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The yanks are at it again,

George W Bush last night slapped heavy tariffs on steel imports in response to years of heavy lobbying from US steelmakers. Although less than the blanket 40% tariffs sought by the US steel industry, the tariffs of between 15%-30% are expected to have some impact on Australia's three steel producers - BHP Billiton (BHP), OneSteel (OST) and Smorgon Steel (SSX).


“An integral part of our commitment to free trade is our commitment to enforcing trade laws to make sure that America's industries and workers compete on a level playing field,” Bush said in a statement issued by the White House.

Powerful loby group in the USA the steel makers.

JR




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“An integral part of our commitment to free trade is our commitment to enforcing trade laws to make sure that America's
industries and workers compete on a level playing field,” Bush said in a statement issued by the White House.


It's an oxymoron to have "free trade" & "level playing field" in the same sentence.


http://www.bloomberg.com/au/front_news2.html?s=APIVpVBTCQXVzdHJh

``It's a knee-jerk reaction,' said Mark Cotton, an analyst at Macquarie Equities in Sydney. ``You can't rule out some sort of dumping' though the Australian government has restrictions in place to protect domestic producers, he said.

Maybe Australia's not squeaky clean either.

Barcoo
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Maybe Australia's not squeaky clean either.

Maybe your right but not to the same degree that the US has, at least to my memory. Thats what stuffed up BHPs steel output isn't it?

Anyways the Asian dumping has/is always going to be a problem & maybe it has to be countered by goverment protection. I'm not sure how I stand on this issue but my first feeling is one of goverments say/promote one policy but act counter to that policy in reality.

It's a mixed bag this free trade garb.

JR

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I'm not sure how I stand on this issue but my first feeling is one of goverments say/promote one policy but act counter to that policy in reality.

I agree with you.

But I wholeheartedly support Australia's stand to protect our agricultural, aquacultural, ecological integrity.
This is NOT a trade issue.
Actually I think the countries trying to sully Australia's name with this via the trade issue actually WANT to destroy that integrity to bring us back to their playing field. They see our integrity as an unfair advantage. Keep unprocessed Northern Hemisphere Salmon out of Tasmania I say, heck keep 'em out of Australia if possible.

Suppose they'll be trying to keep our beef out of Japan and Europe next.
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Keep unprocessed Northern Hemisphere Salmon out of Tasmania I say, heck keep 'em out of Australia if possible.

Barcoo
This whole free trade issue is so complex and is so tied up with national ideals that it is almost impossible to segregate a trade issue from a national issue.
The French see the preservation of their agriculture as a means of preserving their national identity whereas down here we see it as a simple trade issue.
.....keep EU salmon out of Australia
.....ditto NZ salmon out of Australia
.....keep Oz steel out of the US
.....keep NZ apples out of Oz because of fireblight even though it was
imported from Oz originally.
.....keep NZ lamb out of the US market
.....keep Hong Kong clothing out of NZ market
.....keep Carribbean bananas out of the EU
.....etc
.....etc

It's simply a nightmare !! The only thing that you can say with confidence is that only the players who have the economic clout win their case - the small players simply have to accept what they are given.
Regards
Harmy
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