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I am new to this board. I just found out today that I have gestational diabetes and I am depressed. I am 26 weeks pregnant and already trying to deal with depression and panic attacks. I have had so much blood withdrawn in the last week that I feel like my arms are going to fall off. Now, I have to do this at least once a day.

This runs in my family so my chances of having diabetes post pregnancy is increased.

:sighs:
-C

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Welcome to the board.The Holidays are no time to be depressed. My birthday was the sixth so believe me when I say I know all about depression.(read interview if you want). When I get like this, I remember how I thought other things in my life really sucked at the time but I kept on keeping on. Now I look back and those mountains look like mole hills.I hope you feel better...give it time.

again welcome J.P.
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Julie welcome to the board. We are a family of Fools who either have diabetes, live with people who have diabetes, or have some kind of sick fascination that leads us to hang out with people who either have or live with diabetes.

Seriously, this is a place for you to talk, ask questions, seek and receive support. I have a fear of needles and yet I have been pricing myself daily for 3 years now. I never thought could change my diet, but lost 30 pounds in 3 months.

Now I can not claim to know what it is like to be pregnant, so the whole gestational thing is out of my ballpark but feel free to open up, vent, seek reassurance, and anything else that comes to mind. You are among friends here.

Fuskie
Who really needs to get back on the treadmill...
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Thanks for the support. I met with a nurse who specializes in diabetes and a nutritionist today. I have to take blood 4 times a day!. Thank gosh it will only be for 3 months then I get a 6 week break. I am learning about carbohydrates and everything. I have to be tested almost yearly for the rest of my life for type 2 diabetes. I think once I lose weight and keep on this eating plan, I can avoid this from becoming a life long thing.

I am not starting to feel so overwhelmed by this anymore. When we did a sample test today, my blood sugar was 80. The nurse was impressed. I am wondering if my original tests were influenced by my panic disorder and anxiety because stress raises those levels. I wonder..

-C
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I am not starting to feel so overwhelmed by this anymore. When we did a sample test today, my blood sugar was 80. The nurse was impressed. I am wondering if my original tests were influenced by my panic disorder and anxiety because stress raises those levels. I wonder..

One of the mysteries about Diabetes is that there seems to be varying measures of it. Some people have wildly fluctuating sugar levels, others stay high and some have the danger of always being too low. The resulting damage to the body is near universal, however, so special attention must be paid to your feet, eyes and kidneys.

I will caution against one thing you said. This is a life long thing, but it does not have to overshadow a long life. You may end up taking blood tests daily or weekly until you see child off in holy matrimony. The older you get, the bigger the risk and consequences. But if you set out with the right mindset now, it becomes automatic. Eating right can become second nature, pricking your finger becomes a 30 second step in your morning routine.

When you realize that not only is your life at stake but your role as a mother, what you can do will amaze you!

Fuskie
Who does not actually know anything about motherhood, but has been called a mother****** once or twice...
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C - Congratulations on your impending event. Focus on that!!! It is definitely all worth while.

I've been a diabetic since I was 12. I had serious doubts that I had what it takes to be a healthy diabetic and have a healthy child. God showed me that I could do it with His help. My wonderful daughter is 7.5 yrs old (that half is important to her). I tested my blood sugar 4 to 6 times a day for a year prior to trying to conceive her, 8 to 10 times a day during pregnancy, and continue to test 4 to 6 times a day so that I will be here to enjoy my grandchildren. And I think I had an easier time of it than you do. I at least got to practice the diabetic part before doing the pregnancy and diabetic parts together. You'll do fine!

'Education' and 'focus' are your friends. Keep working closely with your diabetes nurse educator and nutritionist. Focus on the task at hand - keeping your BG (blood glucose) normal prior to delivery. By the time your child is ready for more than breast milk and formula, you'll already be an expert at reading the nutritional label on everything. You can do it and you can feel really good about the positive changes you're making in the process.

Congrats as well on the NORMAL BG! A word of caution, however, don't over-analyze BG test results, looking for a specific reason (or even a general one) for why a reading is what it is. I definitely go high when stressed. For a long time I tried to reason out every reading that was outside of my target range. I couldn't do it and it stressed me out - which lead to another reading outside of normal. Follow the guidelines given to you by your healthcare team to the best of your ability and as completely as possible. Let the test results be trend indicators, not single pass/fail grades.

Well, I think I've begun to ramble (it's late!!!) so I'll end this here. Would you mind if I prayed for God to give you the peace necessary to do what needs doing? It has certainly helped me. If you just need to talk to someone who knows a little about diabetes and pregnancy, please feel free to e-mail me directly so we can chat.

- Holly
A verse on peace that came to mind as I wrote this - John 14:27
http://bibletools.org/index.cfm/fa/Bible.show/sVerseID/26696/eVerseID/26696


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Congrats as well on the NORMAL BG! A word of caution, however, don't over-analyze BG test results, looking for a specific reason (or even a general one) for why a reading is what it is. I definitely go high when stressed. For a long time I tried to reason out every reading that was outside of my target range. I couldn't do it and it stressed me out - which lead to another reading outside of normal. Follow the guidelines given to you by your healthcare team to the best of your ability and as completely as possible. Let the test results be trend indicators, not single pass/fail grades.

Let me reemphasise this: Unless you are BG testing to time insulin injections, the daily pricks are intended to help you learn hour sugar patterns, and to monitor your trends. You establish a baseline so that you can understand how your body reacts to events, like getting up, eating different kinds of foods, etc.

Then you look out for variances from that norm that may indicate a change in your condition. A single event should not be a worry but continual readings outside of what you expect should be a warning sign to schedule a visit to the doctor.

I was worried about going on my annual Spring Training Trek at Disney World (Braves baseball by day, Pleasure Island by night) since I thought it would be hard to eat carb healthy down there (60g per meal). His advice was to go, enjoy the trip, eat reasonably but well. So I did. It did not hurt that the 10 miles I walked through the theme parks each of 9 days was more exercise than I had gotten in months!

Fuskie
Who will miss his 11th annual Spring Training Trek this year due to a lack of income...
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I will caution against one thing you said. This is a life long thing, but it does not have to overshadow a long life... The older you get, the bigger the risk and consequences. But if you set out with the right mindset now, it becomes automatic. Eating right can become second nature, pricking your finger becomes a 30 second step in your morning routine.

Well said.

Those words should be printed up and given out to everyone with this ailment, whether serious or mild.
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Thanks for all of the support. Fuskie, great point about the monitoring and baseline which was not told to me at all yesterday. I will definitely keep this in mind.

I am upset with my husband at the moment. He is not taking this seriously. He is telling me to monitor as told for awhile then do 1/2 as much. I find this ironic since his mother is diabetic and does nothing to monitor her well being at all. I have been totally supportive of his cholesterol issue. I always ask to make sure he takes his approperiate medication (weight loss and fish oil as his cholesterol is dropping without the statins). He is also telling me that I don't have to watch my carbohydrates after the baby is born which is totally wrong because if I don't have it afterwards, it still can pop up at any time.

I am very aware of label reading from the cholesterol standpoint (mine was 172 total, 131 LDL and 25 HDL last January). I make sure to watch saturated and mono fats. I was so surprised to find out that ramen noodles has 9 mg of saturated fats!. Now, I just have to add one more requirement, carbohydrates. The only thing I don't like about this diet change is no more OJ. I LOVE OJ!. Do any of you drink it?.

-C
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I awoke this morning with a BG of 51, drank 6 oz. of OJ. Thirty minutes later my BG was 117. Only drink OJ when you must, and you must only when there is a problem.

WC
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Those words should be printed up and given out to everyone with this ailment, whether serious or mild.

Thanks. I was going to say pricking your finger becomes as normal as picking your nose, but saw visions of coal...

Fuskie
Who is thinking of Sweat and Sour Pork for Christmas Eve...
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The only thing I don't like about this diet change is no more OJ. I LOVE OJ!. Do any of you drink it?.

Try V8 Splash! (Light). It is about 6g a bottle for a citrus juice blend.

Fuskie
Who reminds you there is always sugar free Tang....
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C - Ask your nutritionist about 2 oz OJ mixed with 6-8 oz of seltzer or club soda - make it an OJ spritzer! Keep up with counting the carbs even after the baby is born. Being truly aware of what you put in your mouth can do you nothing but good. Think creatively and you can do anything! - Holly
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My beverage of choice (when i'm not in a water mood):

Squeeze a half a lemon into a tall [12-16 oz] glass of water. Put the lemon rind in, and mash with a spoon to release zest & pulp. Add artificial sweetener to taste.

It ain't OJ, but it might be worth a try.


On a more hopeful note: My diabetes seems to be controllable by losing weight. While my weight is stable below 200 or [better still] declining, even an occasional carb bomb doesn't jack the morning reading above 110. Carb bombs seem nearly unavoidable in the holidaze season -- though an out-of-control reading or two might change my mind about avoiding them. The price i must pay: Watching total calories more carefully & increasing total exercise to burn off the calorie slip.

Another hopeful note: After 3 months of watching my diet, my pig-out habits are beginning to change, and my body is becoming more satisfied with a sensible amount of food.


Enjoy the holidaze, enjoy the new child, enjoy the return of the Sun to the Northern Hemisphere. The world isn't scheduled to end until at least 2012 ;>}

cassandra

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