Skip to main content
No. of Recommendations: 1
Just curious if there are any DRIPpers out there who have enrolled in a DRIP plan only to regret having done so within a year of enrollment...?

I was just wondering since it is so easy (and inexpensive) for people to start up a plan that the "impulse" shopping bug might affect some and before you know it, are stuck in a plan that they don't really want. (And have to pay out $10-15 + .10 cents per share to get out of the plan).

Just curious to find out what made you buy in the first place and what factors led you to realize that what you got isn't what you expected...

Keith...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 14
No real DRIP regrets so far, but I am annoyed that Tyco (TYC) decided to cancel their DRIP program a week after I enrolled in it.

Tyco was my top choice among conglomerate companies after months of research...at this point, I think I will keep an eye on 3M (MMM, my runner-up) as they undergo internal restructuring, but I will most likely forego having a conglomerate company and end up picking another pharmaceutical company for my portfolio instead.

myadidas
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
No real DRIP regrets so far, but I am annoyed that Tyco (TYC) decided to cancel their DRIP program a week after I enrolled in it.

Why limit your investment universe because they they do have an acceptable DRIP plan?

I consider Tyco when everyone was trashing it but I did not buy it (too bad). Maybe I was taken up with the bad press at the time thinking price will go down further.

With selecting investments, I could care less if they have a DRIP or not.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I was gonna say TYCO also for the same reason. But then again I can still drip or invest with them if I choose to. The problem is that they don't care about me so why should I care about them. Then again....I think this company is capable of giving me a LARGE boost in my investment. Which doesn't make my decision any easier.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I, too, bought into the DRP in Tyco. Laughed myself silly after I found they had closed their DRP program, and laughed even harder when I called the transfer agent to sell my ONE share!

Thought I was done laughing about my one-night stand with Tyco, but there's a sequel....

I had apparently sent money for an OCP and forgot about it when I called in the sell order. I now own 0.581 shares of Tyco X-)

Think I'll hang onto it until the company offers to buy it - just for the nuisance factor, the only revenge I will ever have on them for dropping their DRP!

Have a great week, all!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
Vulstock wrote: "Why limit your investment universe because they they do have an acceptable DRIP plan?"

Your point is well taken; however, you ARE on the Drip Investing Board....
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 14
No real DRIP regrets so far, but I am annoyed that Tyco (TYC) decided to cancel their DRIP program a week after I enrolled in it.

Why limit your investment universe because they they do have an acceptable DRIP plan?

I consider Tyco when everyone was trashing it but I did not buy it (too bad). Maybe I was taken up with the bad press at the time thinking price will go down further.

With selecting investments, I could care less if they have a DRIP or not.


I think eventually I will buy more stock in Tyco the regular way--for now, I don't have a broker though. All of the investments I have are either index funds through my 401K, Roth IRA or my drips.

Getting a broker will be the next step after I have finished selecting all of my DRIP companies, which should probably take a few more months. In the meantime, my three shares of TYC are still with the transfer agent--when the time comes, I'll have them moved to my brokerage account.

myadidas
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
DISNEY (DIS). I regret starting a drip for the following reasons:

1) High fees
2) once per year dividend
3) Small dividend
4) Management likes to return excess cash to themselves, not shareholders.
5) Slow purchases

Hope this helps someone,

Outtacash
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Approximately 5 years ago, I started a DRiP with Quaker Oats and had sent about 2 OCP's when they changed to a hih fee DRiP. This was my first lesson in brutal world of low finance. I kept my measely 5.4 shares in the account for quite a while making them send me the dividends via US mail. I know, that was petty but it did give me a small measure of satisfaction. I sold the shares through the plan and never looked back.

I feel lucky that this is my "horror" story and I still love to DRiP.

BH
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Enron.....enough said. :-(


Tammi
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
Wow,

Wish I could say my choices were always good ones. However, since I have been DRIPping for a long time, I have had a few bombs.

The worst was Ethyl Corp (EY). I started buying it at $13 and by the time I sold it, it was $3 - presently it is under $1 and they have long ago discontinued all their dividends.

At the original time of purchase, in the early 90's, the dividend was $.50 per share - quite good, don't you think? Well, they had some bad news and decided to cut the dividend in half. Still not too bad. But bad news kept coming (remember Enron?) and I decided to get out. I took some loss but learned a lesson - never chase dividends.

Others that were not the best were Wisconsin Energy (WEC) - originally a good utility but after the merger between Northern States Power didn't happen, the stock seemed to go downhill from there. When I sold it, I replaced it with Duke Energy (DUK) and I have never regretted that decision.

I bought Pacificorp, another utility, and shortly after, it was purchased by Scottish Power, an ADR. They cut the dividend drastically, and only pay it now and then.

Did I tell you about my “loser” small caps, that don't even pay dividends..........

Hopefully I have learned from my mistakes!!!!

Happy DRIPping.

Kathy
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
My current portfolio consists of 8 DRIP companies. Bob Evans Farms, Disney, ExxonMobile, Home Depot, Lucent, Pinnacle West, Wisconsin Energy, and Yahoo!. There are some of those I am proud I own and continually put money into. Others while I don't admit making a mistake I prefer to not invest anymore money at the current time. That's the best things about DRIPs. No matter what they are still assets.

Have you ever looked in your closet and asked yourself "Why the heck did I buy this?" Nothings wrong with it, might even be brand new but for whatever reason it just doesn't appeal to you.

Dave
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Now? Enron
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I'm too new to drips to regret any particular stock. But I do regret jumping in with both feet, buying single shares in so many stocks(8) at once. I wish I'd started with two or three and purchased at least 50 shares in each before even considering adding another stock.

I suppose that this time next year, I'll get bored and sell off a drip or two and reinvest what's left in something new or an old drip that is prospering.

My goal, however, is to find at least two or three that I'll be happy to keep for the next 20 years and longer.

Melissa
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Melissa...

But I do regret jumping in with both feet, buying single shares in so many stocks(8) at once. I wish I'd started with two or three and purchased at least 50 shares in each before even considering adding another stock.

Don't feel bad Melissa! We all have made mistakes. At least you had the intestinal fortitude to take a chance! Like one famous investor said: (can't remember who) "Not taking a risk - is the biggest risk of all")!

Eight companies all at once is, however, a bit much to handle. Everyone has their opinions so I might as well add mine. Why not get an Exchange Traded Fund (ETF) - one that follows the S&P 500 Index like (SPY). Additionally, I would then pare down my DRIP Holdings to my favorite two or three at the most. I personally (again, we all have our opinions) would select something like a (GE) which is a conglomorate that's been around for over a century. Kinda like a mutual fund all in one company. I also like either (JNJ) or (PFE) in the Healthcare Sector. Lots of Baby-Boomers getting ready to retire - we all need our meds. LOL! All three of those companies have DRIPs and pay dividends.

What I've selected here is a very safe, widely diversified portfolio that a beginning investor can handle. An Index fund and two Blue-Chippers! You can always add and change around later but at least you won't be losing your shirt while you are becoming much more adept at this game.

I didn't mean to ramble on, but it really pleases me to see young people taking advantage of one of the greatest money making tools there is in the greatest country in the world!!

Best of luck...

Bill

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 10
I'm too new to drips to regret any particular stock. But I do regret jumping in with both feet, buying single shares in so many stocks(8) at once. I wish I'd started with two or three and purchased at least 50 shares in each before even considering adding another stock.

I suppose that this time next year, I'll get bored and sell off a drip or two and reinvest what's left in something new or an old drip that is prospering.

My goal, however, is to find at least two or three that I'll be happy to keep for the next 20 years and longer.

Melissa
==========

This type of attitude can do far more damage than good to your long haul performance.

Being bored is NOT a reason to sell something.

It merely creates a taxable event and you get to cough up a % of your gains to Uncle Sam. If you have a loss Uncle will only forgive you to the tune of $3,000 per year, after that it is all your loss. The bigger your gains, the more Uncle gets, but only when you realize the gain by selling.

Unless you only get bored a time or two over the decades that will pass, I doubt you keep a stock the next twenty years or longer.

exilion
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Enron.....enough said. :-(

Tammi, sorry about your unfortunate experience with Enron. Although we do know why it is a bad investment now, I'm curious what factors led you to purchase Enron in the first place...?

Keith...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Exilion,
You're right "bored" was a bad word choice that I should have known better than to use. I should have used the word "digruntled."

Actually, for my long-term plans, boring stocks would be best. I'd like a stock that plugs along in an upward manner increasing my holdings with dividends. I'm not looking for the excitement of a roller coaster ride--didn't even like those as a kid.

Bill,
In January I'll be eligible to join my employer's 401(k), the first time in my life that I've ever had an opportunity to do so. If they have an index fund, I'll likely put the largest part of my investment in there.

Would you believe that I'd never heard of an index fund until I found TMF? Long story, but life's changes have forced me to seek out my own financial future. I'm truly looking forward to being in control of my own destiny ... even if I do make a few mistakes along the way.

Melissa
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Melissa...

I'm proud of your tenacity! You will do well!! Doesn't it feel good to take control of your own life/destiny? Keep at it and...

Best wishes,

Bill
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Actually, for my long-term plans, boring stocks would be best. I'd like a stock that plugs along in an upward manner increasing my holdings with dividends.


Maybe after some years you can change your name to "RichMelissa"
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
PM,

"I'm truly looking forward to being in control of my own destiny ... even if I do make a few mistakes along the way."

Making investing mistakes is a natural learning process. Making the same mistake twice is a bigger problem few of us can afford. As long as we have diversified portfolios and learn from our mistakes, in the long term we should be far better off than never starting in the first place.

I like to say - It's ok to watch from the sidelines the action on the dance floor, but it is costly to do so with stock markets. We learn to dance by getting out on the floor and stepping on a few toes at the beginning.

Geo Fisher
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Can anyone explain what Scottish Power is up to now?

With two college educations between us, one in English and one in engineering, my husband and I cannot cut through their legalese.

I never heard of a DEMERGER before; a spinoff, but not a DEMERGER.

I am planning to vote against it and then sell, take our losses, and go back to REITs, which generally treat me well.

Any legaleagles out there who bought this as we did as Kentucky Utilities, which was bought out by LG&E, then Scottish Power - contact me at iambuskins@webtv.net. I am a little old angry retired English teacher with nothing to do but clean house, read murder mysteries and fool with the net.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Can anyone explain what Scottish Power is up to now?

With two college educations between us, one in English and one in engineering, my husband and I cannot cut through their legalese.

I never heard of a DEMERGER before; a spinoff, but not a DEMERGER



I do not know about Scottish Power but I went through various demergers with HansonPLC. Each of the demerger, Hanson spin off each subsidary they had. One demerger they spun off 3 companies (I think). Every time they spin off these companies you had to refigure the cost basis. The company provides you these factors in figuring your cost basis.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Drip purchases I have regretted??? Only one, Nortel.

Print the post Back To Top