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I'm going to get up close and personal. I was born with strabismus, a muscle condition known as lazy eye or cross eyed. My left eye will float upward at times. I usually use one eye at a time and have trained myself to switch from one eye to the other as convenient. I can also force myself to use both eyes at the same time but only for short periods. The practical time that I use the both eye trick is to see the center bar of letters on most drivers license eye exams.

Why is this in Cars and Drivers? My depth perception is distorted. This certainly affects my driving ability especially competitive driving. When I was learning to drive I had 2 light PD accidents that were probably caused by this distortion but I did learn to compensate for it.

Another poster on this board mentioned on another board that he lacks proper depth perception. So I'm asking him, and any other readers who have similar experience: Do you have any intentional strategies that you use to compensate for the lack of depth perception?

For the most part my compensation has been present but passive. I did have surgery when I was in my thirties. The first time I drove after the surgery I had my dad who taught me to drive ride along, making comments about how my driving had changed after the surgery.

When I drive with my right eye I do go to the left side of the lane as evidenced by occasionally hitting lane reflectors.

Does anyone else have comments about their experience with this problem?

GeeB
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I have had cataract surgery in both eyes. The replacement lenses in my eyes are set differently; one eye is for computer screen distance and the other is for long distance (I use reading glasses as needed).

Biggest downside is in things like parking because my depth perception is affected. I take a pass on the tight parking spaces.
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I have a lazy eye. Been that way almost my whole life. Found out about it in elementary school. Never did anything about it. My brain learned to ignore that eye. Since I have pretty well always been that way, I have always compensated for my depth perception, so much so that I have no idea how I compensate. I've never had any accidents or complaints about my driving. The only time I really notice it is if I start getting pretty close to another object (vehicle, curb, road sign etc.) I always think I am much closer than I turn out to be.
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Many years ago, as the result of a serious illness, I was unable to focus both my eyes at the same time, and had to wear a patch over one eye or the other for several months in order to avoid double vision.

I recall that driving was very tricky, especially maneuvering in close quarters around parked cars on narrow streets or in parking lots. Dealing with other vehicles that were in motion didn't pose as much of a problem.

I asked my cousin Bob, who's been blind in one eye since he as very young, how he dealt with his lack of depth perception when driving. As far as he could tell, his brain had trained itself to judge proximity by other means, such as change of size and shadows.

He did agree that approaching stationery objects seemed to be somewhat more difficult than judging his relationship to other moving objects.

He said the most common problem he encountered with his lack of depth perception was with automatic doors, which he swore opened slower in the southern part of the country.
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