No. of Recommendations: 0
No, not a rant about prices in general, more about the pricing distribution between grades of gasoline. All my life, the standard was you have one price for regular, add 10-15¢ for mid-grade, then another 10-15¢ more for premium. So the total spread was 20 or 30 cents from regular to premium.

Where I live in south Florida, this isn't the case. The most recent example is a Chevron station I was at the other night.

Regular $2.49
Mid-grade $3.09
Premium $3.19

That's a 60¢ spread from regular to mid, and 70¢ spread to premium. Seems odd, but it's actually pretty common at gas stations around here...

Is this now the norm elsewhere, or just a regional pricing artifact? Heavy competition for lowest regular price? Or tighter supplies for higher grades of gas (I suspect this area has a higher concentration of luxury vehicles needing those higher grades)? And yes, some of my cars do require premium...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
This morning at Costco, 87 octane was $2.09 and 93 octane was $2.59. We use 87 octane in all of my vehicles. As usual, some people were putting 93 octane in cars that do not require it.

PSU
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
"Is this now the norm elsewhere, or just a regional pricing artifact? Heavy competition for lowest regular price? Or tighter supplies for higher grades of gas (I suspect this area has a higher concentration of luxury vehicles needing those higher grades)? And yes, some of my cars do require premium... "

Heh heh.....you bought an expensive car that needs premium and the oil companies are going to sock it to you........

I've never owned a car that needed premium and won't.......

Way back when, Sunoco offered an even cheaper gas to regular.....Sunoco 190.....a few pennies cheaper. THe WV ran fine on it.....

Yep, it costs more to have premium...and service stations need extra tanks, extra pumps, for those 'few' who can afford premium levels of gas. Of course, they are going to charge a bunch more.....the 'few' got to pay the overhead on those tanks, extra deliveries and delivery times to fiddle with 3 grades of gas instead of just one, the extra additives and refining steps.....and extra pumps.....

Next time buy a car that needs only regular gas...or an EV so you won't have to worry about gas at all.

Saw a Tesla at a traffic light today....... we got a Tesla dealer in town now.....


t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
As usual, some people were putting 93 octane in cars that do not require it.

My previous car owners manual stated that 93 octane was required but it knocked when given 87 octane.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
My previous car owners manual stated that 93 octane was required but it knocked when given 87 octane.

Well, your car obviously needed 93 octane so I wasn't talking about you. I was talking about the people whose cars don't need 93 octane.

PSU
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
Heh heh.....you bought an expensive car that needs premium

Yes, and I'm quite happy with all of them (3 of our 4 cars require premium). It's the living part of LBYM. A couple of extra bucks each time I fill up isn't gonna shift the date I retire.


Yep, it costs more to have premium...and service stations need extra tanks, extra pumps, for those 'few' who can afford premium levels of gas. Of course, they are going to charge a bunch more.....the 'few' got to pay the overhead on those tanks, extra deliveries and delivery times to fiddle with 3 grades of gas instead of just one, the extra additives and refining steps.....and extra pumps.....
I've never been to a gas station that didn't offer at 2-3 grades of gasoline, minimum. Some have 4 (speedway/racetrac?), and many also sell diesel. I don't deny that there's overhead, I just find it interesting that the spread has opened up more than I remember historically. Wondering if there's a specific reason for it...is supply for higher grades just tighter in my region?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
<<No, not a rant about prices in general, more about the pricing distribution between grades of gasoline. All my life, the standard was you have one price for regular, add 10-15¢ for mid-grade, then another 10-15¢ more for premium. So the total spread was 20 or 30 cents from regular to premium.

Where I live in south Florida, this isn't the case. The most recent example is a Chevron station I was at the other night.

Regular $2.49
Mid-grade $3.09
Premium $3.19>>



These days, you can't find regular in Seattle for less than $3.60/gallon. Washington State fuel taxes are part of the liberal effort to impose carbon taxes on people.


As a side benefit, they continue their war of the working class by their delight in imposing regressive taxes. Of course, they regularly rant against "regressive taxes," mainly when they are promoting state income taxes. But they are champions of raising existing regressive taxes and imposing new ones.

If they were opposed to regressive taxes, they could do so by NOT PASSING NEW ONES AND CUTTING EXISTING REGRESSIVE TAXES!


Here's a Seattle Times article on Seattle area taxes as the most regressive in the nation:

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/data/seattle-taxes...


Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Here in North Austin TX, $1.93 regular; $2.16 mid; and $2.39 premium.

Looks like a $0.23 spread between each category?

These are the cheap gas places: HEB grocer, Walmart, Racetrack, etc. There are higher priced places. I see some places with regular at $2.29-2.34.

I got regular for $1.91, in Temple TX, over the weekend.

🙂
ralph
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
No, not a rant about prices in general, more about the pricing distribution between grades of gasoline. All my life, the standard was you have one price for regular, add 10-15¢ for mid-grade, then another 10-15¢ more for premium. So the total spread was 20 or 30 cents from regular to premium.

</snip>


I've been baffled by the 2 gas stations near me. The Arco station is always 50 cents/gal cheaper than the Shell station literally right across the street. Yet there are enough motorists who apparently are unable to read to keep the Shell station in business.

intercst
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
This past week, my car has begun misfiring, causing the check engine light to come on. Took it to the mechanic, and the computer showed that the misfires were happening on random cylinders, and not consistently, so he ruled out a bad coil. The plugs were replaced last year, so likely not that either. He guesses it was bad gas, or perhaps moisture in the gas tank. So I filled up with non-ethanol gas this time, the first time in many years (decades?).

No misfires since the fillup.

The gas was about 10% more per gallon than the ethanol gas, but the MPG are supposed to be better.

I'll track the mileage over the next couple of weeks and see if the MPG actually improve.

Tim
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
A couple of extra bucks each time I fill up isn't gonna shift the date I retire.

If you add, say, 15 gallons per fill-up at 60 cents extra per gallon, that's $9 extra. If you fill up each of those premium cars once a month, that's $27/month or $324/year. not a lot of money for you, but it might be for others (but those folks probably don't own 4 cars-).

ASIDE
When I was working poor, I had $2/week for gas in our budget--which bought 8 gallons at the time!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
interest writes: Yet there are enough motorists who apparently are unable to read to keep the Shell station in business.

I've a buddy who, when he needs gas, just stops at the first gas station he sees.
Where you and I "see" the sign with the prices, I'm convinced he does NOT see that. He only sees a place to get gas. He's not thinking at all about the price, only that he needs gas.

🤨
ralph ... is convinced that LBYM folks have a talent for "seeing" the "price/cost" and for looking for the most economical options.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
At a BP station by my work they charge a full $2 more per gallon for premium.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
"Is this now the norm elsewhere, or just a regional pricing artifact? Heavy competition for lowest regular price? Or tighter supplies for higher grades of gas (I suspect this area has a higher concentration of luxury vehicles needing those higher grades)? And yes, some of my cars do require premium..." jeffbrig
---------------------------


Whatever the market will bear. Whatever folks are willing to pay. That's capitalism. That's how it works. The goal of for profit companies is to make as much profit as possible. "The business of America is business."


Art
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Whatever the market will bear. Whatever folks are willing to pay. That's capitalism. That's how it works. The goal of for profit companies is to make as much profit as possible. "The business of America is business."

It would be nice to believe that but I'm not sure it's always true. Recently, the gas stations near a Sam's Club were all around $2.16 per gallon for 87 octane. At the same time 5 miles away near NC State campus, all the stations were $2.55 per gallon for 87 octane. All of the stations should be paying about the same wholesale price. Without the competition from Sam's Club, the gas stations near the university give the appearance of collusion among the station owner to keep the price high for the students nearby that likely are not going to travel far to buy lower priced gasoline. The $0.39 price difference appears to be more than just higher operating costs for that area. There have been times in the past that the prices were equal or lower than other parts of the town, sometimes significantly lower suggesting past price wars. This higher price situation gives off the appearance that the station owners have gotten together to keep the price high instead of lowering the price to attract more business over their neighboring stations.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Speculation mode ON...

There is one stretch of Rt 5 here in Connecticut that my daughter tells me is consistently cheaper for reasons not known to anyone I've talked to. Think ten or fifteen cents.

What is really hard to factor in is the configuration of the distribution system. How does the gasoline reach the area? Ship? Pipeline? Rail? Truck? Where are the hubs that transition it to the local delivery trucks? How far is the hub from the stations that it services? Are all the hubs open, or are they brand-specific? And so on. On average you would expect it all to even out, and if you look at thing broadly enough I expect they mostly do. But when you get to individual localities these sort of variables can impact one area differently than another.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
"What is really hard to factor in is the configuration of the distribution system. How does the gasoline reach the area? Ship? Pipeline? Rail? Truck? Where are the hubs that transition it to the local delivery trucks? How far is the hub from the stations that it services? Are all the hubs open, or are they brand-specific? And so on. On average you would expect it all to even out, and if you look at thing broadly enough I expect they mostly do. But when you get to individual localities these sort of variables can impact one area differently than another. "

It's a bit messy

Most gasoline in the US goes by pipeline from refineries in TX and LA north. THere are local refineries however, all around the country - in IL, in CA, and other states.

Most gasoline goes through the pipeline system to the midwest and east coast. Some gasoline is hauled by ships to ports along FL and the east coast all the way up to ME but it is a lot more explosive than 'oil'.

The pipelines carry everything from aviation gas (100 octane) to regular to premium gas, to heating oil, and everything in between.

The gasoline, whether from distant refinery or one closer by, goes to distribution centers not to far from the market for those distribution centers.

Now, with the ethanol mandate, ethanol must be hauled by railcar from the midwest all over the US. It cannot go through pipelines. Ethanol corrodes existing pipelines and no one has ever gotten permission to build a new line for just ethanol. (probably all high quality stainless steel (not strong) and special seals/gaskets and pumps). So.....it usually takes a lot of diesel to haul the ethanol to your local distribution point.

At your local distribution point, ethanol, up to 10% and maybe going to 15%, is added to and contaminates regular gas, reducing its fuel mileage by 10%, and maybe up to 15% in the future, and then hauled by tanker truck over roads to your local gas station. It has multiple tanks within. You cannot send ethanol blend , either, through pipelines.

At your local distribution point, additives specified by the brand are added in. Detergents and anti-knock stuff and whiz bang whatever. Your truck can haul Exxon gas in one tank, and K-mart gas in another tank. A typical truck will have 3 or 4 compartments so the truck can visit a few stations and 'fill 'em up'.

My local truck fills up the Shell station, and visits the Kroger Store gas station next a quarter mile away. I've watched it a few times.

A good selling gas station can require 2 or 3 or 4 tank loads a day - like at an interstate rest area.....the entire truck.

Your local 7-11 might need a load every 3 days.

Most gas stations sell a whole lot more regular than high test.

In certain states like OK, you can buy 100% pure gas - no ethanol contamination.....but at higher price than contaminated regular by about 30 cents. You get better mileage with it. It's much safer for old engines, outboard motors, cook stoves, gas lanterns, and old jet skis, and anything else over 20 years old including cars!


t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Washington State has several large refineries north of Seattle on Puget Sound. Supertankers, railroads and trucks all have ready access to the refineries, and a major pipeline carries refined products south to Seattle, jet fuel to seatac airport and south to Portland, Oregon.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Those "premium" prices make me glad I drive a regular vehicle that uses regular gas.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
This morning at Costco, 87 octane was $2.09 and 93 octane was $2.59.

We buy gas for both our SUV's at Costco.

When I filled up at our local West Texas Costco on Saturday the price for premium was $2.249.

Our Costco doesn't sell diesel although some do, here's a list of those stores:

https://www.costco.com/gasoline-diesel.html
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Walmart gas station was $1.83 for regular here. Didn't bother to look for premium.....


t.
Print the post Back To Top