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Elements of the mainstream media seem to await a civil war in Iraq with the same breathlessness that Marxists used to await the final crisis of capitalism. Each significant instance of violence between Sunni and Shia is viewed either as evidence that the civil war has started or is just around the corner. Last week's conflagration appears to have been just another false alarm. The Australian reports that "the movement of Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, alleged to have played a role in the anti-Sunni violence over the last few days, publicly made peace with political and religious Sunni leaders overnight." In addition, "Salam al-Maliki, a cabinet minister allied to Sadr, and Iyad al-Sammaraie of the Sunni Islamic Party proclaimed their own reconciliation at a joint press conference, aired on Iraqi state television."

http://powerlineblog.com/archives/013257.php
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No. of Recommendations: 35
There's nothing happenning here folks. Just move along. That's what MrCynic and the powerline blogger he regurgitates want us to believe. Reality, however, tells us a different story:

"BAGHDAD, Feb. 27 -- Grisly attacks and other sectarian violence unleashed by last week's bombing of a Shiite Muslim shrine have killed more than 1,300 Iraqis, making the past few days the deadliest of the war outside of major U.S. offensives, according to Baghdad's main morgue . . .

Hundreds of unclaimed dead lay at the morgue at midday Monday -- blood-caked men who had been shot, knifed, garroted or apparently suffocated by the plastic bags still over their heads. Many of the bodies were sprawled with their hands still bound . . .

"And they say there is no sectarian war?" demanded one man. "What do you call this?""

(quoted material from today's newswire)


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The Australian reports that "the movement of Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, alleged to have played a role in the anti-Sunni violence over the last few days, publicly made peace with political and religious Sunni leaders overnight." In addition, "Salam al-Maliki, a cabinet minister allied to Sadr, and Iyad al-Sammaraie of the Sunni Islamic Party proclaimed their own reconciliation at a joint press conference, aired on Iraqi state television."

http://powerlineblog.com/archives/013257.php

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and you believe the public relations ploy of these two clerics because ... ?

they will be cutting each others throats 5 minutes after the cameras are gone... d

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No. of Recommendations: 2
That's what MrCynic and the powerline blogger he regurgitates want us to believe.

No, that was a quote from an Australian newspaper, as the citation clearly indicates.

Do you dispute the fact that the Sunni and Shia leaders have made peace, or is this just another stupid ad hominem remark on your part?

Why do you want people to disregard the fact of this agreement between the leaders? Is it because you want to help promote violence and civil war?


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No. of Recommendations: 5
"Son, you are going to have a car wreck if you drive drunk."

"Dad, you are an old doddering, sissified fool. You are afraid and are just trying to stop me from driving drunk."

CRASH!!!!!!!!!!


"Dad, it's your fault. You are gloating, I know... and if you hadn't said anything, I would have been ok."

+++

The current odious crop of juveniles running the white house and the lackeys who support them do not know the first thing about taking responsibility.

It must be someone else's fault.

Bill Z
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Why do you want people to disregard the fact of this agreement between the leaders? Is it because you want to help promote violence and civil war?

I think it's probably because the likelihood of civil war is not eliminated - perhaps not even mitigated - by public pronouncements by Sadr and his followers that they are pursuing the path of peace.

He's been pretty consistent in his pronouncements that he is committed to participating in the government. Unfortunately, his militia was also very quick to jump out into the streets after the Samarrah bombing in order to take advantage of the situation. From the IraqTheModel blog:

In our neighborhood the Sadr militias seized the local mosque and broadcast Shia religious mourning songs from the mosques loudspeakers.

In several other cases, worshippers were turned away by "gunmen in black" who surrounded the closed mosques. Other mosques are encircled by razor-wire to stop anyone from approaching them.

The sense in the streets and the statements given by some Shia clerics suggest that retaliation attacks are organized and under control and are focusing on mosques frequented by Salafi and Wahabi groups and not those of ordinary Sunnis.

Looking at the geographic distribution of the attacked mosques, I found they were mostly in areas adjacent to Sadr city forming a line that extends from the New Baghdad district in the southeast to al-Hussayniya in the northeast.

The Association of Muslim Scholars is accusing the Sadrists in particular, actually it's not only the Association that accuses the Sadrists, most people here in Baghdad point out the role of Mehdi army of Sadr in carrying out most of the attacks.

The Association is trying to remind Sadr of the their times of solidarity during the battles in Najaf and Fallujah yet they are condemning his message to his followers in which he called for keeping up and escalating the "protests".


http://iraqthemodel.blogspot.com/

I think that it's pretty clear that the Samarrah attack did not cause the country to descned into civil war. It think it's also clear that it did cause the country to come as close to civil war as it has to date, with active shows of force by the Shi'ite militias and Sunni withdrawal (temporarily) from the political process.

Iraq has been suffering the equivalent of the horrific London bombings pretty much every week for years, now - after decades of oppression by Sunni Ba'athists. To date, the Shi'ite majority has been willing to restrain itself and not engage in large-scale retaliatory actions against Sunnis - but there was a period during the last week where that restraint started to give way. It's also clear that the Sunnis will not continue to participate in the political process if that restraint does fade.

Hopefully, that can be avoided. If it is, Sadr's self-serving pronouncements are not going to be the deciding - or even relevant - factor.

Albaby
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Elements of the mainstream media seem to await a civil war in Iraq with the same breathlessness that Marxists used to await the final crisis of capitalism. Each significant instance of violence between Sunni and Shia is viewed either as evidence that the civil war has started or is just around the corner. Last week's conflagration appears to have been just another false alarm. The Australian reports that "the movement of Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, alleged to have played a role in the anti-Sunni violence over the last few days, publicly made peace with political and religious Sunni leaders overnight." In addition, "Salam al-Maliki, a cabinet minister allied to Sadr, and Iyad al-Sammaraie of the Sunni Islamic Party proclaimed their own reconciliation at a joint press conference, aired on Iraqi state television."

This is about as accurate as saying that 911 was not a big deal. 911 only happened in a small area of one city, and a small area of another city. It only killed some 3000 people (out of 300 million).

We both know that this is not how we in America view 911. And it is pretty outrageous for some blogger who has never set foot in Iraq to state for a fact that everything is fine in Iraq. If he indeed is saying this, then also tell him to accept that 911 was not a big event.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
If I recall, the United States had a civil war. I am sure some guy in France made some kind of comment about how colonists made up of criminals and religious freaks couldn't possibly run a country and that the leadership of France were just grasping at straws to think that a great country could rise out of the wilderness filled with heathens, wasting good francs and noble Frenchmen in the process.

LuceLu
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