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We all always keep our eyes open for bargain foods, right?

This week, Price Chopper (a local grocery chain) had its periodic bargain for fried chicken: 8 pieces for $4.99 vs the usual $8.99. We bought it hot and brought it home and reheated it in the oven. Meanwhile, my wife opened a fresh $1.49 (also on sale) package of cole slaw mix (shredded cabbage, carrots and such) and whipped up a fresh batch of slaw with mayo, vinegar, sugar and other herbs in her special recipe.

About $6.50 total.

We enjoyed a meal of some delicious fried chicken and cole slaw -- and have another equal-sized portion for another meal later in the week. $4.99 + $1.49 + some mayo and stuff cut in half means this meal cost us about $3.25. Not bad! And we didn't have to bread or fry the chicken, or shred the cole slaw stuff either.

Watch those ads!

Vermonter
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Good one, Vermonter. Nutritious and also low carb.
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Well, honestly, maybe not low carb, but tasty -- and, again, cheap!

Vermonter
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Main carb is likely to be breading on the chicken. Probably not a lot. Cabbage is low carb. Sugar is easy to replace with sucralose (or others).
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Sugar is easy to replace with sucralose (or others).

Is it? Is the flavor the same?

I’m really wondering as I didn’t think there was a very good substitute. Sure things like agave nectar and such maybe be a better choice, put you can’t dissolve it like sugar to create the same type of dressing or the correct consistency for many things.

Let me know please.

Aj
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Main carb is likely to be breading on the chicken. Probably not a lot.

Actually it's significant, unless it's very lightly breaded (dipped once in a light coating of flour, not a heavy coating of batter, and definitely not "extra crispy"!) AND all you eat is one small piece.

Cabbage is low carb. Sugar is easy to replace with sucralose (or others).

Doesn't taste the same, but not all that noticeable in a flavorful cole slaw unless you use a lot. I've learned to enjoy cole slaw with no sweetener (so I rarely buy it already made). And I use a little sweet onion instead of a regular onion. Sometimes I use a little fruit juice (like the juice from crushed pineapple canned in its own juice or a wee bit of orange juice, which I don't normally buy), especially for company.

In my house, cane sugar is relegated to the sugar bowl for guests to put in their coffee. We don't sweeten our coffee--except when I make iced coffee and then I use flavored liquid stevia...current fave is English Toffee.

Just as I adjusted to not sweetening my (hot) coffee, I've adjusted to not sweetening other things, or sweetening much less. Asian recipes calling for sugar get artificial sweetener (usually liquid stevia--I keep plain on hand as well). In a flavorful dish, the slightly bitter off-taste is not apparent. I also happen to appreciate bitterness in general--why I like strong coffee unsweetened.

ASIDE
Anyone who's been diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes, or whose blood sugar is rising & getting close, or who has weight to lose, should consider removing sugar from their diet, along with the other refined white carb (white flour), as well as unhealthy fats (eg, commercial fried chicken).

In my case, my fasting blood sugar in my 60s is in the 90s, but once it was 109 (and once in the 80s :-)...that drove me to low carb, as did my excess poundage. T2D is rampant on both sides of my family, even among some skinny, fit seniors.
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Is the flavor the same?

I'm a new diabetic and doing lots of exploring with low carbs.

My taste buds are not very sensitive. I'm a foodie and like everything.

I find aspartame suitable for many purposes. I prefer sucralose to stevia. But still use a little sugar sometimes.
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"Anyone who's been diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes, or whose blood sugar is rising & getting close, or who has weight to lose, should consider removing sugar from their diet, along with the other refined white carb (white flour), as well as unhealthy fats (eg, commercial fried chicken)."

Except that pure maple syrup -- the real stuff -- IS okay for diabetics. My wife has used it for years (along with careful dieting in other ways) to help her avoid diabetes without ever really succumbing to the illness.

Vermonter
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Except that pure maple syrup -- the real stuff -- IS okay for diabetics. My wife has used it for years (along with careful dieting in other ways) to help her avoid diabetes without ever really succumbing to the illness.

This should probably come with an "it depends" sticker warning on it. I love maple syrup and often choose it rather than other things when I am flavoring my chili. A pork tenderloin with a maple-bourbon glaze is a truly fantastic meal as well.

However, equal amounts of maple syrup and table sugar are likely to do similar things to one's body. And if someone is already compromised -- by existing health conditions, by an overall poor diet, or by being sedentary -- changing from sugar to maple syrup is probably not the best first incremental step to take.

(A better incremental step might be choosing to pay attention to how hungry you are right before you eat for two weeks and to make one trade per day of a processed food to an unprocessed food.)

ThyPeace, kind of a nerd about this.
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I agree. Sugar is a natural product that comes from plants. Maple syrup is merely another source of sugar. It is relatively unprocessed. But processing removes impurities. It does not affect its diabetic properties.

Hence, moderation is the key to use by diabetics. Not the source.
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