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The latest food item being hammered on TV is that eggs are bad for you. But they always show FRIED eggs! Is it because they are fried?

We like poached eggs, which we think are better.

Vermonter
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Eggs are high in cholesterol, so I can see where that would be an issue. I would also agree that frying them makes it even worse.
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What do you do with your poached eggs?

We love poached eggs, too. Fave is what I dubbed Eggs Benedict Arnold--for the missing hollandaise ;-)

Anyhow, it's a poached egg on a well-buttered English muffin half, toast, or even a crab cake, topped w/a squeeze of fresh lemon and s&p. Sometimes put some ham on the muffin/toast before the egg. But my fave versions use Ezekial sprouted grain English muffin half or rye toast. Rye bread is large, so the hubster & I split one slice. We had that for breakfast yesterday.

I also like a poached egg on my current version of huevos rancheros--seasoned black beans, poached egg, Rotel (canned diced tomatoes & chilies), poached egg, and a little shredded Mexican blend cheese.

I don't worry about eating eggs. I average maybe 3/week. I often go a month with no eggs whatsoever; other months with a couple of quiches or lots of poached eggs or omelets.

As a child and young adult, I was starving when I woke up in the morning. But I remember the first time I went out for brunch and couldn't finish a 3-egg omelet (in my mid to late 40s). In my 60s, t seldom want more than 1 egg, even as an onelet or (small) serving of quiche. If it weren't for the hubster, at nearly 70 I'd be content with just a cup of coffee many mornings, or a late brunch instead of lunch.
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alstroemeria:

We rarely do poached eggs at home; it's a bit involved. But she scrambles eggs(2 eggs each, as a rule, for a supper), usually, if we have them, with a piece of toast or something.

But this egg nonsense cycles, it seems. Good then bad. An egg is a good, total food. The body MAKES cholesterol -- not just absorbing the stuff from your food.

Awaiting snow today but we hope little. We want to go out with our daughter, son in law and teen age daughter to celebrate her birthday this evening.

Spring is due... muddy roads and all!

Vermonter
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Vermonter says But this egg nonsense cycles, it seems. Good then bad. An egg is a good, total food. The body MAKES cholesterol -- not just absorbing the stuff from your food.

I concur :-) There ARE issues with eggs? salmonella? I scrutinize eggs before I buy em. Any egg with cracks is left at the store. If I get home and find an egg that is cracked, I 'often' will just throw it away.

But, I do this with everything I eat anyway - so eggs are not unique in that aspect?

That said, I eat a dozen eggs per week. Scrambled, fried, boiled,...

eggs are bad, long live eggs?
ralph :-)
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We rarely do poached eggs at home; it's a bit involved.

Na. My mom had an egg poacher that fit over an ordinary skillet. It was a metal tray with I think four egg cups. You put water in the skilled and heated to boiling to steam the eggs in the egg cups.

Easy. Tasty. But not often used.

Google egg poacher for many examples: https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&ei=mZ6VXJjyJo2vj...
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I've never used an egg poacher. Just a skillet of simmering water into which I break an egg or 2, spoon some of the hot water over them, & a couple of minutes later remove w/a slotted spoon. Skillet easier to clean than when used for scrambled eggs.

Much of what I do in the kitchen is more involved--like cutting up cauliflower (messier & takes longer) or raw chicken (more unpleasant).
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For quick eggs, I use a microwave egg "poacher":

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00XLTYK3K

So easy. Just break the eggs into the four wells. Make sure the yolks are pierced. Then just 2 minutes @ 80% power.

HOWEVER, I would not say the eggs were "poached". I would call them hard-boiled eggs with a soft (not runny) yolk. I'll do an extra 10 to 15 seconds to make the yolks a bit harder. Cooking time can vary a little depending on the size of the eggs. Reducing the cooking time to get a runny yolk also leaves the white runny.

For me, the only drawback is that the shape is such that I can't make deviled eggs out of them. But they're great hot or cold, or chopped up in egg salad or chicken salad or on a Chef's Salad.
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We rarely do poached eggs at home; it's a bit involved

I beg to differ.

I cook poached eggs at home once or twice a week.

Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Add a little vinegar and some salt.

I crack two eggs partway and then use a fork to stir the water in the pot in a circle. I then finish breaking the eggs - one at a time - into the swirling water.

Turn down the heat to low and let the eggs cook for a few minutes, depending on how soft or hard you like your yolks.

Use a slotted spoon to remove each egg.

No trouble at all.

Christina
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