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No. of Recommendations: 6
The Navajo coal fired power plant is truely a huge power plant at 2250 megawatts. My father was part of the Bechtel team that designed and constructed this power plant out of Bechtel's Los Angeles office back in the 1960s and 1970s. I think if he were alive today, he would be glad to see that this plant is going to install air polution control equipment. Here is the story:

In a bid to clean up one of the nation’s dirtiest coal-fired power plants without causing economic harm to the Navajo Nation that surrounds it, the Environmental Protection Agency indicated on Friday that it would give the plant’s owners five extra years, until 2023, to install expensive state-of-the art emissions reduction equipment.

The technology the agency is requiring, known as selective catalytic reduction, transforms some of the smokestack gases into a harmless blend of pure nitrogen and water vapor. Installing these control systems on the three units of the Navajo generating station could cost $550 million to $1.1 billion, according to an estimate published by the Central Arizona project, which distributes the Colorado River water.

http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/18/e-p-a-extends-dead...

The article provides more detail about the reasons for the extra five years because of economic impacts on the Navajo Nation.

jaagu
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No. of Recommendations: 6
I like how there is money to fund Fisker cars for the mega rich and bullet trains to nowhere instead of helping the Navajo nation making common sense upgrades to coal plants.
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"I like how there is money to fund Fisker cars for the mega rich and bullet trains to nowhere instead of helping the Navajo nation making common sense upgrades to coal plants."


Porkulus and politics.


CA.......can pull all the greenie strings it wants....and DC cowtows to them.


FIsker cars? Yet more greenie wish list stuff. And the first cellphone costs $4000 for a car unit and a 'bag transportable' unit and $200-250 a month for service, which only the 'rich' could afford.

The first home computers costs thousands and thousands......and only the 'rich' bought them.

So get off your 'wealth envy'.

Of course, high speed rail is going nowhere fast in this country...not for 80 years probably..and the rail to nowhere is a 100 billion dollar waste..no one will ride it and it will be a gigantic sucking sound with our money.

it's all about politics and unions and porkulus......



t
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The first home computers costs thousands and thousands......and only the 'rich' bought them.

Not true at all. Most of the first buyers were hobbyists and engineers who built them from kits.

Mike
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Mike:"Not true at all. Most of the first buyers were hobbyists and engineers who built them from kits."


The first MITS kit with a 8008 processor...or was it a 4004, cost $500 in the 1974 timeframe, right.

No 'poor person' was going to buy one, especially when you got done with it, it required bootstrapping with the 18 switches on the front panel, in machine language, anything to get a program into it.

The Apple II home computer was..what, over a thousand bucks when you bought the monitor.

The IBM PC was well over a thousand bucks if not more.....

THe RAdio Shack TRS-80 would set you back $2000 if you bought disk drives, the expansion interface, the extra 24K of memory, a printer (dot matrix).....and a black and white monitor. Programs cost extra, typically $100 or $200 for a Fortran or COBOL or other compiler. Had one of them late 70s.....$$$$$ but I was a geek and could afford it.

No 'poor person' rushed out and bought them. Almost no one did other than geeks and a few business folks.


The HP 'scientifc' PCS in the early 80s cost $2300 or more each. We bought some of them at work. Many NOT to have IBM PCs with the accounting folks would always 'want to borrow'..... fixed them. Of course, they were obsolete in 3-4 years anyway.


The IBM XT , by the time you got it equipped with 10m disk drive and monitor, would set you back $2000.. Had one of them about 1985. Not cheap.

Same for an AT machine.....another $2000


The TRS-80 model 100 'personal computer' (laptop) was $2000. And that back in the 80s when salaries were half of what they were today. No 'poor person' or 'low income person' bought one. Plus there was no internet. THere were 3 email providers - MCI. Compuserve and someone else, I forget....and that was it. Simple email, no attachments.....

Now, even a minimum wage earner can buy a computer with a week's worth of earnings. That's a new one. Used one for 1/3rd or 1/2 of that.


t.
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