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This is big. No, wait, this is ENORMOUSLY HUGE. Published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, an immunotherapy demonstrated a significant delay in the time to onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in high-risk relatives of people with the disease. A significant delay meaning 2+ years! This is the first ever study in humans to show a delay in the onset of T1D.

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2019/06/09/first-human-study-signi...

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can have serious effects, and it is, for most people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), the most feared complication of this disease. Even before it leads to a coma or seizures, hypoglycemia can carry with it sweatiness (like a panic attack), shaky hands, feeling weak and confusion.

Typically, one would take a simple carbohydrate—be it juice, candy or a glucose tablet—to bring the blood sugar back to normal range. In extreme cases, people take rescue injections of glucagon, a hormone that raises blood sugar, but this is a difficult procedure and even more difficult for those that are unaware of hypoglycemia or require caregiver’s help. Hypoglycemia, therefore, is often a vicious cycle that often lasts for hours to a full day of intense, yet variable, glucose levels, for blood sugar to be normalized.

Prevention, therefore, is much better than rescuing from hypoglycemia, but there is nothing to prevent hypoglycemia occurrence. That makes hypoglycemia prevention a major unmet need in T1D management.

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2019/06/05/proof-concept-hypoglyce...

Prescription costs for drugs to treat type 1 diabetes (T1D) can make up a large percentage of what you pay each year for healthcare. There are a few ways you can lower your prescription and insulin costs: through state and nonprofit programs; diabetes patient assistance programs offered by pharmaceutical companies; medication discount cards; and prescription alternatives such as biosimilar insulin.

https://www.jdrf.org/t1d-resources/living-with-t1d/insurance...

Your diabetes care team helps you manage your physical health. But you might be missing a key member: a professional who can help with your mental health, too. Studies have long shown that people with diabetes are at higher risk for clinical depression than people without the condition. Diabetes is also linked to eating disorders, including diabulimia (skipping or limiting insulin to lose weight) and, particularly among people with type 2, binge eating disorder and bulimia.

And then there’s the day-to-day emotions that come with managing a chronic illness: stress, guilt, fear, blame, anger—not to mention the mood swings that come with glucose fluctuations. In short: People with diabetes are dealing with extra emotional burdens.

Therapy can help, and the benefits don’t stop at your mental health. Studies have shown that people with diabetes who seek mental health treatment experience A1C improvements, too.

http://www.diabetesforecast.org/2019/04-jul-aug/making-menta...

On top of tracking your diet and blood sugar, regular exercise is a key part of managing your diabetes. And while any exercise is better than none, certain activities have specific benefits for people with diabetes.

https://healthguides.cnn.com/diabetes-video-center/?vid=illu...

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) can bring the fear of developing low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia, which can arise if someone takes too much insulin. Typically, one would take a simple carbohydrate—be it juice, candy or a glucose tablet—to bring the blood sugar back to normal range. Severe hypoglycemia means that another person—because the person with T1D has lost consciousness or may be having a seizure—has to administer treatment. This requires a glucagon injection, which raises blood sugar, but it first has to be mixed in a several-step process. That’s bad for the person with severe hypoglycemia, but there’s a new FDA-approved treatment that alters the game.

Yesterday, the FDA approved Baqsimi, the first non-injectable emergency treatment for severe episodes of hypoglycemia. This treatment is a powder and is administered into the nose, and is approved for individuals four years and older. Injectable glucagon has been approved in the United States for several decades, but this is the first non-injectable treatment.

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2019/07/25/fda-approves-first-low-...

JDRF today launched its first Center of Excellence, a new research and funding model aimed at accelerating leading type one diabetes (T1D) research. The new JDRF Northern California Center of Excellence will unite the work being done at Stanford University and the University of California, San Francisco, focusing on beta cell therapies and immune therapies.

Centers of Excellence are a new concept aiming to tap into and accelerate critical T1D research being done around the world. The new model gives researchers the stability that will enable longer-term projects, while also allowing the flexibility to be nimble as new science emerges.

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2019/09/04/jdrf-launches-first-cen...

Since its discovery nearly 100 years ago, insulin has been the only effective treatment for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Improvements in insulin delivery—from the first human insulin in the 1970s to the introduction of insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM)—have been beneficial, but an overwhelming majority of people with T1D—83% of youth and 79% of adults—still do not have their blood sugar well controlled. That gives rise to complications, including heart, kidney and eye disease, and makes the burden of T1D considerable.

But there are drugs that could, potentially, help diminish the risk of blood-sugar swings. One is called GLP-1, which works, amongst other mechanisms, by increasing insulin release from the pancreas. It is approved only for type 2 diabetes. Another is an SGLT inhibitor, which is responsible for glucose (re)absorption in the kidneys and intestine. Clinical trials with insulin—GLP-1 plus insulin or SGLT plus insulin—have shown improved blood-sugar control, but they do not get a majority of adults down to 7% or lower with HbA1c. So what if you combine the treatments: insulin + GLP-1 + SGLT?

https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2019/08/12/triple-therapy-t1d-jdrf...

If you feel overwhelmed by the everyday stress of managing your routine…

• Watch our YouTube video series on why T1D is so stressful and how you can build resilience

http://go.jdrf.org/kC0OT03107F01Y19a70j20I

• Check out Beyond Type 1’s resources on diabetes burnout

http://go.jdrf.org/I070kCa0T2FP3119070YI01

• Connect with the Online Diabetes Support Team to ask questions and get suggestions for further resources

http://go.jdrf.org/iQ7C03Y7FlT001001a91I02

If you are experiencing symptoms of depression…

• Request to be paired with a JDRF Outreach Volunteer who can help you build connections in your local area

http://go.jdrf.org/p0200C17RI090m3Y1T0Fa71

• Read about the relationship between depression and diabetes from Beyond Type 1

http://go.jdrf.org/Q07I0aY0Cn1T9037110S2F0

• Watch JDRF’s Facebook Live event on coping with diabetes distress

http://go.jdrf.org/I070oCa0T2FT3119070YI01

If you are struggling with your body image or an eating disorder…

• Get the facts on ‘diabulimia,’ an eating disorder that involves purging by insulin restriction, from JDRF Canada

http://go.jdrf.org/z09a11T0002Y3p77CFU1I00

• Connect with others who are going through similar experiences on TypeOneNation

http://go.jdrf.org/r20q0I171YVTa3C7F009010

• Find out how you can help friends or loved ones with T1D who are struggling with an eating disorder

http://go.jdrf.org/iW7C03Y7FrT001001a91I02

Remember, if you are struggling and need more than an online resource, you may want to try therapy. Use this resource to find a mental health provider that has experience working with people who have diabetes. There is no shame in struggling with the mental and emotional aspects of T1D. There is help out there for you.

http://go.jdrf.org/X1T0FXY03100I72a9017Cs0

Fuskie
Who has been getting some pretty good fasting blood glucose readings lately but strangely enough, that's come with his weight going up about 5lbs...


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So, I recced your post and I'm replying to thank you for your efforts on this board.

I am far more aware of the nuances of what I call *the diabeteses* ..... because we know there are multiple different forms....than I would've been without the insights I've gained here
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I'm glad the digests are helpful to you. They are just a taste of the information available to help those living with diabetes and those living with those living with diabetes.

Fuskie
Who would love it if other Fools on the board posted some of what they come across as well...

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Disclaimer: This post is non-professional and should not be construed as direct, individual or accurate advice
Disclosure: May own shares of some, many or all of the companies mentioned in this post (tinyurl.com/FuskieDisclosure)
Fool Code of Conduct: https://www.fool.com/legal/the-motley-fools-rules.aspx#Condu...
Call to Action: If you like this or any other post, Rec it. Better yet, reply to it. Even better, start your own thread. This is YOUR TMF Community!
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Well, I glommed onto this board many years ago. Not because I felt a personal need..... beyond being a dentist with patients with diabetes and wanting a bit of personal insight beyond what WebMD might offer.

Helped me out no end, and that's for sure
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Well, here's something I picked up from one of your links years ago pertaining to exercise and insulin resistance. Specifically, how long it lasts post exercise...... with practical implications for resulting hypoglycemia when folk have good glycemic control.

In the context of exercise science/training and post exercise refueling, the immediate 1-2 hour time window tends to be emphasised a lot. When I read that there's measurable response lasting 48 hours+, I dug around a bit and realised that I needed to give a heads up in my classes...... especially to the newbies who'd been recently diagnosed and, with the shock of getting a new diagnosis, were suddenly ultra vigilant with diet and/or meds along with leaping up off the couch determined to get a "good" workout (i.e. beat themselves up in my SPINNING or CSI classes)

I usually recommended that they measure their blood glucose at more frequent intervals than usual...... which no doubt plenty of folk ignored in the way they did my recommendations to control intensity. However, the fitness director at my gym received a call from the wife of one such class member who'd insisted he follow my advice and, lo, discovered that he was quite markedly hypoglycemic for the remainder of the day and with symptoms he'd put down to side effects of the medication (which they were in a way)

A nice touch...... she was so pleased, she put $20 on my bar tab account (gym had a very nice restaurant) and sent her husband to class with an iTunes gift card! Down to you;)
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Nice. I find often that physical trainers don't know more than the basics of diabetes, and want to make sure you've eaten something so that your blood sugar doesn't go too low on their watch. In other words, it's more about a liability concern for themselves than a health management concern for their clients. They depend on you knowing what you need to know about your disease. And you should. But so should they.

Fuskie
Who usually likes to exercise with a low carb powerade or Propel water which has a few carbs to stimulate insulin production, though he doesn't actually know if that works...

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Disclaimer: This post is non-professional and should not be construed as direct, individual or accurate advice
Disclosure: May own shares of some, many or all of the companies mentioned in this post (tinyurl.com/FuskieDisclosure)
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Call to Action: If you like this or any other post, Rec it. Better yet, reply to it. Even better, start your own thread. This is YOUR TMF Community!
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They depend upon you knowing about your disease

Not I. From experience as a dentist (married to a physician), fitness instructor and participant/lurker on various TMF boards, I'm confident in assuming just the opposite for the most part.

This newly diagnosed T2D class member would be a perfect example. A regular (regularly once every 3-4 weeks) who put in minimal effort in class who only volunteered his health status when I commented that, after a few weeks of seeing him every class, it looked like a transition from one night stands to a committed relationship. Even then, he didn't want to listen as he "wasn't going to push himself"...... which he never did, BTW..... not realising than a low end effort once in a Blue Moon yields a different metabolic challenge than a similar effort multiple times a week, along with getting fitter.

Only reason the outcome was as favourable as it was..... I got nattering with his wife after a class he didn't attend and got to explain the principles of consistency in training and how you end up working harder in absolute terms (i.e. expending more energy) for the same perceived exertion as you get fitter.
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