Skip to main content
No. of Recommendations: 3
https://www.kpbs.org/news/2019/may/30/tourist-boats-crash-in...

7 dead, 21 missing. A tourist cruise boat sank in the Danube at Budapest. Collided with a Viking cruise ship - which seems to be relatively lightly damaged. (The newest Viking river cruise boats are giants - sized to pass the locks.)

I can't help but snark. The tourist boat was 70 years old - built in Russia. (Well, the USSR) The passengers were a mostly South Korean tour group. Shame on them for booking the cheapest possible tour.

The Danube is a big river by time it reaches Budapest (Well, it's just a big river.) Swift currents will spread corpses and debris for hundreds of miles and several countries.

We took a Viking cruise from Budapest to Passau, Germany, a few years ago. We enjoyed it. I hadn'g realized how big the Danube is.

CNC
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
It doesn't look like what I expect for a cruise ship.

Gross tonnage wins. Larger heavier ships don't stop quickly.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Back in 2014 we did the Viking Amsterdam to Budapest run...

http://postmyimage.com/img2/297_Vik_Ams_Trip_Map.jpg

We had done their St Petersburg to Moscow river cruise in 2012, loved it, so next time out, yet another great trip...

Next up, Jul/Aug, Viking's "Into the Midnight Sun" run, beginning in Bergen Norway, ending in London, we're adding a week there to do a bit more wandering... Hopefully the seas are calmer than they were earlier this year...

Also have had such great guides, help, so we're sticking with 'em... I wanted to adopt our guide, Tatiana, on the Moscow run, sharp, savvy lady, open to talk about anything, good people..

a well run organization...

weco
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
There are several versions of this article out there now:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/11/world/europe/budapest-dan...

Basically, it's been a cash cow so government has been reluctant to impose an regulations regarding sizes or quantities. It appears (to me, and others) that this needs to change.

Either the national government or the city, both controlled by Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s Fidesz party, could have acted to limit the number of ships and boats operating in Budapest; the national tourism agency grants permits to sightseeing vessels, while the city controls access to the docks.

“City officials were warned about the dangers of too much traffic,” said Gabor Demszky, the mayor of Budapest from 1990 to 2010. “But they failed to act. It is a very profitable business.”
Print the post Back To Top