Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 2
Who knew? The UK Met Office has a new job opening for a space weather research scientist. However, I imagine it will be difficult to find a bright young researcher with expertise in FORTRAN. They may have heard about it from one of their professors....

www.metoffice.gov.uk/about-us/jobs/current-vacancies/002650

DB2
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
DB2:"However, I imagine it will be difficult to find a bright young researcher with expertise in FORTRAN. They may have heard about it from one of their professors...."


I visited one of my college friends out at the big government facility in Boulder...the one doing all the space/solar work with the giant super computers.

that was about 10-15 years ago...he's retired now like me...

At that time, ALL the Cray Super Computers ran a lot of VECTOR FORTRAN programming. That was the language of choice for solar research.

HOw all the admin stuff of getting data stored on the petabyte servers, the process control stuff, etc, was in other languages......

but all of his programs used VECTOR FORTRAN programming.

What did you think they were running on SuperComputers? Microsoft software?


t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I visited one of my college friends out at the big government facility in Boulder...the one doing all the space/solar work with the giant super computers. That was about 10-15 years ago...he's retired now like me...
At that time, ALL the Cray Super Computers ran a lot of VECTOR FORTRAN programming.


Who knew?

DB2
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
You'd think someone who had spent thousands of hours on this board debating 'climate models' would have a clue as to what went on behind the blinking lights of the computer mainframe control room, right?

----


"Chapel supports a multithreaded execution model via high-level abstractions for data parallelism, task parallelism, concurrency, and nested parallelism. Chapel's locale type enables users to specify and reason about the placement of data and tasks on a target architecture in order to tune for locality. Chapel supports global-view data aggregates with user-defined implementations, permitting operations on distributed data structures to be expressed in a natural manner. In contrast to many previous higher-level parallel languages, Chapel is designed around a multiresolution philosophy, permitting users to initially write very abstract code and then incrementally add more detail until they are as close to the machine as their needs require. Chapel supports code reuse and rapid prototyping via object-oriented design, type inference, and features for generic programming.

Chapel was designed from first principles rather than by extending an existing language. It is an imperative block-structured language, designed to be easy to learn for users of C, C++, Fortran, Java, Perl, Matlab, and other popular languages. While Chapel builds on concepts and syntax from many previous languages, its parallel features are most directly influenced by ZPL, High-Performance Fortran (HPF), and the Cray MTA™/Cray XMT™ extensions to C and Fortran."

http://chapel.cray.com/


---

Now, you know a bit about the programming languages on the Crays.

And there aren't any control rooms with 'blinking lights' any longer - only in hollywood movies. It's all done with a small room full of very large screen terminals.....and they control multiple computers...it takes a half dozen other computers computers just to get the data in and out of the Cray computers......


t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Supercomputers still rely heavily on Fortran. I would guess that all the big scientific and engineering codes still use Fortran, although other languages are mixed in for the user interface and post-processing data.

The Top500 project regularly ranks the fastest supercomputers in the world. Their benchmark still relies on Fortran.

"The TOP500 project ranks and details the 500 most powerful (non-distributed) computer systems in the world. The project was started in 1993 and publishes an updated list of the supercomputers twice a year.
...
The project aims to provide a reliable basis for tracking and detecting trends in high-performance computing and bases rankings on HPL, a portable implementation of the High-Performance LINPACK benchmark written in Fortran for distributed-memory computers."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TOP500
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
If you go to the annual super computing conference, held each year in November in various cities in NA you will see lots and lots of sessions on Fortran as well as products that use the latest massively parallel processors (GPUs) all programmed in Fortran.

Mike
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
The language of science Dr Bob. It is still a highly optimized, possibly THE most highly optimized, language out there and the scientists have been using it forever. They don't often hire programmers for that either.

Much of the Modtran libraries and much similar code, is sourced in FORTRAN. It is also often used underneath Mech. Engineering finite element programs.

I use it rarely but learned it first.

"A good programmer can write FORTRAN in any language" :-)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Who knew? The UK Met Office has a new job opening for a space weather research scientist. However, I imagine it will be difficult to find a bright young researcher with expertise in FORTRAN. They may have heard about it from one of their professors....

www.metoffice.gov.uk/about-us/jobs/current-vacancies/002650



Fortran's still quite popular for scientific computing. It's about as easy to program as MATLAB, and there're automatic parallelization and optimization options in the compiler (so it's fast).

Probably most scientific code is written by grad students, who don't tend to be proficient programmers. They don't have the time or desire to learn C++.

Meanwhile, Fortran has improved quite a bit over the years: Fortran 90 introduced modules (similar to classes in C++), and Fortran 95/2003 introduced pointers. New code can be a lot cleaner than the old code and doesn't involve horrific, convoluted GOTO statements.

~w
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
"Meanwhile, Fortran has improved quite a bit over the years: Fortran 90 introduced modules (similar to classes in C++), and Fortran 95/2003 introduced pointers. New code can be a lot cleaner than the old code and doesn't involve horrific, convoluted GOTO statements."



I learned FORTRAN (WHAT-FOUR?) progamming back in 1965 era...we had to use punchcards for the IBM card readers that shuffled the decks into the IBM 360 computers - one of the first 'solid state' computers......kept behind glass with lots of 'gate keepers' to keep us wimpy sophomores out of the world of blinking lights...... it was a pain in the butt to put it mildly with key punch errors.....

Of course it wasn't long before you used terminals to access your program and change it.

Even then there were all sorts of routines you could access.

When I started work in 1968, we had access to a GE time share system that had EE design programs on them....they likely ran in FORTRAN but we just had to enter tables of parameters and it would do circuit analysis for us..and a charge per minute of CPU time.

Now, you can do all that stuff on your desktop easy.....


I thought to GOTO stuff was in BASIC.... FORTRAN did the 'LOOP' stuff.





t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 9
DB2: I imagine it will be difficult to find a bright young researcher with expertise in FORTRAN.

Heh. I wish that were true.

In the real world, Fortran is the language of choice for scientific work on massively parallel multi-core computer architectures. To be more precise, it is the language of choice for writing the low- to mid-level numerical algorithms on which all higher-level code depends. Higher-level code can be written in anything -- it doesn't matter. But for low-level stuff, like finding the eigenvalues of million-dimensional matrices, conventional wisdom holds that nothing beats* the highly optimized Fortran compilers.

The state-of-the-art package of numerical algorithms is LAPACK, which is maintained and improved by a team of mathematicians in the next office down the hall from me. It is entirely written in Fortran 90, an updated object-oriented version of the old Fortran 77.

Fortran was already old when I learned it in 1967. I remember one wag in the Computer Science department saying, "I don't know what language I will be programming in when I retire, but I know it will be named 'Fortran'." That just about sums it up.

http://www.netlib.org/lapack/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPACK
http://arxiv.org/abs/0709.1272

Loren

* I have been having a running argument with the numerical jocks about this. I say, based on years of experience, that I can write hand-crafted assembler code that will beat anything produced by an optimizing Fortran compiler. The boys next door think I'm nuts, and swear by their compilers. Someday we will have to stage a contest to see who is right.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
"
* I have been having a running argument with the numerical jocks about this. I say, based on years of experience, that I can write hand-crafted assembler code that will beat anything produced by an optimizing Fortran compiler. The boys next door think I'm nuts, and swear by their compilers. Someday we will have to stage a contest to see who is right. "


You are probably right, but your hand-crafted assembler code will likely be for one machine, and likely be for a very specific task. Change any parameter and you have to change your 'hand-crafted' code.

Why don't you, in your spare time, just write the entire LINPACK test your hand-crafted assembler?

OH..don't have 10,000 man years...well, that's likely the problem.

You'd probably get it to run even faster if you went to computer system machine language, too!



t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I have been having a running argument with the numerical jocks about this. I say, based on years of experience, that I can write hand-crafted assembler code that will beat anything produced by an optimizing Fortran compiler. The boys next door think I'm nuts, and swear by their compilers. Someday we will have to stage a contest to see who is right.

This has the makings of a folk legend contest -- a sort of modern day 'Ballad of John Henry'.

DB2
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
This has the makings of a folk legend contest -- a sort of modern day 'Ballad of John Henry'.

"Before that compiler shall beat me down / I'll die with my keyboard in my hands."
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 6
LorenCobb wrote:
I remember one wag in the Computer Science department saying, "I don't know what language I will be programming in when I retire, but I know it will be named 'Fortran'."

That would be Tony Hoare (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Hoare), at least I've always heard it attributed to him. Usually quoted as "I don't know what the programming language of the year 2000 will look like, but I know it will be called FORTRAN." I first heard it in the late '70s I think, about the time I was working on the world's first production FORTRAN 77 compiler.

My favorite quote of his is: "There are two ways of constructing a software design: One way is to make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies, and the other way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies. The first method is far more difficult."

-IGU-
Print the post Back To Top