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Footsox,

Our local churches have 'medical lending items' that are donated.

You might try to research your area.

When I had a hip replacement, the visiting nurse got me an extended tub bench.
It was a game changer when I finally could shower. I used it for many weeks.

Like this
https://www.amazon.com/Carex-Tub-Transfer-Bench-Convertible/...

I had an rollator, but your local places might have one for you to borrow.
I found that much better than the bare bones walkers the hospital provided, but it would be (of course) based on how comfortable you are with it.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000TVTLE6/ref=redir_mobile_deskto...

Best of luck
nag
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Probably a dumb question...

The only really dumb question is the one you should have asked that you did not.

I am getting ready to have hip surgery.

I was not in such a group, but if your group all had their surgeries on significantly different days, you might be able to share stuff and only buy one set of (most of) the stuff.

I have been part of a group who have also had hip surgery. They all buy various things to make their life easier... some buy a cool water circulating machine, and some buy big ice packs, various things to help you get out of a chair, put your socks on, etc. Are these items deductible, of they are NOT prescription items? Certainly my doctor does not prescribe big ice packs, nor many of the other helpful items. I would certainly not be buying these items if I was not having hip surgery, they are very needed. Just didn't know if they were deductible on my taxes as medical expenses. They really add up.
Thanks for any advice!


I had just one hip replaced. I got a gizmo that was to be helpful in getting my socks on: completely useless.

I got another that helped get stuff from the top shelves of my kitchen cabinets: device was nowhere near strong enough to even get a jar of jam off the top shelf.

I got a walker supplied by the hospital and it was really important for a week, but then a cane was enough for the next week or so. Now more of a nuisance than a help.

A gizmo to help scrub my back was useless. I had a regular long-handled back scrubbing brush that was better.

Elastic shoe laces so I did not have to tie my shoes was a help.

The hospital gave me a box to be filled with ice cubes that had hoses and a pump for the opposite of a heating pad. I never used it.

They also prescribed me a bottle of 30 Oxycodone HCl 5mg tablets for severe pain. I had no pain, so I never used them (they are tax deductible, but only if the medical expenses exceed that really high threshold).
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Devices do not have to be prescribed in order to be deductible. See IRS Pub. 502, Medical and Dental Expenses, www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p502.pdf for examples of deductible expenses. See in particular, the definition of medical expenses on page 2. Ultimately, you will have to determine which of your expenses qualify and which may be considered "beneficial to general health."

Ira
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Footsox,

If I am not mistaken, you have to itemized your return to be able to claim medical expenses.

Then, only the portion of medical expenses greater than 7.5% of your Adjusted Gross Income is allowed.

Take a look at Schedule A (1040) to see how it works.

Best of luck with your hip surgery.

PW
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I have recently had knee surgery and have a few comments and some comments regarding a previous post.

If you haven't been vaccinated for COVID yet, my doctor required that the vaccine sequence be completed at least two weeks before surgery. Timing didn't work so I delayed vaccination until a month after surgery. I went ahead with surgery before vaccination because the hospital where I had surgery doesn't treat COVID cases. Any patient testing positive is transferred to another local hospital.

I got another that helped get stuff from the top shelves of my kitchen cabinets: device was nowhere near strong enough to even get a jar of jam off the top shelf.

Unrelated to surgery I have a similar device. It does help retrieve small items from recesses where they fall, picking up small items from the floor while recovering, and retrieving not heavy unbreakable items from upper shelves. Agreed, they are totally useless for heavy items.

I got a walker supplied by the hospital and it was really important for a week, but then a cane was enough for the next week or so. Now more of a nuisance than a help.

A walker will only be used for a short period of time. A friend offered to lend me hers that she had from previous surgery. It was a low end model that was covered by Medicare. It worked fine. It is now lent to another of her friends that is having knee surgery.

Unlike a walker, canes aren't adjustable. I used a cane that came from my parent's house. It was to tall. If I had needed a cane for more than a couple of weeks, it would have been replaced.

Elastic shoe laces so I did not have to tie my shoes was a help.

Slip on shoes are easy. Socks were a challenge for awhile. Your physical therapist should work with you to show you how to safely put on shoes and socks.

The hospital gave me a box to be filled with ice cubes that had hoses and a pump for the opposite of a heating pad. I never used it.

It should be used. It isn't difficult. My hospital recommended buying and freezing appropriate sized bottled water (12 oz. for the one I have) and rotating the bottles. Worked great but still required swapping bottles in the middle of the night.

The automatic calf compression device was also provided by the hospital.

The cords and hoses are annoying but avoiding blood clots is important.

They also prescribed me a bottle of 30 Oxycodone HCl 5mg tablets for severe pain. I had no pain, so I never used them (they are tax deductible, but only if the medical expenses exceed that really high threshold).

I was prescribed Oxy ER and Oxy HCl 5mg tablets. Home health PT encouraged me to use the Oxy ER and it was a prescription that would not be refilled. It made me nauseated. The Oxy HCl made the room spin. Half tablets lessened the symptoms. Same as you, I didn't need the Oxy HCl and gave it up after taking a few half tablets.

The only good point was when my husband had a kidney stone in the middle of the night, I had a selection of medications available. My husbands meds from a previous episode were expired. His doctor was consulted and verified which of my meds he could use. Fortunately, he only needed Celebrex and a heating pad.
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Unlike a walker, canes aren't adjustable.

Mine was adjustable. In 1/2 inch increments. I started with where it seemed best, but I slouched, so I raised it 1n inch which was a big help. I raised it an additional 1/2 inch, and that was just right.
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JeanDavid:

{{{Unlike a walker, canes aren't adjustable.}}}

"Mine was adjustable. In 1/2 inch increments. I started with where it seemed best, but I slouched, so I raised it 1n inch which was a big help. I raised it an additional 1/2 inch, and that was just right."

I am with JD. Some canes are adjustable; mine certainly was, though I do not recall if it was 1/2 inch or 1 inch increments.

Regards, JAFO
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I am with JD. Some canes are adjustable; mine certainly was, though I do not recall if it was 1/2 inch or 1 inch increments.

Okay, I just used a cane (probably my grandfathers) that existed and didn't realize that there are new versions that are adjustable. If I had needed it for more that a short period of time, I would have acquired a more appropriate cane.

Home physical therapist pushed me from a walker too a cane and walking outside faster than I expected. It was appropriate but still walking outside less than a week after surgery was a surprise and a little scary.
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Thanks for all the tips and replies. I will definitely read IRS 502 for additional info. I appreciate all of your help.

Footsox
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Footsox,

Our local churches have 'medical lending items' that are donated.

You might try to research your area.

When I had a hip replacement, the visiting nurse got me an extended tub bench.
It was a game changer when I finally could shower. I used it for many weeks.

Like this
https://www.amazon.com/Carex-Tub-Transfer-Bench-Convertible/...

I had an rollator, but your local places might have one for you to borrow.
I found that much better than the bare bones walkers the hospital provided, but it would be (of course) based on how comfortable you are with it.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000TVTLE6/ref=redir_mobile_deskto...

Best of luck
nag
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