No. of Recommendations: 0
Hey;

How do you all deal with being fired? I just lost a contract today, one that I've had for a little over a month. I've done exactly what the lady wanted, and then some. I feel I've provided good service, exactly what was promised when she hired me.

But still it's hard for me to feel OK being fired. Even though I feel I did nothing to deserve it. I'm just starting this business, only a few clients, well one less now.

Oh well. Life goes on.

Darrin
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
"Out of adversity comes opportunity."

Hey, it will give you time to hunt a better paying, and more stable clientele.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
I feel I've provided good service, exactly what was promised when she hired me.

Are you still on good terms? If so, ask her why she fired you. It may have nothing to do with you - maybe another expense came up and she can no longer afford your services, maybe another project took precedence and she can't devote the energy to the project you were working on, etc.

And if it was you, maybe you can find out what you did "wrong" and not do it again.

My focus is always, always, always to provide the best customer service I possibly can. If someone was unhappy, I'd want to know why and I'd want an opportunity to fix it. Might not get you your contract back, but at least you wouldn't be leaving a dissatisfied customer in your wake to badmouth your business.

SS
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
<<Hey;

How do you all deal with being fired? I just lost a contract today, one that I've had for a little over a month. I've done exactly what the lady wanted, and then some. I feel I've provided good service, exactly what was promised when she hired me.

But still it's hard for me to feel OK being fired. Even though I feel I did nothing to deserve it. I'm just starting this business, only a few clients, well one less now.

>>


I go on to the next call.



People don't need a reason to find another supplier. As long as you are satisfied with the service you offer and don't have too many repeats of this kind of choice I wouldn't worry about it.



Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I agree that you should make an honest assessment of why you were fired - even asking the client if possible.

If the client doesn't have a reasonable objection to your services, just remember the 95-5 rule and move on.


ShelbyBoy
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 6
<<How do you all deal with being fired? I just lost a contract today, one that I've had for a little over a month. I've done exactly what the lady wanted, and then some. I feel I've provided good service, exactly what was promised when she hired me.>>

Darrin....I've been selling my services to the fickle consumer for over 25 years now. Getting " fired" is part of the business of being in business, I'm afraid.

While it's a good idea to analyse where you maybe went wrong, don't assume that you actually did. You can't suit everyone all the time and the very reasons that make your product a valuable commodity to one customer may be the things that turn someone else off.

There are heaps of reasons why clients/customers/patients look elsewhere but, at the risk of appearing to be overly focussed on $$$, I find that the biggest reason that my patients look elsewhere is cost......as my office manager frequently tells casuals who baulk at what they perceive to be my high fees "We sometimes lose patients who are looking for a better price elsewhere, we've never lost a patient who got better quality"

If this is indeed the case and if you provide a worthwhile service that's appropriately priced, you may well find yourself getting re-hired in the not-too-distant future. It's not unusual for someone who's gone elsewhere looking for a good deal to return to me when they find out what the true "cost" of that good deal is. Such people end up as the best ambassadors you could possibly have for your business.

Above all, don't take it personally....otherwise you'll end up feeling resentful of the time you invested, be reluctant to get "burned" again and end up communicating this resentment to the next potential customer.

Vivienne
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
<<......as my office manager frequently tells casuals who baulk at what they perceive to be my high fees "We sometimes lose patients who are looking for a better price elsewhere, we've never lost a patient who got better quality"
>>


As you have often pointed out, your office manager is a peach.


<<If this is indeed the case and if you provide a worthwhile service that's appropriately priced, you may well find yourself getting re-hired in the not-too-distant future. It's not unusual for someone who's gone elsewhere looking for a good deal to return to me when they find out what the true "cost" of that good deal is. Such people end up as the best ambassadors you could possibly have for your business.
>>


As I've often discussed before, in my view the two most important qualities to look for in a service provider are 1) honesty and 2) competence, and honesty is more important than competence.

An honest person wont cheat you by charging you for something you don't need, will tell you if they aren't the right person to help you, and can be depended upon to charge you a reasonable price for their services. What more can you ask for?



Seattle Pioneer

Print the post Back To Top