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Topic stolen from An Open Letter.

I *won't* do most requests until they are in writing, unless they come from someone in my department or my boss's boss.

It's a simple CYA manuever. I will not be asked "why did you do XYZ?" without being able to say "because ABC requested it - see?".

For example, I at one time had the ability and responsibility to release invoices from hold at one point. I kept telling the powers that be, in writing, that this belonged with someone else, someone who had a clue what prices and billing practices are.

I also made sure that everyone who requested something be released do so in writing. After it was requested I release something questionable, I went to someone higher than me (in writing) to say I didn't think the invoice should be released as is. They told me (in writing) to release it, so I did, and confirmed via email.

Two days later, the fit hits the shan. "Why did you release this?! We lost money on it!"

"Because so and so requested it and so and so approved it."

"*(&(&%!"

"Yep - I think it's time you finally give this ability and responsibility to someone who knows what we should bill, don't you think?"

Next day, I get to hand it off.

If I hadn't had PROOF that I had tried to stop the billing AND had warned in the past that the process as is would lead to lost revenue, I probably would have been canned.

So I don't really care if it's not nice to sit 3 feet away and send an email - I want to keep my job, thankyouverymuch.

impolite
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It is just JM being obtuse again.

As PSU pointed out, no one is disagreeing with him that there is a role for direct verbal communication. But when things of value are at stake, it is simply proper accounting to create a record of who did what when on what authority.

It isn't like a two paragraph, six sentence email is going to run the world out of bandwidth.
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Fer instance.

Every monday morning, we have a manager's meeting where we discuss price changes of vehicles. "We've had this 2007 Impala for 45 days at 14,990, it is time for it to go. How much do we have to lower the price to make sure it is sold within fifteen days? Ok. J will print a new price label, in the meanwhile G will use a grease pencil to mark it as a "manager's special" and D will change the price in the computer system and on the internet"

After I've made all the changes, I send an email to everyone who was in the meeting confirming the changes have taken place.
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"Yep - I think it's time you finally give this ability and responsibility to someone who knows what we should bill, don't you think?"

Next day, I get to hand it off.

If I hadn't had PROOF that I had tried to stop the billing AND had warned in the past that the process as is would lead to lost revenue, I probably would have been canned.


And somebody higher-up probably approved that transfer of authority as a form of reprimand...
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And somebody higher-up probably approved that transfer of authority as a form of reprimand...

SNORT

My guess is they suddenly realized the very nice girl in IT keeps meticulous records and will gladly bury their asses if they try to blame her for a trainwreck they caused.

I just *look* nice in person.

impolite
beyotch
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I also do most communications in email, and write a follow-up email after complex phone calls. It isn't so much for the CYA aspect (although that may come up) as because I find that written communications are far less prone to misunderstandings than conversations. I'd rather prevent the misunderstanding in the first place.
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