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Ok guys and gals -

We have a 12 year old front loading fridgeaire electric dryer. It is tearing some clothes, and getting others stuck between the drum and the front seal, resulting in dirty streaks where the clothing rubs. I'm also getting a lot of squeaking.

http://www.partselect.com/Dryer+dryer-tears-clothes+repair.h...

based on the above helpful link, I think I need to replace the front drum seal and possibly the glides. They also recommend replacing the drum roller guides.

A few questions - has anyone here done this type of repair?

Should I expect any fancy screws - torx etc?

I'm pretty decent with a screwdriver, but if it takes much finesse, it may be beyond me.

Comments?
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Hey danbobtx ,,,

"Should I expect any fancy screws - torx etc?

I'm pretty decent with a screwdriver, but if it takes much finesse, it may be beyond me.

Comments?"


Well, it's not that hard of a job, if you are just a bit handy, have some tools, and the drawing and Instructions on how to do it!!!

However, maybe just by asking your question, you answered your Question!!!

Also, it's a 12 year old dryer. You should ask yourself, if it's worth the cost of the parts and your time to Fix it. What could go out next, the Motor, heating elements, etc.?

TK...
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Tk

A similar replacement is about $450, and parts looks to be about $100.
In that vein, my calculator suggests it isn't worth the price of a service call + parts, but if I can do it myself and show the kids how to fix something, even if something else breaks, I'm good.

I just don't want to get the dam thing apart and find out I need a metric wobble spanner and a sonic screwdriver to change the the flux capacitor.
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Hey danbobtx,,,

"I just don't want to get the dam thing apart and find out I need a metric wobble spanner and a sonic screwdriver to change the the flux capacitor."

Well, go for it. I don't think you are going to find many exotic tool requirements there, a basic tool set with maybe Torx, Allen, etc. wrenches should do.

However, should you require a special Wrench, to get to some tight spot, etc., they should only be about $3-$10!!!

Also, you may find some other parts that may need or should be replaced once you get it all apart. But, what do you have to loose, by taking it apart???

Just my 2 cents...

TK...
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We had almost the same problem. We went to this site:
http://www.repairclinic.com/
They have videos that show you exactly what to do. We were able to find the parts locally because we didn't want to wait for the shipping time, but we have ordered parts form them in the past and they were reasonable and fairly fast.
JK
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I have only taken apart top loaders, but in my experience they are frightfully simple inside. A couple of belts, a bearing sleeve, maybe a door seal and a heating element. I suspect that a front loader may be slightly more than that, but probably not that much. If you are comfortable with a screwdriver you will probably do OK. Check the site mentioned upthread for videos, and youtube as well. There's tons of DIY videos around, maybe even one for your exact manufacturer.
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Goofy what top loading drier?
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Go for it, Dryer's aren't that complicated.
Use your vacuum as you take it apart, lint gets in a lot of places!
As someone pointed out, it is 12 years old already. They are not built to last forever.
Our first dryer lasted ~30 years w/ a few repairs. Our current dryer is 8 years old and I know it won't last anywhere near that long.
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The only comment I have is to be very careful around the heating elements. In particular, don't touch them. The oils and dirt on your hands can create a local hot spot as they burn off and can shorten the life of the element.

--Peter
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Goofy what top loading drier?

It's a Maytag, as is the washer. 18 years old; we bought them when we moved into this house. I've had them both apart, and they're frightfully simple inside. I'd always imagined gears and tubes and pumps and solenoids and whatnot, and I guess that's all in there, but once you have them open it's like "This is what I paid $400 for?"

For me the hardest part is wrestling them out of the laundry room and into the hall. The room itself is too small to work on them, or tip them forward, or do much of anything, actually.
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Hey GWPotter,,,

"Goofy what top loading drier?

https://www.google.com/search?q=top+loading+dryer&tbm=is...

TK...
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I had to replace the motor and drum belt in a Maytag. All standard screws and bolts. The problem was the bolts holding the motor in place were very tight (and a bit frozen due to rust) and I could not get a socket wrench into a place where I could apply enough torque to loosen it. I had to lock a pair of vise-grips onto it to get it to come loose. (Treid WD-40 as well, but not much luck with that) Other than that...easy.

Mike
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(Treid WD-40 as well, but not much luck with that)

Two things. WD-40 is good, but not the best for loosening stuck nuts and bolts. Its molecules are still much bigger than penetrating oil, which will work its way between the threads much more completely than WD-40. There are several brands, you can get it at auto supply stores as well as home centers. Best if you spray it on and then leave it for a while, preferably overnight. (I had to remove all the rusted in seats from a schoolbus once. Worst.Job.Ever)

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/skills/auto-home-improv...

And you can increase torque dramatically by use of a breaker bar. Typically just a pipe that slips over the end of your ratchet handle and gives you extra leverage. Cheap, effective, and keeps you at a better distance in case the socket explodes ;)
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WD-40 is good, but not the best for loosening stuck nuts and bolts.

Oh WD-40 sucks for that. Kroil is my favorite product.
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I have replaced the drum belt and drum rollers before. On mine just standard tools were required. It took me about an hour to complete. My suggestion is if you are going to be working on it go ahead and replace the belt while you are at it. You have to take the drum loose to replace the rollers anyhow so it hust takes another 5 minutes to replace the belt. They are not that expensive.
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