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Hi everyone,

A colleague of mine in Stock Advisor put up a link to this graphic on US energy use put out by Lawrence Livermore National Lab. https://flowcharts.llnl.gov/content/energy/energy_archive/en...

Look how little total use is from solar and wind! Less than 1%. Lots and lots of room for growth.


On another note, my mother-in-law told me that they're going to put a PV solar system onto their home and expect to drastically reduce their energy bills, both from generating it right there and from feeding any excess back into the grid for credit. A neighbor across the street, she tells me, has reduced bills that were about $200 per month to near $0 in the summer after installing a system last year.

Once it's installed, I'll have to ask her what inverter was included. :-)

Cheers,
Jim
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I'm sure that the cost is extreme, but I need to ask...How much does it cost to install this PV solar system?

Edyboom
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Or moreso, can you provide us with a link to the company that will install it? I assume that I can find info on their website. I don't intend on getting one as I don't even own a home. However, it would be nice to know for future reference. Thanks in advance.

Edyboom
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I'll have to ask her what company she ends up going with, but I'll try to remember and see if I can find a link (or at least find out what equipment they provide, i.e. maker of the PV panels, etc).

Cheers,
Jim
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In Tucson, AZ, the going rate is ~$5/watt, so a 1 kw PV system would be $5000. That is the full cost and doesn't include any tax credits/deductions, utility rebates, etc.

For a 4kw system, I believe the out-of-pocket cost after all is said and done is about $7000-$8000.

Dave
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Remember that solar hot water has a higher payback than PVs. A few companies are going to PVT designs - these cool the PV, raising efficiency, and the heat extracted goes to DHW or building heat. One new development, where applicable, is storing excess summer heat in the soil under a building. Much escapes, but it allow larger collectors to be economic, and it cuts heating bills, in late fall and early winter.

A variation some of us in the Dakota states are using is fans blowing summer air through the basement into the house, with dehumidifiers. The amount of heat return is low - but that cheap system is paid back through reduced summer cooling bills - very nice ROI. In our case, with a very old house, a nice byproduct is that we don't have trouble with frozen pipes anymore. Note that for the first few years, almost all the return will be in the form of reduced cooling bills - it takes time to warm all those tons of soil by this simple means.
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