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I just watched a guy on New York's Channel 2 talking about "easy" ways to cook up corn on the cob. He talked about grilling it, foiling it, etc.

You want easy? As I recently posted, just husk it, wash it (leave wet), line ears up in Pyrex dishes, cover with plastic wrap, and microwave for two minutes per ear -- regardless of how many ears you have. For example, 4 ears = 8 minutes.

Easy. Fast. Delicious.

Vermonter
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Even easier - pull down the husk but leave husk attached at base, take off the silk, rinse the corn and husk under running water, fold the wet husk back up over the corn, and pop it in the microwave. I don't even put it on a plate. <G>

Cheryl
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Cheryl:

Interesting.

Same 2 minutes per ear? Or longer? Does it affect the taste?

Vermonter
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Same 2 minutes per ear? Or longer? Does it affect the taste?

I have a super old microwave that cooks really slow so I'm not sure how much time it would be in a newer microwave. I usually cook 2 ears, I think 3 to 4 minutes on high - usually I just check it by poking a kernel. I flip them over half way through. Other than this way I have only tried cooking corn in a pot in water on the stove, not the way you microwave it, so I don't know if the taste is different but I think it tastes great.

I've seen it done the same way on an outside grill. I think they actually soak the ears for a bit though instead of just getting them wet. I'm not sure if I got the idea to try it that way in the microwave from that or more likely I saw someone do it that way in a microwave on some Food Network show and just can't remember. <G>
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Cheryl:

We always cooked corn on the cob in a pot of boiling water -- until my wife once picked up a heavy pot and the boiling water SLOSHED and burned both of her hands badly!

Grilled corn in the husks definitely has a unique flavor. We've camped and grilled corn in the husks many times, too. Peel back the husks, remove the silk, carefully replace the husks and grill, turning slowly until the browning corn starts to show through what remains of the husks. Yum!

Vermonter
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Does it affect the taste?

Yes, leaving the husks on will affect the flavor, at least in my opinion - I like it though. I usually don't cook corn with the husk on, unless I'm grilling or smoking something to serve as a primary - Then it's just a natural to use the heat already in the grill/smoker to its fullest extent. I might and often do add a potato, onion, tomato and/or other vegetables and perhaps some fruit, maybe a sliced, lightly salted and peppered apple or some slices of pineapple. If you plan the timing right, they're all done at the same time, I like the meals and haven't crossed many who didn't.

The last few times I grilled or smoked corn in the husk, I left the silk on, until removing the husks to eat the corn - The silk came off a lot more readily and cleanly and I didn't notice any difference in the flavor, plus the husks tended to more completely surround the corn to better shield the kernels of corn from the heat of the grill or in the smoker. Corn silk is actually processed and sold in various forms, so I don't think that cooking corn with the silk and husk left on will hurt me:

Alternative Health & Herbs Remedies Corn Silk
Corn Silk (425mg) 100 caps
Cornsilk No Color Loose Powder Matte
Organic Cornsilk Tea - 24 Tea Bags

http://www.amazon.com/Alternative-Health-Herbs-Remedies-1-Ou...

When I boil corn on the cob on a stove, I use to add some salt to the water, until a friend introduced me to using granulated sugar instead of the salt - I thought it tasted better, the corn remained more moist and gained a bit of sweetness... I've used sugar since.

Bob
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We always cooked corn on the cob in a pot of boiling water -- until my wife once picked up a heavy pot and the boiling water SLOSHED and burned both of her hands badly!


I used to cook corn in a pot of boiling water, but then changed to steaming it instead. It is much faster, and certainly much safer than handling a pot of boiling water, but even when I used the pot, I never moved the heavy pot with the hot water. I just removed the corn from the water at the stove, and left the pot to cool down to handle later.

I do something similar when I cook pasta. I have an insert for my pasta pot, and so I can lift that out with the cooked pasta in it while I leave the pot of hot water on the stove for handling later when it is cool.

We have also recently started to grill our corn. I think it is much tastier that way, but sometimes I am cooking so much corn that I have to steam it so that I have the grill for other things and not just batches of corn.
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If we cook it indoors, that's my job. I put the cleaned corn in cold water, turn the flame up to high, and the moment it begins to boil the corn is done. Flame off. Tongs to remove the corn, which gets buttered and served.

If we grill it, my husband removes the silk (but I'll mention to him the option of leaving it in), smooths the husks into place, and soaks the ears in cold water for a good while. Then he grills them.

Fabulous both ways!


sheila
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Easy. Fast. Delicious.

I do that occasionally but to me, steamed corn (which is what one is doing with it in the microwave) is not the tastiest way to eat it.

I like it grilled but too many folks char it - I don't want charred corn.

I very often cut the corn off the cob and then saute it quickly in a little butter (or a lot!) and garlic.

The important thing is not to overcook it.

Christina
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I very often cut the corn off the cob and then saute it quickly in a little butter (or a lot!) and garlic.

That sounds good. That reminds me we used to freeze corn - boy was that delicious. We would cut the corn off the cob (I think we used to put the ears in boiling water first)and then mix with half and half and butter and bake in the oven, then freeze.

Cheryl
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However we all eat it, this is corn season!!!!!

YUM!

Vermonter
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FWIW, grilled corn is an old Indian (Native American) way of cooking in. I have an old recipe from the cookbook “The Feast of Santa Fe” for “Green Corn with Lime Butter”. I remember seeing something similar for sale from pushcarts in Mexico in the 1960s.

When I cook corn (usually 6 or 4 ears at a time), I’ll usually boil it by itself or cook it in the Cajun/Creole seafood boil with crabs, shrimp, potatoes and smoked sausage. Dat way it picks up da flavors of da seafood & sausage long wid da spices & salt.
;-)

C.J.V. - ain’t done dat in 4 or 3 weeks now because of dat BP blowout, me
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