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Could use a pointer to an official source on whether the electric-car charger credit is still in effect for 2013.

I see mentions on web discussion groups of a "30% of cost" credit - but haven't found a more official source on that.

I'm wondering if I can count the cost for the wiring upgrades that will be needed to do it (I'll need to run new wire from my meter to my breaker panel, and I also need a new breaker panel in order to handle the additional 40A 220V circuits)

And I wonder if the credit gets phased out with income or anything

Thanks to anyone who can point me to the right documentation.
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I know nothing about the credit but learned of a new device that could save you some installation expense.

MotorWeek today did a feature on the charging infrastructure being developed in the US. They mentioned the need for a separate 40A 220V circuit but then reported on a new device that can eliminate that. It piggybacks onto an existing electric dryer or range circuit. The device uses that circuit to charge the car but senses demand from the dryer or range and returns power to them whenever needed. Assuming you charge the car mostly overnight this could work without inconvenience.
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Here you go: Federal & individual state info

http://www.pluginamerica.org/incentives
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Assuming you charge the car mostly overnight this could work without inconvenience.

I often run my washer or drier overnight (they shut off automatically when done). Not so much to save on electricity, but to save time: there is one of me in this house and I have 200 amp 240 volt electrical service. I can run my 50A electric stove and my 30A electric drier at the same time anyway. Mostly, I have my washer start at 5 or 6 AM and when I get up, I put the stuff in the drier. If I will need something in the morning, I wash in the late afternoon and put the stuff in the drier before going to bed. My power panel setup is pretty complicated already as I have a 12 KW natural gas fueled backup generator here and so in addition to the normal power panel is a box with a serious automatic power transfer relay and associated electronics, and another box that cuts off my electric stove and electric drier when the backup generator is in use. If I am careful, I can turn on the drier exclusive-OR the stove top but not the oven.

I do not have a plug-in car (2011 Toyota Prius). I live in New Jersey, so I would have no use for a Tesla.

Any idea how long it takes to charge a car like a Tesla when fully discharged to full charge from 240 volt supply?
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Any idea how long it takes to charge a car like a Tesla when fully discharged to full charge from 240 volt supply?

The Model S with the 300 mile range should take about 13 hours if you are using a 30-amp circuit. (85kwh/6.5kw)
Half that that time if you have a 60Amp circuit (and EVSE)

The Model S with the 230 mile range would be about 9.2 hours (60kwh/6.5kw)

Personally, I'm never going to have 230 miles in a day and be back home at night, much less 300. If I'm driving that far, I'm going on a trip. So empty-to-full charge time is not something I would be looking at. I would be looking at charge time for my typical commute/errands - and for a busy day running around to many places (shopping or running lots of errands)

I live in New Jersey, so I would have no use for a Tesla.
I don't think living in NJ is a reason not to use a Tesla. They don't turn off when you drive from Pennsylvania into NJ.
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I live in New Jersey, so I would have no use for a Tesla.
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I don't think living in NJ is a reason not to use a Tesla. They don't turn off when you drive from Pennsylvania into NJ.

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Actually, if you live in NJ and commute into NY a Tesla or other plug-in vehicle might be good for the commuting use. But to use for longer trips, where you'd want to do 300 miles/day, or more, a hybrid vehicle would be more practical.

Bill
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I live in New Jersey, so I would have no use for a Tesla.

I don't think living in NJ is a reason not to use a Tesla. They don't turn off when you drive from Pennsylvania into NJ.


I know the Tesla does not turn off when it enters the State of New Jersey. But There is a reason why New Jersey has the highest auto insurance premiums in the country: the lousy drivers. I notice that my Prius averages about 12 miles per hour when I drive most of my trips. And I get about 30 mpg in traffic, less in cold weather when the engine runs to make enough heat for the heater. Also, if I let it stop, another driver is likely to hit it. Only when on the highway, preferably in another state, can I get 55 to 56 miles per gallon. Since most of my trips seem to be about two miles, with two 50 mile (one way) trips per week, I spend most of my time waiting at traffic lights, with the engine running to keep me warm in cold weather. What does the Tesla use for a heater? Probably the precious battery.

Actually, the State of New Jersey is the worst state to have any car in. If they had better public transportation, I would get rid of it altogether. For longer trips I take the train (electrically powered around here, from the nuclear waste generation plant in Oyster Creek, an older version of the plants in Fukushima. Same GE design. Makes me feel real safe living only about 50 miles from there.).
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But There is a reason why New Jersey has the highest auto insurance premiums in the country: the lousy drivers.

I hate to disappoint you, but we, in NJ, don't even crack the top 10 for most expensive states. LA is highest at $2699. NJ is 12th at $1697. See http://www.insure.com/car-insurance/car-insurance-rates.html... for details.

Ira
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But There is a reason why New Jersey has the highest auto insurance premiums in the country: the lousy drivers.

I hate to disappoint you, but we, in NJ, don't even crack the top 10 for most expensive states. LA is highest at $2699. NJ is 12th at $1697. See http://www.insure.com/car-insurance/car-insurance-rates.html...... for details.


Do you mean that the politicians have lied to me? Incredible. ;-)
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Finally found a good source - it is form 8911.

From what I can tell it doesn't apply for AMT, so if close to hitting AMT, that limits the credit.
But no direct income limits on it.

I don't see any details about what should/shouldn't be considered part of the cost. So I think the needed wiring upgrades would be OK to include. Which would be nice, since they need to happen for other reasons. (I need to get rid of that federal pacific panel, since it's a fire hazard)
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