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I'm putting in my notice around the middle of December. I'm not going to another job, or back to school or starting my own business. I'm quitting because I hate the job and have for almost 2 years now. I know my boss/co-workers will want a reason as to why when I tell them, but I can't seem to come up with a good BS explanation that doesn't have the word "hate" in it nor sound like BS. Advice?
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Just tell them that you want to pursue other opportunities (and then be mysterious and refuse to disclose any details).

You are wise not to be too forthcoming. Remember in most careers you will encounter your coworkers again and again. You may even need recommendations or leads to future jobs from some of them. So hold your cards close to your vest and don't reveal any more than necessary.

Of course by being mysterious, some will believe you are taking company secrets to a competitor. But bite your tongue and don't worry about it. Do expect to be grilled about it and even warned of your commitments to confidentiality.
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At this point there isn't anything to be gained by unloading your dissatisfaction on them about the job. Some people do that thinking it will improve the lot for those left behind or provide a catharsis. I think all it does is burn bridges and make you look like a problem to future employers (since stories get around).

I don't have any specific suggestions for you but you should try to make it sound positive. Some people are pushed out of jobs (seen as negative: fired or quit because they hate it) and others are pulled out (positive) as in cases where they go find new opportunities. It would be best if you left them with the impression that you are going to something good even if you have no specific plans to do so right now. That way of someone else asks "why did squirmyworm leave?" they can say "to pursue a certificate program" or "wanted to try a different industry". You're going to have to find something that makes it sound like you are being pulled towards something better than you have right now. Try "I have some interviews set up after the holidays" maybe.

You may have to work on a good story & practice it so it doesn't come across as a story. One note, saying "to spend more time with my family" is pretty much what every disgraced public figure (politician, fired CEO/coach) uses, and it sounds just as lame when ordinary people say it. Even when it's true. There's also a danger that a new employer may think (1) you have family problems that may disrupt work, (2) you impulsively leave jobs due to these problems, (3) you could do it again, and/or (4) it is just a cover story for something negative.

Good luck! I hope you find something new that you can enjoy -- too much of our lives are spent at work to put up with misery if we have the option to change it.
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Tell the truth. You've lost focus and cannot dedicate yourself to the job anymore. Rather than give less than your all to your soon-to-be former employer, you have decided to change your career direction to find something you can feel passionate about.

Fuskie
Who notes this approach gives the message that this decision is in the best interests of the company as well as yourself...
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Just say it's for personal reasons.
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I'm putting in my notice around the middle of December. I'm not going to another job, or back to school or starting my own business. I'm quitting because I hate the job and have for almost 2 years now. I know my boss/co-workers will want a reason as to why when I tell them, but I can't seem to come up with a good BS explanation that doesn't have the word "hate" in it nor sound like BS. Advice?

Advice for the question you asked: don't give a reason. Just resign. If pressed, tell them it's for personal reasons. Do not give further details. Be prepared to be walked out when you give this resignation, and expect a legal exit interview if you have any confidential information.

Advice for the question you should have asked: this is a bad idea, and you shouldn't do it. You probably already know this, though. Find your next job, and then quit the bad job because you have a better offer.

Regards,

- HCF
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Another cover can involve moving to another city. Then "personal reasons" is more readily accepted. People do it for family needs and relationships all the time.
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They aren't gonna torture you till you answer ;-) In your shoes I might say personal reasons or time for a change. But if you have enough $$ to live on for a year (preferably more), you could say you're retiring. Doesn't matter if you're 59, or 48, or 37. If you can support yourself (or your spouse can-) for a while, you can declare yourself retired. Later if you go back to work elsewhere, you can say you missed working or a great opportunity came along or they made you an offer you couldn;t refuse or whatever.

Just remember that it isn't as easy to find work as it once was, especially for those who are unemployed.
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I'm hesitant to say "personal reasons" because I hate everything about my job, including my coworkers. I don't want them to think they've run me out of the company. I may say I'm moving because I have thought about moving, but that's probably six months away.


Advice for the question you should have asked: this is a bad idea, and you shouldn't do it. You probably already know this, though. Find your next job, and then quit the bad job because you have a better offer.

I'm going to need a minimum of two months to clear my head after I quit and I don't know of any employer who'd be willing to wait that long for me to start. After the day I had today I don't even care if I ever get another job. I'm thinking about moving up my resignation date. Screw what some imaginary employer in the future's gonna think. My first priority is to preserve my mental and physical health.

P.S. I am so over coworkers.
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I'm hesitant to say "personal reasons" because I hate everything about my job, including my coworkers. I don't want them to think they've run me out of the company. I may say I'm moving because I have thought about moving, but that's probably six months away.

I'm going to be a bit blunt here: You may hate to use the term "personal reasons", but if you hate your current job so much that you are willing to just walk away with no other prospects on the horizon, your issues are most assuredly "personal".

I'm going to need a minimum of two months to clear my head after I quit and I don't know of any employer who'd be willing to wait that long for me to start. After the day I had today I don't even care if I ever get another job. I'm thinking about moving up my resignation date. Screw what some imaginary employer in the future's gonna think. My first priority is to preserve my mental and physical health.

P.S. I am so over coworkers.


Bad coworkers can suck. However, if you feel that way about all of them, then the problem could be staring you in the mirror.

Jobs come and jobs go, but it is always easier to get a job while you are currently employed than it is to quit and then look for a job. I do wish you luck in figuring out what to do with your life.

LWW
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Bad coworkers can suck. However, if you feel that way about all of them, then the problem could be staring you in the mirror.

I didn't get into specifics because maybe it's a bit beyond the scope of this board. I don't hate them all. One coworker is quite pleasant and my direct supervisor is tolerable. The others spew borderline racist, bigoted, hate-filled comments on an almost daily basis. (e.g. "The only reason people become Muslims is because they hate America.") I'm not a direct target of these comments, but I don't feel they are appropriate in the workplace. Our dept. head does nothing because she dislikes confrontation, plus she mostly agrees with their views. It's a very cliquish environment. Oh, and it's a family-owned company and one of the family members is in our department and he's often an instigator of the discussions that lead to the hate-spewing.

I keep my mouth shut, head down, and ipod volume cranked to the max. I leave the room when I feel I can't hold my tongue any longer. But I shouldn't have to. If I actually enjoyed my work, liked the company, liked the products we sell I probably would say something. But even without the sucky coworkers I'd be there maybe another year, at most. It's not worth it.

Jobs come and jobs go, but it is always easier to get a job while you are currently employed than it is to quit and then look for a job. I do wish you luck in figuring out what to do with your life.

LWW


Thank you for your well-wishes and I genuinely appreciate your concern. I was laid off a few years ago and was unemployed for a year before I landed my current job (which I had to move several hundred miles for). Quitting is a risk, but that's what LBYM and emergency funds are for, right?
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If I actually enjoyed my work, liked the company, liked the products we sell

I'm gonna go waaaaay out on a limb here, but I would describe my company's products as stuff we make, not stuff we sell. So are you in sales? In my experience (limited to my career in software and early pink-collar jobs), people in sales tend to be more politically conservative and more, er, forthcoming about personal opinions about non-work matters than people who design & build products--or care for patients & customers.

I once moved to a neighborhood that turned out to be filled with salesmen and their mostly SAHM wives. I, too, did not know what to say in response to blowhardish comments about our fellow Americans--listening to women who didn't need to work or men who got bonuses bigger than their salaries complain about teachers and the working poor made me grind my teeth! But I rarely heard stuff like that in the workplace. Maybe you're in the wrong field?

Also in my limited experience, very small family-run companies tend to be…odd and insular, their ambience determined almost solely by the personality of the president. I was happiest at a mid-sized but youngish company rather than small and family run (a lot of homogenity and social pressure, also my most conservative work environment) or large (bureaucratic). But one advantage of large companies--the one I worked for anyhow--is that if you don't like your current work or workgroup, that is likely to change before too long. Again, software. More traditional organizations are presumably more static. I'm also happiest in an environment where I can be creative and work alone most of the time. Maybe you need to figure out what kind of workplace you are most comfortable in, and then go out and find one.

=alstro, laughing at my own rather blowhardish post ;-)

PS--Short of quitting,..might it be possible to reduce your work hours to, say 3 days a week or half-days or something? COuld you say it's for family reasons? Then use this time to do things like take a Myers-Briggs personality test or even get professional help finding your ideal work and work environment.
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Oh, and it's a family-owned company and one of the family members is in our department and he's often an instigator of the discussions that lead to the hate-spewing.

OMG! Been there, done that, burned the freakin' t-shirt. The private company I worked for went bankrupt about a year after I left.

If you have the funds to get out, it does sound like that might be your best bet, although I still stand by the idea that it's easier to move from one job to another, rather than have to look for one when you don't have one.

If you think it's awkward trying to explain why you are leaving to your boss, then try explaining why you left without another job to your potential employer. Start looking for opportunities. Do you have any vacation time or personal time that you can take?

LWW
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I keep my mouth shut, head down, and ipod volume cranked to the max. I leave the room when I feel I can't hold my tongue any longer. But I shouldn't have to. If I actually enjoyed my work, liked the company, liked the products we sell I probably would say something. But even without the sucky coworkers I'd be there maybe another year, at most. It's not worth it.



My husband quit his job two years ago because he was on the verge of a breakdown, or at least that's the way he put it to me. He was 65 1/2 years old putting in 12 hour days in a very stressful environment. He was in financial services in Manhattan. He was on call all the time if a problem arose.
Before he quit he made sure that he could afford to walk away from a six figure salary. He did the math over and over and over again and he quit six months before his social security kicked in. We are fine.
We downsized and moved and now live in a very beautiful small New England town where everything seems to be less expensive than it was in NY.
I do recall that my husband quit a job early on in our marriage. I was expecting and wondered how he could just quit his job. In those days you could quit a job in financial services and walk across the street and get another one next day. That is no longer the case in NY City.
Good luck in whatever you decide to do but don't let what's going on in your workplace run you out of your job before you are ready to leave.
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Good luck in whatever you decide to do but don't let what's going on in your workplace run you out of your job before you are ready to leave.

~~~

There are, without doubt in my mind, conditions that may warrant an instantaneous departure from employment.

Just this year one of my co-workers was running circles around the members of the team he transferred to. In order to keep themselves looking like inept fools, management began giving conflicting orders and irrational deadline commitments. He was working through the weekends trying to satisfy all the demands. Eventually, he was accused of being threatening when he was snapping at his co-workers. HR took managements side. They accused him of taking high value assets from the building when in actuality he was locking them up in the lab per security protocol. He refused to sign documents pleading guilty to their accusations and quit.

Sometimes it is better to walk away before you can be framed and have a fabricated paper trail that will follow you around in your future endeavors. BTW, this is a well respected Fortune 500 company.

My cousin worked a legal case for a man who quit his job at a trucking company with no notice due to poor working conditions. As the employee was walking out the door, the manager went after the employee with a baseball bat and fractured his skull along with other severe damage. Having legal such recourse against a bad work environment is kind of pointless when you are living in a hospital bed eating from a straw for several years.

justacog
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There are, without doubt in my mind, conditions that may warrant an instantaneous departure from employment.



Absolutely! I myself had to quit a good job because my boss was a bully and almost no one could work for her. I was lucky because my husband was the major breadwinner and I didn't have to worry about quitting a job. In fact, several months later I got a job as a temp at the same company with a higher pay rate working for the best team of people I ever met.
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Here are some things that I think one could say that wouldn't burn bridges, but also would make the person seem unstable either.

"For awhile I've been unsatisfied in a number of life areas, including my job. It's not just my tasks - I'm trying to determine whether I want to stay in this area of the country or move. I feel I need some time to reflect on where I want to live, and whether I want to stay in this career path or make a major career switch and resigning will give me the option to take extended trips to areas of the country I'm considering relocating to."
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using positive words is a plus.

I'm looking to understand my priorities and expand my interests, perhaps to other areas or other fields. I appreciate the opportunity to reflect and consider my carear path and explore other areas in which to live. I also appreciate my current company for making such a change possible.

That last sentence is kind of like my appreciating my ex-wife making it possible for me to marry my current and favorite wife.

Jack
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