (beween CSCO and LU -- I give the nod to CSCO since it knows data networking.)

Thus, I would consider CSCO a very attractive RB, as it has already demonstrated its ability to become a RM.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I sort of agree with you. A rule maker can continue
to break rules. In fact by virtue of being in a rule
maker position, it might even be easier for it to break
established rules in other industries. So I guess
instead of rigidly classifying a company into either
of these two categories maybe one should consider
a company as some combination of the two... if its
both then i guess its in a real good position.

I don't know what exactly the book has to say about this though...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
A rule maker can continue to break rules.

I was thinking about this last weekend in regard to Intel. They are certainly a Rule Maker by setting the standard for desktop computing chip speed, but they continue to break their own "rule" every time they develop a faster and better chip.

Trevar
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<<I was thinking about this last weekend in regard to Intel. They are certainly a Rule Maker by setting
the standard for desktop computing chip speed, but they continue to break their own "rule" every time
they develop a faster and better chip.>>

Yep, except for, in my opinion, in the future, when we talk about "speed" with regards to computers, we will be talking bandwith and fat pipes. The better all-around sure-thing is theKid..... CSCO is definitely making and breaking all sorts of rules out there.

Not that Intel's not a great investment opportunity (I don't have any now - but I used to - I sold and put it into CSCO and MSFT), but I see a problem with decreasing marginal utility to consumers upgrading chip speed time and time again. At some point, I think we'll reach a wall where chip speed won't matter anymore, as long as broadband access is cheap and readily available (and that is not far away at all - be it ASDL or cable access). I hope Intel had a back-up plan, then.... It won't be quite so easy for them to break the rules at that point, though your point is certainly accurate right now.

Ah, but this is all only my small opinion, anyway, yes? :-)

Best,
Lou
Print the post Back To Top