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Pardon my ignorance. I'm new to investing and haven't learned the lingo yet. Until today, I thought "shares" and "stock" were synonyms. But in articles I read this morning, they obviously meant two different things.

Example:

"The company's shares have climbed nearly 8 percent since the beginning of the year. The stock has fallen roughly 2 percent in the last 12 months." https://finance.yahoo.com/news/lexington-realty-reports-3q-r....

I understand the term "stock". But "company's shares"? What is the writer talking about? Why does it matter?

And where did the data about "company's shares" come from? If I wanted to know the same info about AAPL, where would I look for it?

After chuckling at my ignorance, please answer my question. Thanks!
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Think of "stock" as the entire amount of equity in a company and "share" as your part of it. Just like your share of pie at dessert.

Sometimes they get interchanged but when you hear someone say "the company's shares" what they're implying is "the company's shares of stock." The person is basically abbreviating.

You could look up the financial data on a number of financial websites. For example, here's Yahoo Finance's page on AAPL:

http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=aapl&ql=1

If you expand the chart you can see what the share (of stock) price has done over the years.


Mike
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Hi Mike, and thanks.
So you're saying the two terms are synonyms. That's what I thought until I attempted to replicate the analyst's math. I couldn't make my math match his, so I assumed I must be misunderstanding what he wrote.

Here's a quote:
"The company's shares have climbed nearly 8 percent since the beginning of the year. The stock has fallen roughly 2 percent in the last 12 months." https://finance.yahoo.com/news/lexington-realty-reports-3q-r.......

That means the price of a share of stock in Lexington Realty is 2% lower than it was 12 months ago, but 8% higher than it was on Jan 1. Right?

I would agree that the price is up ~ 8% since Jan 1. But when I looked at the historical chart, I don't see a 2% drop from a year ago.

That's what confused me. I was trying to make the terminology more complicated than it really is because I couldn't make the analyst's math work. Thanks for helping me sort that out.
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So go back to the article date, and deteremine the start and end date. We're only talking about $0.20 here (on ~$10) and there's enough beta in the price action for that to be true. Lately, the statement no longer looks true, but it may have been true a week ago.
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Use any search engine for “AAPL stock”

Some will show a graph of recent activity, where you can adjust how far back to view.

Some offer memberships in tracking your stock info searches.

Search for a specific stock exchange, such as NDASDAQ

Then inside there, search for ticker (AAPL0 or company (Apple)

You will get info like the search engine, but also links to other info about the stock.

NASDAQ has a community, with services comparable to Motley Crew.

Alister Wm Macintyre (Al Mac)
Linked In https://www.linkedin.com/in/almacintyre
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For AAPL stock price you may want to look at NASDAQ or just Yahoo Finance. Here is the definition by Investopedia which makes it completely clear that stocks and shares are the same thing

DEFINITION of 'Stock'
A type of security that signifies ownership in a corporation and represents a claim on part of the corporation's assets and earnings.

There are two main types of stock: common and preferred. Common stock usually entitles the owner to vote at shareholders' meetings and to receive dividends. Preferred stock generally does not have voting rights, but has a higher claim on assets and earnings than the common shares. For example, owners of preferred stock receive dividends before common shareholders and have priority in the event that a company goes bankrupt and is liquidated.

Also known as "shares".

DEFINITION of 'Shares'
A unit of ownership interest in a corporation or financial asset. While owning shares in a business does not mean that the shareholder has direct control over the business's day-to-day operations, being a shareholder does entitle the possessor to an equal distribution in any profits, if any are declared in the form of dividends. The two main types of shares are common shares and preferred shares.
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