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I realize that the Fool is a financial into source. Also retired
people are very mcuh interested in our incomes and outgos. But we
also have the time for other interests, and it ocurred to me that we
might be able to help each other. (Not in spelling, I'm from Ky and
proper spelling ranked below, moonshine, horses and basketball.

For instance I am an avid golfer. Thought I was pretty good once,
but now can't reach the par fours from the senior tees. When I do
get there I am a lousy putter.Have any of you tried this new hi tech
equipment? Have you found anything that seems to help the senior
shorter backswing player. What is it.

Have you discovered any enjoyable hobbies. Not just time killers
but something you found you really like.

Obviously you can operate a computer. But I found that it contained
millions of information sources that I now enjoy. For instance I was
always a Frankie Laine fan. The other day I just typed his name
in Google and was amazed at how much information was available..
He got married at age 84. Now i not only enjoy his voice, I envy,
other things about him.
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Have you found anything that seems to help the senior
shorter backswing player. What is it.


Hey gym0. I think you already mentioned that you play the senior tees but I was going to suggest moving forward. I started using the gold tees (one set of tees back from senior tees) right after I retired and it really made a big difference for me. I enjoy the game a whole lot more and I'm using shorter irons a lot more. I can control my short irons a lot better than the long irons.

Last year after I broke the shaft on my steel shafted 3 wood I bought a new set of Callaway woods with graphite shafts to replace the old woods. I always used the 3 wood to tee off with. Well with the new woods I forced myself to begin using the driver and to become comfortable with it. If you can keep the ball in play a driver will get the ball out there a lot farther than a 3 wood. I really like the Callaway woods.

You probably already know this but another suggestion is to spend some time on the putting green. It's frustrating to get on the green in regulation and then proceed to 3 putt. I think time spent practicing putting will pay dividends.

Good luck with the golf game.

Regards,

ImAGolfer
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Hi gym0,
I was pleased to see your post, and I agree--I would love to see more posts about what people are doing in retirement..what makes them want to get up in the morning.

I used to play golf when I was married to my first husband. I wish I would have kept playing golf...but I haven't picked up a club in about a decade. I wonder, have you ever read Gary Player's book, Fit for Golf? I am thinking perhaps you already work out because of your screen name..but Player's book is Golf specific.

For myself, to answer your query, my big thing has been oil painting for the last 3 years. In particular I am doing what is called "plein air"..I paint directly alla prima (alla prima means "all at once" Italian, I think) and I generally paint outdoors. I started off doing very crappy paintings in sugar-y garish colors. I took two workshops with a premier plein air painter and now I use a more natural palette, using more of the actual colors seen in nature. Oil painting is tough, I'll tell you..because it is frustrating. A lot of folks quit oil painting in the first few months, I certainly was close to throwing in the towel but I am really interested in both the failures and the successes, so I keep on. It was hard to put my ego aside in the beginning. I thought I was going to be so great at it! I found out one can paint in their mind's eye a lot easier than for real!

I like what you wrote about Frankie Laine and I also use the computer constantly. Honestly, I should use it less..then I would get more done around our house--but the computer is like a siren.
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Oh I just saw that your post was one month old! wow..this board doesn't get much action!
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A lot of folks quit oil painting in the first few months, I certainly was close to throwing in the towel but I am really interested in both the failures and the successes, so I keep on. It was hard to put my ego aside in the beginning. I thought I was going to be so great at it! I found out one can paint in their mind's eye a lot easier than for real!

Flibbertygibbet


When my Mom turned 65 she turned to painting – never had done it before but, as she said, now I'm 65 I can do anything I want – and she became good at it. So good, in fact, her paintings were shown at a local gallery. I don't think I've seen her so pleased when this happened.

Now she's passed on and we three kids shared her paintings and they're a nice legacy.

The question is what do we do in our retirement years and, for me, retirement isn't just not doing what you did before retirement. I completely agree with the thought that it's a time for a change as in it's another phase of your life. And, to tell the truth, after two plus years of being retired from 30 years as a consultant I am still being amazed at the opportunities I now see but didn't before – and that's not only due to a different pace of life.

I still get four newspapers a day and do spend time on the Internet yet (it's a miracle) I find I have more time in which to do other things without feeling I should do other things. As a result I have half-completed projects all over the place and some I am sure I'll finish some of them but other just abandon them and not feel guilty.

Since retirement I started two new companies and they take a few days a week yet, when at them, I don't run them (I hired competent people and let them run the businesses) but what I have enjoyed is counter work meeting people who buy stuff. Doing this really does turn my crank.

Plus, being a white-haired geezer, they think I am a font of knowledge – and here I apply what I did for many years: stay one page ahead.

I admire painters since my capability ceases at stick figures and the average eight year-old can run rings around me. However, I can best that eight year-old at knowing proper propeller sizes for specific horsepower engines and hull design. Jeez, what are they teaching in schools these days?

MichaelR


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I would love to see more posts about what people are doing in retirement..what makes them want to get up in the morning.

Here's my contribution, posted on 10/21/05 to another retirement board:

http://boards.fool.com/Message.asp?mid=23194971

Since that post I've not been pursuing Spanish so much, but I am tutoring a couple I met through a friend. I just got a decent computer and some photo-editing software (Elements, little brother of Photoshop) and plan to spend some time learning to take and edit digital pics.

DW's last day of work is next Thursday.

--fleg
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Aside from doing the yardwork myself instead of hiring it done, I play lots of golf, travel several weeks a year, and go to as many Bruce Springsteen concerts as I can. Best part about the latter is I now have time to arrive early in the day so I get into the Pit right up by the stage.

I also do some volunteer work, read, enjoy movies, and all the other things I never had time for when I was working. And I love the freedom from a set schedule so I can decide on the spur of the moment to do something unplanned.

It all works for me and I've had very few days in the last 6 1/2 years when I felt bored. Should I ever get bored with this life, I'll find some part time work I enjoy. But I don't forsee that happening for a long, long time.

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Should I ever get bored with this life, I'll find some part time work I enjoy. But I don't foresee that happening for a long, long time.

Billjam


I think boredom is when you realize you're wasting your own time and boredom is an indicator to do something different – not different just to occupy time but something so different that the kids and their kids say, “Whut the hell is Dad (or Mom or Grandpa or Grandmom) doin'”?”

Flibbertygibbet is honing her artistic bent. Was she a painter before? Nope. Now she is and it may not be a paint-smeared smock in a gentile environment but she could go Toulouse-Lautrec on us, bugger off to Paris and paint French 'courtesans' or turn up at City Hall saying, “I'm here to paint the ceiling. It will take 12 years.”

My kids said when I retired, “Now you can take it easy,” and I gave them the fisheye. What did they want me to do? Buy a rocker and a shawl and have people say, “Did anyone dust off Michael today?”

Possibly I am railing against the inevitable but until the inevitable, look out, I may embarrass everyone in the family as I do something they think is out of my 'sphere'. Already they're somewhat concerned because I haven't 'slowed down' but chosen to do other stuff.

Agree with you, billjam, you n' me ain't gonna be ever bored.

MichaelR


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I've been "retired" about 17 years now and all I can say is that there aren't enough hours in the day to get all the things done that need doing!

While it is nice not to have to follow a schedule set by someone else, one's property demands when it gets mowed, when trees/salad greens,etc. get planted, and when to spray for bugs, etc!

Of course, I could choose not to do anything of the sort and just let the place grow over, but that decision is mine to make and I am pleased to have that choice!

Regards,

Grumpy
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Hello MichaelR and Billjam and others applicable:

My wife and I are too busy to be bored. What with computing, photography, painting in watercolor and acrylics, travel in our motorhome, gardening, visiting with friends, relatives, and neighbors, the simple chores and pleasures of everyday life, reading, listening to music, and trying to keep up to date with the news and events, and many more things that don't come to mind at this moment. Sometimes we joke that we don't know how we had enough time to work before we retired! Bored, we are too busy to ever be bored.

Huge
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