Skip to main content
No. of Recommendations: 0
Is it just me, or does it seem like food prices, overall, are still rising in the real world?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I don't know about food prices rising, since the weekly adds are pushing turkey and I don't remember what I paid past year.

However, I do see a big push for "value-added" protein, as in "tortilla-crusted Tilapia" at $2.99/ 4.2 oz filet.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Re: Turkeys - I paid 89 cents per pound last year at Aldi for a Butterball. This year, the same turkey at the same store, is 99 cents per pound. However, last year Kroger had its store brand turkey for 89 cents per pound - this year they, as of this week, are 69 cents per pound (with the store loyalty card).

Donna
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Food, grocery, health and beauty aids have what is called sticky inflation. Once the prices go up, they rarely, if ever come back down.

Also heard yesterday on the news that none of the airlines are going to drop their bag fees, bottle water fees, clean pillows fees, etc. etc.

Welcome to the new world order.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
We were lucky to get a note from our grocery store saying that they would be dropping prices back down. I still haven't seen chuck roasts or 90% beef back at $2/lb, though.

~w
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Interesting article on BNN yesterday.

Gist was that food packaging companies realize that customers have a resistance point on price so many have gone with ... uh thinner packaging. Cereal boxes are the same height and width but thinner depth wise. Since most people don't read the label, it works.

Skippy peanut butter put a large dimple in the bottom of the jar causing the customer to get 10% less peanut butter for the traditional price.

Tim
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Tell me about it. Looking through the store ads, I think "well that's a decent price," and then I look at the package size. The "sale" price for a small box of cheerios that's maybe four bowls worth, is what the "normal" price for a bigger box used to be. At that price I'll just eat oatmeal.

And don't get me started on cheese prices!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
I don't get it. Everyone seems worried about medical expense, yet they complain about the cost of eggs if they go over a buck a carton. (just using eggs as an example). Food is one of the most important things you can buy. It costs a lot more to produce decent food than most 1st Worlders seem to think they should pay. The nutritional value of a 99 cent egg is WAY below what a real egg has. Most of the stuff in the grocery store is pure junk. Most people in this world pay a much, much larger percentage of their income on food. We should too. Spend more money on real,local food that is not made in a factory. You will live longer and spend a lot less at the doctor.

Real egg = orange thick yolk chock full of Omega 3's just like salmon that chickens get from free range grazing.
Fake egg = pale, watery thing that is layed TWICE a day by a bird with no use of it's legs with a very short life fed anything that will make an egg.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
The nutritional value of a 99 cent egg is WAY below what a real egg has.

Geez, if I was paying .99 per egg, I'd already be bankrupt.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
One nice thing about Cali is that we get the food prices posted in $$/oz or pound. So it's easy(-ier) to compare.

D (refuses to pay more than $0.20/oz for cereal)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
One nice thing about Cali is that we get the food prices posted in $$/oz or pound. So it's easy(-ier) to compare.

We get that in Washington too, but please check the math. I've seen two competing brands, in precisely the same weight container, where the one that was more expensive per container was allegedly lower cost per ounce.

(I've also seen, in one product, one brand's unit price being labeled as per ounce, another brand's labeled as per pound, and a third labeled as per package - with the "unit" price-per-package not the same as the price of a package.)
Print the post Back To Top