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From today's N'Orleans paper.

Finding ammo? Shortage result of 'perfect storm', not likely to end this year

BY JOE MACALUSO | Contributing writer May 1, 2021 - 3:00 pm

Been to a local gun shop lately?

How about one of those big-box outdoors stores?

Seen the empty shelves that, once upon a time, were well-stocked with ammunition to suit all hunters and year-round shooters?

Empty! And it’s not going to get much better, at least not any time soon.

That’s what Lee Benoit, the manager . . .


See https://www.theadvocate.com/acadiana/sports/article_c0c4634e... for article.
;-(

C.J.V. - still gots lots of primers, bullets, cases & powder for reloading, me

Now if the rain stops;
https://honeyisland.org/ so I can burn up me excess stock . . .
;-)
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Ammo prices have come down 60%-70% from the highs. Still prices are well above the normof calmer days.
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Remington pre last bankruptcy was only producing limited amounts of ammo because suppliers wisely were worried about being paid. The plant is under new stronger ownership and is rapidly gearing up to full production so supply will be increased. They have surprisingly large plant in Arkansas

The big arms making companies have some surprises
"The companies holding the largest market share in the Guns & Ammunition Manufacturing in the US industry include General Dynamics Corporation, BAE Systems PLC, Northrop Grumman Corporation and Vista Outdoor Inc." I assume much of this is military - one 155 mm artillery shell would would equal lots of 22 LR in cost and materials used.

380 ammo in particular seems too have nearly vanished but in general ammo is getting more available . But still only at inflated prices.
During periods of increased demand manufacturers have the luxury of shifting production to the most profitable highest selling calibers. Ones where they can extract extra profits. Thus the shortage of 22 LR which is mostly generic in nature

Ammo is suited for hoarding, if stored properly it can last for 50 years or more. Reloading components might be good for even longer
https://www.activeresponsetraining.net/old-ammo-will-it-stil...
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Ammo is suited for hoarding, if stored properly it can last for 50 years or more. Reloading components might be good for even longer
https://www.activeresponsetraining.net/old-ammo-will-it-stil......


FWIW, I still have 3 boxes of Winchester match pistol .22 long rifle ammo from a brick that I bought in late 1967 and a couple boxes of Federal long rifle that went up and down the ALCAN Highway in the late 60s/early 70s 5 or 4 times. I want to take them out to the range and fire them using a chronograph to see if they had deteriorated over time. It would have to be a perfect sunny day with little or no wind and few other shooters, probably on a Friday afternoon.
;-)

I would also caution y’all about storing reloaded pistol ammo for long periods of time. I found that .44 reloads that are older than about 15 or 12 years tend to split the cases when fired. It isn’t a major problem with a revolver but in a semi-auto pistol it can cause damage to both the pistol and/or shooter. I try to shoot up my 9mm and .45 auto reloads before they are 8 or 9 years old. I recently fired 50 rounds of 25-06 cartridges that I had loaded about 30 years ago using cases that I had resized from once fired 30-06 cases. About 60 percent of the fired cases had cracked necks - not a great danger but I dumped the rest of the fired cases and removed the bullets from some old .44 ammo and will dump the cases & burn the powder.

C.J.V. - still have some primers from the late 60s that I’ll have to dispose of, me
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"Ammo is suited for hoarding, if stored properly it can last for 50 years or more. Reloading components might be good for even longer"

I posted this a long while back. About 20 years ago, we were house hunting in anticipation of a job move to another state. We looked at an older ranch house, owned by a very old guy who could clearly not manage it any more. It needed some work, as they say. The house had a very big garage; It had enough room for 2 very large cars/pickups and lots of additional storage. I kid you not, we went in there and both sides where the cars would fit, were filled from floor to ceiling with unopened shotgun shell boxes. I'm only guessing that there were hundreds of the boxes neatly stacked in there.

I was thinking to myself as we walked through that if, God forbid, there was a fire, that house would have been blown up to kingdom come. I momentarily considered making the fire dept aware as a safety measure, but didn't want to have a family member come after me for reporting the guy. We didn't buy the house.
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I was thinking to myself as we walked through that if, God forbid, there was a fire, that house would have been blown up to kingdom come. I momentarily considered making the fire dept aware as a safety measure, but didn't want to have a family member come after me for reporting the guy. We didn't buy the house.

This is a lack of knowledge. Ammo stored in the boxes they came in does not go BOOM when there is a fire. Ammo stored in a sealed metal ammo can could potentially burst due to pressure build up. Only a gun with a round in the chamber could be dangerous. A gun with a loaded magazine is not a problem in a fire either, it's only a gun with a round in the chamber ready to fire.

Not a problem storing ammo, however it seems like it would be..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SlOXowwC4c

Watch at 12:25
Go to 14:35 to hear the firefighter talking about standing in his gear while the burn took place.

Watch 17:40 onward where they simulated a retail ammo store with 115,000 round of ammo.
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So that's really interesting. Not what I expected. (I like some of the comments saying people were "crying" watching the ammo literally going up in smoke). But why do fireworks explode with more force than bullets?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFzA6s4Hahw&ab_channel=T...
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People generally expect what they see in movies - fantasy land, not reality.

If ammo was unstable how could you expect people to carry it around, that would be dangerous.
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People generally expect what they see in movies - fantasy land, not reality.

That is what was so great about the show "Mythbusters". They often showed what they did to get the movie effects which were 99.99% unlike reality.

JLC
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fireworks use black powder which explodes when ignored ."Smokeless" powder used in modern weapons is not an explosive. It just burns when you ignite it. It does burn very hot but not that fast. The chemistry of the two are quite different.
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That is what was so great about the show "Mythbusters". They often showed what they did to get the movie effects which were 99.99% unlike reality.

That was a fun show to watch, and factual to boot.
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fireworks use black powder which explodes when ignored - mauser

-----------------

Are there any guidelines for how often you should give your black powder some attention so it doesn't feel neglected and explodes?
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black powder storage
dark anti static containers probably plastic
Whatever, avoid sparks. Common sense.
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black powder storage
dark anti static containers probably plastic
Whatever, avoid sparks. Common sense.


FWIW, until recently GOEX black powder was sold in 1-pound steel cans, unlike most smokeless powders. I haven’t bought any in the last 4 or 3 years but I noticed from their web site that it is now pictured in 1-pound plastic containers (See https://goexpowder.com/products/black-powder/ ). About 12 or 10 years ago, I was at Dixie Gun Works and asked about kegs of black powder. I was told that it came in 25-pound plastic containers for something like $250 or $225/Keg. Back in 1968, a keg of FF powder cost $27.00 and was packed in a steel container. Since it was fairly hard to locate at that time, I bought one for use in my muzzle loading firearms.
;-)

C.J.V. - still have 8 or 7 cans of GOEX powder in my workshop, me
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