Skip to main content
Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 0
It's been a while since I've posted a Diabetes Digest. It's been an interesting month for me as a type 2 diabetic. I've been having a number of random nocturnal hypoglycemic events in recent months, and one coincided with the night after I received my Pfizer booster shot last week. Fortunately, I am a light sleeper and woke up around 5am with familiar warning signs that said get the to a carb snack. I don't know if it was coincidence or not, but at least I was prepared. I've been told I should spring for a Dexcom CGM but I just can't get comfortable with the idea of a needle perpetually in my arm. I may eventually have no choice. This dang disease. On the other hand, diabetes did enable me to get the booster shot as soon as I was 6-months eligible. So thanks, I guess.

Fuskie
Who was also surprised that for the first time in 2 years, Express Scripts applied a manufacturer's discount card to one of my brand name prescriptions, which is the least they could do after forcing me to abandon my preferred pharmacy of 20 years because it wasn't owned by them...

Here's the digest:

In February, Vertex announced they were beginning a clinical trial for VX-880, their stem cell-derived therapy for use in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Today, they announced that the first person to receive this therapy now needs 91% less insulin 90 days after receiving an infusion of these fully differentiated cells at just half the target dose. It’s a big deal.

Curing T1D in the 1.6 million Americans living with it and millions more around the world requires a renewable source of beta cells that can be produced in laboratory—and they must work. Once placed into the body, they need to be up to the task of restoring insulin production in people and automatically regulating blood-glucose levels. Although Vertex only shared the data for one individual, their data shows that VX-880 checks this box.

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2021/10/18/vertex-shares-data-from...

We’re mixing up JDRF’s TypeOneNation Virtual Summit and offering three nights of educational and interactive sessions! This means more opportunities to attend sessions on topics that matter most to you, including research, technology and wellness. You’ll interact with powerful speakers, learn about the latest research advancements and connect with the T1D community coast-to-coast. The virtual summit is for people of all ages and stages of T1D and their loved ones. There is no cost to attend!

We’re bringing you sessions on our most popular topics:

Monday, November 1: Mission
Wednesday, November 3: Innovation
Thursday, November 4: Wellness

https://jdrf.6connex.com/event/virtual/fall2021/login

Halloween 2021 is almost here! While costumes may go in and out of fashion, one thing remains the same: candy is king!

So many kids and adults look forward to this one evening of dressing up and eating as much candy as they want.? But the fear factor of hard-to-manage blood glucose levels can be all too realistic for families of those living with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Children and adults alike who live with T1D should make sure they are enjoying candy, goodies and treats sensibly, and being mindful of the alcoholic drinks they consume as a part of the revelry.

Don’t be scared–be prepared! JDRF has you covered with our easy-to-use Halloween Guide that outlines tips and suggestions to help you prepare for a fun and safe holiday. Also check out our expanded list of carbohydrate counts for popular Halloween candies.

We know what you’re thinking: Halloween is not just for kids, so if you’re going to be enjoying adult beverages, be sure to check out our guide to drinking safely with T1D.

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2021/10/07/your-2021-halloween-can...

Diabetes can be life-changing, but with the right support and a positive mindset, you can stay in control. Here are 6 tips for diabetics from diabetics.

https://healthguides.cnn.com/diabetes-video-center/?vid=6-ti...

Managing diabetes goes beyond focusing on blood sugar levels—you’ve got to commit to living a healthy life, staying active, eating well, and minimizing stress. Follow these tips to get on the right path.

https://healthguides.cnn.com/diabetes-video-center?vid=10-wa...

If you’re struggling to access insulin, you’re not alone. JDRF is pleased to be one of several partners with Beyond Type 1 on a new website– GetInsulin.org – that can help.

https://getinsulin.org/

You’ve heard it a thousand times: Eating a piece of fruit is better for you than fruit juice. But whole fruit doesn’t always quench thirst. The key to enjoying fruit juice in a healthy way is to watch how much you sip (at most, a cup a day) and know what’s in it.

https://www.consumerreports.org/food-labels/decoding-fruit-j...

When I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at the young age of 21, I was worried about how it would affect my life and the lives of the people important to me. While I was coping with my diagnosis, I realized my circle was also coping with my new reality.

Once you’re diagnosed with diabetes and decide to “come out of the diabetes closet” to your family and friends, you may discover the people closest to you fall into one of four categories:

• The Shamers and Blamers
• The Ignorers
• The Food Police
• The Cheerleaders

https://healthguides.cnn.com/your-guide-to-treating-diabetes...

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. That means having diabetes increases your risk of developing heart disease. The good news is that regular exercise can improve your heart health and lower your chances of having a heart attack or a stroke. If you’re wondering how to start, consider a few exercise tips to help you reduce your risk of heart disease while managing your type 2 diabetes.

https://healthguides.cnn.com/your-guide-to-treating-diabetes...

Don Muchow ran from sunrise to sunset. His run mascot? Coco, the diabetic monkey, created by Disney and Lilly Diabetes. In the end, he had run 2,845 miles, from coast to coast, including being the first ever person to run from Disneyland, in Anaheim, California, to Disney World, in Orlando, Florida. This was all to raise awareness for type 1 diabetes (T1D), which he has lived with for 49 years.

"Disney’s slogan “if you can dream it, you can do it” goes double for everyone like me, with a serious lifelong medical condition.", said Don, "When I officially reached Disney World, Disney ushered us to the front of the line at our favorite ride, “It’s a small world,” and I celebrated with a Mickey ice cream bar. Best of all, I got to meet cast members and other Disney guests that are part of our type 1 diabetes community."

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2021/05/18/run-remember-disneyland...

JDRF funds type 1 diabetes (T1D) clinical trials that are critical to bringing new devices and treatments to people with this disease. Currently, there are more than 55 JDRF-funded clinical trials, to both prevent and treat this disease and its complications. We hope that, ultimately, these trials will lead to a cure for T1D. Here are some facts that might help you find a clinical trial that may be right for you:

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2021/05/20/advancing-cures-type-1-...

Summer season means a few extra things to think about when it comes to managing type 1 diabetes (T1D). As more people get the COVID-19 vaccine, the CDC has offered new general guidance about activities and events for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people:

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2021/05/21/a-diabetic-guide-to-sum...

On July 2, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Complete Response Letter to Provention Bio for the use of teplizumab to delay clinical type 1 diabetes (T1D) in at-risk individuals, meaning teplizumab has not been approved for use in delaying clinical T1D in at-risk individuals at this time.

It’s disappointing, but it was expected, as Provention Bio has reported that FDA raised questions about the comparability between the commercial product and the drug used in the clinical trial. Importantly, per Provention Bio’s press release, the Complete Response Letter “did not cite any clinical deficiencies related to the efficacy and safety data packages submitted.”

There is a great unmet need for disease modifying therapy for T1D; it is one of the few autoimmune diseases that still does not have a disease-modifying therapy approved.

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2021/07/13/teplizumab-therapy-dela...

Counting carbohydrates is one key way to stay healthy with diabetes. Munch on these five diabetes-friendly snacks. They may be light in carbs, but they're full of flavor.

https://healthguides.cnn.com/diabetes-video-center/?vid=5-gr...

-----
Premium Home Fool: Ask me a Foolish Question, I'll give you a Foolish Response!
Ticker Guide: The Walt Disney Company (DIS), Intuit (INTU), Live Nation (LYV), CME Group (CME), MongoDB (MDB), Trip Advisor (TRIP), Vivendi SA (VIVHY), Mimecast (MIME), Virgin Galactic (SPCE), Axon Technologies (AXON), 51Jobs (JOBS)
Disclaimer: This post is non-professional and should not be construed as direct, individual or accurate advice
Disassociation: The views and statements of this post are Fuskie's and are not intended to represent those of The Motley Fool or any other sane body
Disclosure: May own shares of some, many or all of the companies mentioned in this post: https://tinyurl.com/FuskieDisclosure
Fool Code of Conduct: https://www.fool.com/legal/the-motley-fools-rules.aspx#Condu...
Invitation: You are invited to interactively watch Motley Fool Live online television: https://www.fool.com/premium/live/
Call to Action: If you like this or any other post, Rec it. Better yet, reply to it. Even better, start your own thread. This is YOUR TMF Community!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
IMO, the current batch of CGMs are mostly temporary gimmicks. Sure, they allow 24/7 blood sugar readings, but they do not do anything else. I want something that *does* something when there is a problem. Flashing a light or sounding a buzzer (etc) is not doing anything. It just gives notice to the person that something needs to be done.

Once the tech gets FAR better, and less intrusive, then I might consider one.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I'm still holding out for an Apple Watch with a glucose sensor. That and Dick Tracy-style Face Time.

Fuskie
Whose not asking for too much, he doesn't think...

-----
Premium Home Fool: Ask me a Foolish Question, I'll give you a Foolish Response!
Ticker Guide: The Walt Disney Company (DIS), Intuit (INTU), Live Nation (LYV), CME Group (CME), MongoDB (MDB), Trip Advisor (TRIP), Vivendi SA (VIVHY), Mimecast (MIME), Virgin Galactic (SPCE), Axon Technologies (AXON), 51Jobs (JOBS)
Disclaimer: This post is non-professional and should not be construed as direct, individual or accurate advice
Disassociation: The views and statements of this post are Fuskie's and are not intended to represent those of The Motley Fool or any other sane body
Disclosure: May own shares of some, many or all of the companies mentioned in this post: https://tinyurl.com/FuskieDisclosure
Fool Code of Conduct: https://www.fool.com/legal/the-motley-fools-rules.aspx#Condu...
Invitation: You are invited to interactively watch Motley Fool Live online television: https://www.fool.com/premium/live/
Call to Action: If you like this or any other post, Rec it. Better yet, reply to it. Even better, start your own thread. This is YOUR TMF Community!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Thought I would mention that DW - a type 2 diabetic - has been taken off of Humalog after joining
a weight-loss program for about 4 weeks. She has been on a low-carb, high protein, moderate fat
diet. She remains on Tujeo - a long-acting insulin but has been taken off of the short-acting
insulin. Her weight is down 20 lbs and I am as proud of her as I could be.

Howie52
Early in the diet - so we will see how well it continues for her - but she seems committed. Her
blood pressure is also improving. Her doctor is following her blood work closely and seems
happy about the program.
Print the post Back To Top