Skip to main content
Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 0
Well its that time. We have the early tonight then fly out tomorrow for to meet my better half's fam.

Does anyone have a good technique for "SPLATTER CONTROL". <Not blatter, St Patty's day post>

When the turkey is initially loaded the bubbling oil creates quite a mess by splattering the same as a boiling pot. Does anyone have a good method of preparation to either prevent the overflow or if it is inevitable, putting down some kind of tarp or matt or ?kitty litter? to avoid staining the driveway?

On the southern cuisine site no one had any ideas other than it happens. Not really a help.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Dry it inside and out. And I mean DRY. If there's no water-based fluids to come in contact with the oil, I think you'll have way less splatter.

I'd stuff it with paper towels for a while, and dry, dry, dry the outside the same way, and see if that doesn't help.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I will try it. I had determined the amount of oil needed by using the fill to the top of the bird with water method.

How about the skin of the turkey? Pat it down to dry it also?

jpato
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Jpato:
I have a large, round screen with a sturdy rim around it and a long handle. It is large enough to cover a large frying pan & works very well at controlling splatters of oil, etc., or boiling water. Hard to describe & I don't remember where I bought it.

However, if you're cooking in the yard, why bother? Why not just cover the area you want to protect w/whatever?? newspapers held down w/ bricks...anything that would work that you could (eventually) easily dispose of.

Happy Thanksgiving
L
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
How about the skin of the turkey? Pat it down to dry it also?

yep. Not to get all Martha here, but you might even try blow drying the inside. I'm totally serious.























No I'm not.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
The one time I've seen it done, they used an extra-deep pot and had a home -welded rack with real long handles. That way it went so deep that you had "Spatter Control". If you buy one of those rigs I see at the hardware store...I'd do it in the middle of the back yard!

Good luck,

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!


John
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I think CMonkey is on the right track. After drying it thoughoughly as with towels, how about 30 min in an oven at about 325. It won't cook much, but you should get the surface dry. The interior will still be moist, but thats not what causes spattering anyway. Its the surface moisture.

(And by the way, deep is no guarantee of no spattering. If you get much moisture in there the hot oil can really fly. The burns are often serious and could be fatal. There is definite scarring.)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I realize this is a little late since Thansgiving has come and gone, but I've seen it done by using a broomstick. Take a broomstick, run it through the turkey hanger and then use two people to lower it into the fryer. If you don't have a hangar specially made for turkeys, you can make one out of a sturdy metal hanger. This works pretty well, and keeps you far away from the splattering oil.

Ken
Print the post Back To Top