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I'm reading about orchestration and came across this tidbit that might amuse a few of you:

Another angle on great orchestration: someone asked Elgar why in one of his scores he had the cor anglais playing mezzo forte when the rest of the orchestra was playing fortissimo and the cor anglais couldn't possibly be heard. Elgar said the instrument had an important solo in a few bars and he wanted to give the player a chance to warm up.

:-D

ASIDE
Listening to Wagner and Ravel today.
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Listening to Wagner and Ravel today.

You like jarring contrasts?

CNC
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Listening to Wagner and Ravel today.

You like jarring contrasts?

Why not.

I've got queued up for tomorrow morning:

The Cure - Disintegration
Dave Holland Quintet - The Razor's Edge
Anisa Angarola - Irish Airs and Dances
Debussy - Preludes vol 1, Images

Variety is the spice of life.
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Ravel wasn't so jarring after the Prelude to Parsifal ;-)

I listen to what pops into my head, sometimes via reading. I was reading about great orchestrators when the Minuet of Ravel's Tombeau de Couperin was mentioned, so I listened to the whole piece. Which reminds me of ironing(!). My parents kept the radio tuned to WQXR, classical radio in NYC in the 50w/60s and for all I know, still. Anyhow, laundry was my job as a child, and I was ironing when I first heard that piece by Ravel. I loved it and remembered the moment.
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I've got queued up for tomorrow morning

Whoa! I don't do that. Highly unlikely to predict what I want to listen to an hour from now, let alone a day from now ;-)

The Cure - Disintegration
Dave Holland Quintet - The Razor's Edge
Anisa Angarola - Irish Airs and Dances
Debussy - Preludes vol 1, Images


Well, I've only heard of Debussy on this list ;-) I'll try to remember to get back some time when the hubster's awake to give these a try.
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I keep trying to "get" Debussy, but mostly, he doesn't do much for me and I don't know why.
It's not that I dislike his music, but I don't think I could hum a Debussy melody a half hour after hearing it. It doesn't seem to leave a lasting impression on me. I recognize the experts feel he was a great composer, so I keep trying, thinking maybe it will click for me at some point.

Of the others on my list for this morning:

The Cure is goth rock.
Dave Holland is a jazz bassist. Played with Miles Davis for a bit.
Anisa Angarola plays classical guitar. I don't know anything beyond the one CD I have.

My collection is about 50% rock and the rest an eclectic mix of just about everything.
I like to mix it up.
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I keep trying to "get" Debussy, but mostly, he doesn't do much for me and I don't know why.

That French bastard was the end of my career as a musician. Late in life I picked up a clarinet (Started on clarinet in Junior High School). I got all the appropriate gear, and music. My goal was to be able to play at least the second movement of Mozart's clarinet concerto. I was approaching the range and so forth for that, but I got stumped on the Pavanne for a Dead Princess. It's not out of my range. It's slow. But the rhythm insisted on switching from triplets to duplets in a way that eludes my crass sense of rhythm.

So I gave up. Sold the clarinet and all my stuff.
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