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A while back, 2018, I replaced an aged Sears Craftsman chain drive opener with a Ryobi, battery backed up opener... No way DW could lift our 2 car door as its a dual track, low ceiling setup, so the top section has to be pulled in, not lifted vertically. Firestorm lesson from BIL's loss..

All's been well, other than realigning the safety sensors, but yesterday, it came up 2" and stopped, beeping.. Hmmm, I thought it had lost its settings, so proceed to leave it unplugged, made sure the battery was charged. But today as I went to reset the open & closed settings, it could barley lift it.. Hmmm.. Yup, broken spring on the right side, maybe while I was gone. no idea..

Called the garage door guys, waiting for them now... they replaced one set in the past, too spooky for me, I even made up the tools, last time but chickened out.. 3/8" rods, turn by turn... Nope..

OK, he came by, measured the existing, checked the rollers, cables, headed back to the shop... It was the owner, a few more years on him, but only 72, younger than me, still going.. So it turns out if they don't have them in stock it could be a couple weeks after ordering, seems there is a liability issue, beside transportation headaches, like everything else... So we closed the door, await the phone call, when he has them in hand..

So as we still are dealing with the paint job shuffle of the household, we have enough to keep me busy...
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Last time I had a garage door opener problem, I called the Overhead Door Company. They came right over and fixed it in an hour for $100.

Money well spent.
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I don't recall what it cost for spring replacement in 2003, but my BIL had his replaced a couple years back, for $275, so for the area, we seem to be in the ball park...

Another option is to replace the whole door, apparently current systems use enclosed springs... Anyway, for now only the springs... 10,000 cycles they say... 15 years, so we were due.. Also see they were supposed to be lubricated annually... Never heard that before!

Or I could try doing it myself, as I once considered, but I'd rather let the guys with the contractors license just do it... Supporting another local small business..
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Yes, I'd keep door replacement cost in mind before making an expensive repair. Prices start at about $800 installed when I had mind done abt 20 years ago. I'm sure you can spend much more.

Garage doors do last a long time. It helps to keep the tracks clean and wheels/pullies oiled. But eventually everything mechanical wears out.

If its over 20 yo or giving you trouble consider replacing it.
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but I'd rather let the guys with the contractors license just do it... Supporting another local small business..

\You could try doing it yourself and support your local hospital or funeral home.
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Overhead Door Company in St. Louis is a local company. Been around forever. I don't know if they have operations in other areas.

https://overheaddoorstlouis.com/?source=ohdgoogle&gclid=...
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That's what I was thinking. There is a tremendous amount of energy in those springs. It's one of those things I do not consider DIY. Not even going to attempt it.

A former coworker once heard a loud 'bang', went into the garage, and the spring had let loose. I'm not entirely clear on what happened, but apparently the door spring broke and somehow dented the roof of his wife's minivan.
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I think you will find the people you call anywhere listed as "Overhead Door" are franchisees. Here is the home base. https://www.overheaddoor.com/home

If you see the red logo at this site you can be money they are a franchisee.
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apparently current systems use enclosed springs...

The old style is one coil spring on each side, stretched by cables and pulleys. Hopefully there is a safety wire running through the center of the spring so that if/when it snaps it can't go flailing around. If you have that style without the safety wires I think it is worth having those added.

The newer style is torsion springs mounted horizontally above the door on the inside of the header. The springs are still coils, one for each side, but instead of stretching they are twisted. The cables that lift the door get wound around drums at each end, drums that are attached to the springs. The entire mechanism is pretty much a unit.

https://www.google.com/search?q=garage+door+torsion+spring&a...
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And of course when you talk about springs, much depends on how heavy the door is. Most doors these days are light weight, but there probably are still some heavy wooden monsters out there. The heavy doors take larger springs to balance the weight.
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The danger is that all that energy and that spring shatters from one too many flexes, no guarantee it stays in just two trapped pieces, there could be shrapnel... I suppose a heavy canvas sleeve could be added to cover, encapsulate it... I'd never heard of oiling that spring until I read a little deeper, earlier... So many things we take for granted...

I did find the spring, 31" long at both Home Depot, Lowes, but didn't chase it any further, they also sell the windup bars, the support bars, but mot for thus guy...

I did accomplish something today, however, replaced the control panel on our Bosch Dishwasher... Easy, peasy.. about 10 screws, T6 & T8, move the buttons from the old to the new, pop it back together, throw the breaker back on, done! I'd put it off a while with all the other turmoils here, it was time..

Still trying to toss books I haven't looked at in ages, several astronomy books, nice at the time, but pointless to keep in today's Google, Bing, DuckDuck world...Building a stash of electronics scrap as well.. To the dumps!

Discussed surplus tools with the garage door owner when he was here, showed him my stash of pipe wrenches, told of woodworking tools, he said he has 4 table saws, is in the same boat, family does their own thing, unrelated to the hobbies, interests we had these many years... Maybe break down, sell at the local flea market one day...

weco
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I have this newer ones on the main garage, but out in my shop I have the older springs, pulleys, and yes, safety cables.. Used much less frequently than the garage, as in long material needs to have the space, like when I was doing the crown molding.. No opener on it, I actually blocked the motor area by adding a hanging rack below the rafters, so I'd have to take part of that down to add the opener.. I am thinking about it, tho, just a simple opener, no remotes, no backup power... Hmmm...
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Still trying to toss books I haven't looked at in ages, several astronomy books

Its easy enough to list them for sale as used books on Amazon. Some are not worth much but others will surprise you. Some will go for over $100.

I have a large collection of books from a career in chemistry. I have about 200 listed for sale and sell half a dozen per year. Takes patience, but people will buy them.
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Re: book selling on Amazon

There were paperbacks I'd picked up way back when I took some night courses, not of much value.. I'm gradually semi-sorting books by hobby, interests, many more I took out to the shop years ago, Granger or other catalogs of the day, some need to be brought back in, others outdated, replaced by current copies.. Others I value, like old Montana magazines, years of Fine Woodworking, Fine Homebuilding.. Actually need another bookcase in here, but, I've limited space..

Hmm, couldd build one under the window... Like I need another project!
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I had a spring break on my a few years ago, and hired a guy to replace it. He gave me an option. He could replace the spring and expect it to last ten years or so. Or, he could add a second spring.

Two springs double the parts cost, but he would have charged me the same labor whether he installed one or two springs. But the benefits...

With two springs, each one is carrying half the load, so the expected lifetime of each spring goes way up (probably not the full twenty years--fifteen, maybe?) And when one spring eventually does break, the other one will likely be able to do the job of opening the door until you can get it replaced.

I went for the two-springs option.
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I did the same thing. My one spring was replaced with two. I hate even typing this because it's been 10 or more years since I've replaced one.

PSU
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All the garage doors with extension springs I've seen start with two springs, one on each side. The recommendations I've read say that if one breaks, replace both.
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I hate even typing this because it's been 10 or more years since I've replaced one.

Forgot to mention that from what I read the measure isn't years but cycles. The number 10,000 stick in my head for when an extension spring is nearing its useful life. Twice a day - coming and going - ever day puts that around 13 to 14 years.
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That 10,000 cycles & 14 years is what my door guy said...

So even with my two springs, it still ate at least the one... But, yes, we're replacing both...

I called today, see if there was any news, answering machine, no callback by the end of the day..

Every day a reminder on how much we use that opener! Buncha family coming over tomorrow (birthdays), had to pack all the stuff in the front door.. Bummer..
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My reading also is the life of an extension spring is about 10,000 cycles. I don't see any reason using two weaker springs on each side of a door will increase the average number of cycles a spring lasts. It does however seem clear after X cycles 1 of 4 springs is more likely to fail than 1 of two springs.

I have also read the life of torsion springs is much longer - want to say in the range of double - but maybe not that much.
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These are torsion springs that have the 10k cycle life, it seems...

Original builder's wood/plywood door, late '60s, had double extension springs on each side, and the mechanism also was a balancing act.. The old Sears Craftsman opener handled it fine, had one spring break, replaced it, must have been in the '70s...
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Forgot to mention that from what I read the measure isn't years but cycles. The number 10,000 stick in my head for when an extension spring is nearing its useful life. Twice a day - coming and going - ever day puts that around 13 to 14 years.

Then I'm on borrowed time. Most of the time there are at least 4 cycles per day. Other days even higher.
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Opener guy came & went, done! Had to reset the Open & Close points on the Ryobi GDO, a little confusion, but in the end I won, got 'em set to soft close & soft open fully.. Guy lubed everything, coil springs, rollers, axles, all of it, mostly with motor oil, lithium spray in the rollers, too, so double coverage, nice & quiet, smooth...

Onward!
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