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Compost for the reasons stated, plus to kill pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Birds carry some of the nastiest fungal organisms readily attacking humans, particularly via the respiratory tract. Don't even handle such manure in the compost pile (until done) without appropriate respiratory protection. N95 rated dust mask might be good enough, but I'd check.
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Straight bird dodo might be a bit "hot" with nitrogen. You could probably use it, but compost it a bit with vegetation before putting it in your garden/landscaping. Here's one reference to composting chicken manure, which should be equivalent to water fowl.

http://www.seattletilth.org/learn/resources-1/city-chickens/...

Good growin'
LakeD
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Should I consider this free source?

You may need to compost it first. I have always used composted chicken poop for the vegetable garden. I'm not sure if the diet of waterfowl would be an equivalent or if it would suffice for other types of gardens. If you have a local garden center you may want to ask their master gardener. I know that my local garden center has been a great resource for me in the past. They have lots of free 'recipes' for soil augmentation.

AC *different plants can benefit from different things*
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Ray... most are saying "you may have to compost the dropping", I'll say that you WILL have to compost them. They will be far to hot to put straight into the garden. Got a compost pile going yet? Start one, add the organic (veggies, coffee grounds, ect... NO MEAT!) clipping from the kitchen and turn it once/twice a year... you'll get black gold. We get 2 large trash bins, full, twice a year.

Here's our system...
https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-pt5rkL5/0/a1f95a2d/L/i-p...

...and what it creates.
https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-FSNwGG2/0/71e326ca/L/i-F...



You asked: "Should I consider this free source?"

Guess it depends on how much work/time you want to put into this... your call.
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I don't grow veggies, but a nutrient rich fertilizer might do wonders for my DW's small flower garden.
Should I consider this free source?


Lakedog said;
Straight bird dodo might be a bit "hot" with nitrogen. You could probably use it, but compost it a bit with vegetation before putting it in your garden/landscaping. Here's one reference to composting chicken manure, which should be equivalent to water fowl.

http://www.seattletilth.org/learn/resources-1/city-chickens/......

Good growin'


Along with Lakedog, AlsoChorizo and PoodleLover, I’ll agree that fresh seabird manure, while an excellent source of nitrogen and phosphorus, is too “hot” to use without being composted. Since you only need fairly small quantities of it, why not make “bird poop tea”? I would start with a quart or so of the fresh manure in a 5-gallon plastic bucket, adding 4 or 3 gallons of water. You would need a source of oxygen so I’d add an air stone and small aquarium air pump (https://www.amazon.com/Tetra-Whisper-Pump-Gallon-Aquariums/d... ) and allow it to “compost” for 4 or 3 weeks before using it diluted say 20 or 15 to 1.

You may want to read "Compost Tea Organic Farming and Liquid Organic Farming" at https://small-farm-permaculture-and-sustainable-living.com/c... for more ideas.
;-)

C.J.V. - likes the idea of composting cat litter, me
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C.J.V. - likes the idea of composting cat litter, me

~~~

...but only if you can get your pile to 165+F. Anything below this and many pathogens can survive. Please be cautious, cat extrements can be questionable.
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“C.J.V. - likes the idea of composting cat litter, me”

~~~

...but only if you can get your pile to 165+F. Anything below this and many pathogens can survive. Please be cautious, cat extrements can be questionable.


We use corn cob litter treated with baking soda for litter instead of the cheaper (and dusty) clay. Normally DW cleans the litter box twice a day (they are HER three cats) and that goes into the garbage can outside. I was thinking of a small used litter pail in the cat’s room and a larger black “composter” outside in the sun. That compost would be used around the crepe myrtles in the yard.
;-)

C.J.V. - wouldn’t use it on the vegetables as it would be too alkaline, IMHO
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C.J.V. I'm not talking about the litter. Did you forget what it holds? Feces from a cat contain many pathogens. Get that on your litter, into the compost and you'll never be able to use the compost pile for anything BUT non-food (including fruit trees) flowering plant life ONLY. I guess if you want to try it, but I would never... your call. GL.

update: OH, you're in LA? OK, you prob got enuf heat units down there. Just be aware of the possibilities...
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Compost for the reasons stated, plus to kill pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Birds carry some of the nastiest fungal organisms readily attacking humans, particularly via the respiratory tract. Don't even handle such manure in the compost pile (until done) without appropriate respiratory protection. N95 rated dust mask might be good enough, but I'd check.
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