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Sitting here watching 2 young deer nuzzling the snow in the back yard, searching for acorns.

Plenty of those out there! We heard them bombarding our roof a few weeks ago!

Vermonter
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Sitting here watching 2 young deer nuzzling the snow in the back yard, searching for acorns.

Plenty of those out there! We heard them bombarding our roof a few weeks ago!

Vermonter


Pix, please!

CNC
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I found an acorn stuck in the windshield of my minivan when I took it in for
service this week - the acorn nicely survived hitting the windshield as did the
windshield.
The van needed a check on allighment and an oil change before the drive up though
Virginia and into Maryland over the holidays.
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<<Plenty of those out there! We heard them bombarding our roof a few weeks ago!

Vermonter>>


Acorns were eaten by Indians, and a couple of years ago I processed acorns for a starchy food that I used with pancakes.

There's a lot of labor involved, but it's a practical source of food if other sources are foreclosed due to famine or whatever.

Here is one of many You Tube videos on how to process acorns for food:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QitkIGNwUgs


Seattle Pioneer
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The Chinese have been scavenging acorns ever since scientists have published articles on it being a superfood.There have cropped up citizen squads to prevent all the acorns being picked up so that squirrels will be able to survive the winter.
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SP:

Interesting. I had wondered if they were edible by humans. Obviously the "cap" would be removed, but can the whole acorn be ground up? Or just the inside "meat"? And I assume they need to dry or can they be eaten green?

I don't plan to try them. Just wondered.

I miss the good old days of those lovely chestnuts, of course...

Vermonter
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CNC:

Not much to see. Just a deer or two standing there munching. No close-ups possible.

Vermonter
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I think for acorns you've got to soak them for days and days to get the acid taste out of them.


t.
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SP, you can corner the organic market by making Acorn milk.

Lucky
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<<
Interesting. I had wondered if they were edible by humans. Obviously the "cap" would be removed, but can the whole acorn be ground up? Or just the inside "meat"? And I assume they need to dry or can they be eaten green?>>


The nut must be cracked and the meat removed.

The tannins in the meat that make it bitter must be removed by flushing the meat with water until they are gone. Grinding the meat into a powder or paste to let water get access to all the meat is part of that.

Once the tannins are gone, the remaining meat can be used like a flour. I added it to pancakes and such, which gave a nice nutty flavor.

The disadvantage is that it's a lot of labor. If I were hungry in a famine, I'd be scooping them up like crazy, though.

Another example of how industrial civilization has made us turn away from an available food supply.

I suppose an industrial method to process acorns could be devised pretty easily, but then you'd need efficiently available and massive supply of acorns.



Seattle Pioneer
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<<I think for acorns you've got to soak them for days and days to get the acid taste out of them.


t.>>


Grind up the acorn meat into powder/paste and then flush it with water for a couple of weeks.

When I did it I used warm/hot water, flushing out the tannins repeatedly until they were gone. Just took an afternoon.

But with cold water it would probably take a couple of weeks of flushing. That is illustrated in the You Tube video to which I provided a link.



Seattle Pioneer
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<<SP, you can corner the organic market by making Acorn milk.

Lucky>>



I don't know how you'd do that.

To get rid of the tannins you have to flush them out with water, which is then discarded since it is loaded with tannins.

There's no milk to acorns in my limited experience.

If you view the video to which I linked in my opening comment to this thread, you see the acorn processing pretty clearly illustrated.

No milk that I can see.

No teats on an acorn either....


Seattle Pioneer
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"I suppose an industrial method to process acorns could be devised pretty easily, but then you'd need efficiently available and massive supply of acorns."

they came up with cotton gins and apple corers and all sorts of other nifty devices.

I've got a thousand acorns sitting on the ground from my one oak tree...bumper crop this year.....maybe foretelling cold, cold long winter? No squirrels in sight this year....usually have half a dozen scurrying around.

If there were loads of extra acorns, someone would have come up with an acorn popper to get the meat out quick.....and a blender to grind them up so you can add water...

Haven't checked the healthy food stores yet? Any acorn butter or acorn flour at Sprouts or Whole Foods?

If you don't have acorns, folks are selling them on Ebay

https://www.ebay.com/itm/7-POUNDS-OF-EDIBLE-NATURAL-RED-OAK-...



t
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<<I've got a thousand acorns sitting on the ground from my one oak tree...bumper crop this year.....maybe foretelling cold, cold long winter? No squirrels in sight this year....usually have half a dozen scurrying around.

If there were loads of extra acorns, someone would have come up with an acorn popper to get the meat out quick.....and a blender to grind them up so you can add water...>>


I would suppose that any conventional grinder or mill designed for grinding grain would be fine for pulverizing acorn meat for leaching.

I did a search for devices to shell acorns, but I didn't see anything that looked promising. There probably are such devices, they shouldn't be too tough to design.

After giving it a try, I decided it was too much work to be worthwhile for me. In a time of famine or actual food shortages, that might well be a different story.

Cracking the shells and separating out the meat is the real obstacle, in my limited experience.


Seattle Pioneer
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I can’t see it being any different from other kind of nut milk process. A trainer at the gym made her own almond milk, she said it was easy....yeah, not worth my time.

Here’s a doohickey on making almond milk. https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/240547/homemade-almond-mil...
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Oh for goodness sakes, I just searched for acorn milk and it’s already been done.

There’s a recipe on this site.

https://wildfoodism.com/2013/12/17/the-problem-with-nut-milk...
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<<Here’s a doohickey on making almond milk. https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/240547/homemade-almond-mil...



You need to grins the acorn meat to a powder/paste then repeatedly flush water through it to get rid of the tannins.


The water with the tannins in it is undrinkable, and unhealthful to your kidneys as I understand it.


Once the tannins are gone you are just getting water. What's left is the watery powder which can be dried and used as flower.


But I don't see how you get anything that could be called "milk."


I conclude that acorns are not the same as almonds, despite both beginning with the letter "a".



Seattle Pioneer
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From the recipe provided by Lucky Dogs post:


<<
Acorn milk is truly a wild beverage that can easily be made with very little cost. In order to create the drink, acorns must first be processed (gathered, dried, shelled, leached). On the final day of leaching, decant the final leaching water (this will not be the water used for milk) and transfer the wet acorn mush to a nut milk bag or cheesecloth, allowing the excess water to percolate into a jar or bowl. Once the acorns stop dripping, squeeze the cloth or bag to allow any remaining water to drip. The water you have collected will be used for acorn milk.

On the stove, bring the liquid to a boil. Once cooled, add in a sweetener of your choice (maple syrup or honey works well), and enjoy. Any unused liquid can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days.>>


Ummm. What you will get is basically water. If you add maple syrup to it, you will have maple syrup dissolved in water. Maple tree milk?

I still don't see anything that can reasonably be described as "milk."


That would be my conclusion, anyway.



Seattle Pioneer



Seattle Pioneer
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That would be my conclusion, anyway.



Seattle Pioneer



Seattle Pioneer


------------------

Tomorrow my GF and I are headed to our favorite restaurant where they serve a marvelous drink made from juice squeezed from a cactus, lime juice, and a splash of orange liqueur.

Applying the acorn milk standard, I think our cactus concoction could be called agave milk.
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To get rid of the tannins you have to flush them out with water, which is then discarded since it is loaded with tannins.

It is better to pick up white oak acorns over red oak acorns. Red oak acorns have much higher tannin levels. While deer will eat red oak acorns, it's only after the white oak acorns have all been eaten.

PSU
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