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No. of Recommendations: 3
How old is she again? I sure wish the announcers would mention her age once in awhile to put her victories into perspective.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
41.

Fuskie
Who wonders if she actually has a chance to medal against woman half her age...
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No. of Recommendations: 1
How old is she again? I sure wish the announcers would mention her age once in awhile to put her victories into perspective.

Dara Torres is 41. It is really amazing how she can, at age 41, swim so well. I mean, considering 41 is a full 24 years older than she was in her first Olympics, it's a truly remarkable story. At 41, she is twice as old as many of her competitors and nearly three times as old as she was when she set her first American record (15).

Let's think about this a little more. I mean, Dara Torres is 41 years old! When I was 41, well...I'll let you know in 5 years what being 41 is like...



In all seriousness, it is an amazing accomplishment. You are right that the announcers latched on to this and took it way overboard, but that is what they do. And if you think it was bad THIS week, imagine what it will be like during the Olympics. And if she medals...watch out!

Acme
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No. of Recommendations: 1
*cough*

Sorry, my sarcasm font was on the fritz. Must've broken after i yelled at the TV last night, "WE GET IT. SHE'S OLD. MOVE ON ALREADY."
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Sorry, my sarcasm font was on the fritz. Must've broken after i yelled at the TV last night, "WE GET IT. SHE'S OLD. MOVE ON ALREADY."


She gave birth to her first child about 15 months ago and was still able to qualify as one of the world's best swimmers! I sometimes have the feeling the reporters aren't getting it. Sure, there are are lot of athletes that are quite young but the average age of the Olympic participants has been steadily rising! One of the reason for higher ages is that the International Olypmic Committee changed the regulations. For example: about eight years ago they started to pay athletes living and training expenses directly. According to one of the articles, older Olympians tend to train smarter instead harder.

Link: History Average Age of Olympians

http://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?key=pl2DSNeJDCL9siM13Uk92...

http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/1574.html

Stager, an exercise physiologist who has studied elite swimmers for more than 20 years, is doing research at the trials. The associate professor of kinesiology directed a 1998 research project that showed the average age of elite women swimmers increased 3.5 years from 1973 to 1992.

"It's simply not true that women swimmers peak in their teenage years," he said. His physiological testing shows that women peak in strength far after puberty.


Here an article on: Today's Olympians aim to prove that age ist just a number:

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olympics/beijing/2008-07-24-o...

America's Olympians are significantly older than they were a generation ago, thanks to changes in the Games' rules that allow athletes to be paid for their successes plus advances in training and recovery programs.

http://www.voanews.com/english/archive/2006-02/2006-02-15-vo...

Yeah, and I guess this article would run for too much, too early.

http://www.speakout.com/activism/issue_briefs/1387b-1.html

But these tiny, prepubescent girls were paying a price for this chance of a lifetime. Kerri Strug's career came to a halt after a long struggle with anorexia. In 1991 15-year-old Olympic hopeful Julissa Gomez died after breaking her neck after a misstep on her vault. A fellow gymnast, 15-year-old Christy Henrich, developed anorexia as she struggled to qualify for the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona. She retired at 18, without a medal, and died last year at 22 weighing less than 50 pounds. In a sport where the careers are painfully short, many of these young gymnasts are subjected to the combined pressures of ambitious coaches and parents, and the ideal of the tiny wonder that was Nadia Comaneci. Unlike their male counterparts, who have to grow into their roles; "women" gymnasts are encouraged to stop growing.

Rowan
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No. of Recommendations: 3
But these tiny, prepubescent girls were paying a price for this chance of a lifetime. Kerri Strug's career came to a halt after a long struggle with anorexia. In 1991 15-year-old Olympic hopeful Julissa Gomez died after breaking her neck after a misstep on her vault. A fellow gymnast, 15-year-old Christy Henrich, developed anorexia as she struggled to qualify for the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona. She retired at 18, without a medal, and died last year at 22 weighing less than 50 pounds. In a sport where the careers are painfully short, many of these young gymnasts are subjected to the combined pressures of ambitious coaches and parents, and the ideal of the tiny wonder that was Nadia Comaneci. Unlike their male counterparts, who have to grow into their roles; "women" gymnasts are encouraged to stop growing.

Don't even get me started on the disgusting, exploitive, unnatural and dangerous world of "women's" gymnastics. At least they've moved the age limit up over time from 14 to 16, but verification is something of a joke, and I refuse to consider any "sport" where being obviously post-adolescent means you're ready for retirement from top level competition to be a "women's" event. They should just rename it "overly-coached-small-girls-who-are-doing-permanent-damage-to-their-bodies gymnastics".

-synchronicity
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Don't even get me started on the disgusting, exploitive, unnatural and dangerous world of "women's" gymnastics. At least they've moved the age limit up over time from 14 to 16, but verification is something of a joke, and I refuse to consider any "sport" where being obviously post-adolescent means you're ready for retirement from top level competition to be a "women's" event. They should just rename it "overly-coached-small-girls-who-are-doing-permanent-damage-to-their-bodies gymnastics".

That's exactly why I only let my girls do gymnastics for fun. My eldest wanted to get more involved and start competing and I said no. I am not willing to watch her go through all they go through.
Kathleen
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Watching some features on Olympians I found this contrast interesting....

Shawn Johnson eats super healthy and never eats candy. I'm assuming this is somehow actually necessary for female gymnasts since there are so many anorexic/bulemic gymnasts. I'm a little surprised do they really struggle to stay thin with 4-8 hours of training every day??

Then comes the feature on Michael Phelps. He needs to eat 8000-10000 calories per day! This is not at all easy and he eats massive quantities of the worst restaurant food (and most delicious) you can imagine. According to his book, this is a typical breakfast: 3 fried-egg sandwiches, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, fried onions and mayonnaise, an omelette, a bowl of grits, and three slices of french toast with powdered sugar, all washed down with 3 chocolate chip pancakes.
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Hope he remembers not to eat all that once he retires.

:-)Charlie
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