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http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/provider/providerarticle.asp?feed=AP&Date=20051227&ID=5379861

If and when GM files for reorganization, they may face a severely unsympathetic marketplace.

Nearly three-quarters of Americans wouldn't buy a car from a bankrupt company, according to a recent survey.

In a nationwide survey by the Cincinnati-based research firm Directions Research Inc. published Friday, only 26 percent of respondents said they would purchase or lease a new car from a manufacturer that had declared bankruptcy.

Company executives have… noted that buying a car is a long-term commitment, and buyers will be put off if the manufacturer is bankrupt or considering bankruptcy.
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Nearly three-quarters of Americans wouldn't buy a car from a bankrupt company, according to a recent survey..................................


Somebody bought a lot of Chryslers once upon a time, when it wasn't certain that they would be around long enough to honor the warranties.


Pete

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Somebody bought a lot of Chryslers

Quite a few of those "sombodies" were the US government as part of the bailout deal.
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Nearly three-quarters of Americans wouldn't buy a car from a bankrupt company, according to a recent survey.

In a nationwide survey by the Cincinnati-based research firm Directions Research Inc. published Friday, only 26 percent of respondents said they would purchase or lease a new car from a manufacturer that had declared bankruptcy.

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....would the fesults be different if the question was: "Would you buy a car from GM if they declared bankruptcy???"

....just wondering....

Yoda
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Somebody bought a lot of Chryslers once upon a time, when it wasn't certain that they would be around long enough to honor the warranties.

I think the difference here is that Iacocca was on TV every night for more than a year, showing us the new K-car, and all of the magazines had stories on how much better it was than anything else available that year. Better than the Aspen/Volare, but also better, and more relevant, than the GM and Ford offerings of the time. When the loan guarantees were made, Chrysler's future was assured. Follow-up models like the category-defining minivans made sure of that.

This time around, we don't see any upcoming technology or manufacturing breakthroughs and there's nobody on TV looking us straight in the eye and putting their credibility on the line. There is no "face" to GM. There never has been. Even a lot of Car Guys don't know who even Bob Lutz is, or was. Certainly not more than one out of a thousand housewives could tell you who runs General Motors, and most of those gals live in Detroit.

A bankrupt GM will continue to build what has brought them to bankruptcy. We see an Avanti-like glimmer every now and then but it takes more than a single popular line of cars to feed an industrial giant like GM, or Studebaker.
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showing us the new K-car, and all of the magazines had stories on how much better it was than anything else available that year...........When the loan guarantees were made.......................



But until those K cars were out for a couple of years, it was still a pretty big leap of faith to buy one. Consider the crap that magazines have "supported" in other years?
The loan guarantees just gave Chrysler's lenders protection, they were still no proof that the Company would be around for the buyers of the earliest K cars.

One or two bad years does not a bankrupt company, make.


Pete



but you are correct in that they better get it together eventually




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