Skip to main content
No. of Recommendations: 0
This thread is for Thuvia. :-)

C. J. Cherryh. Stick to the SF, it's much better than her fantasy. Cyteen will blow you away. She's also got two great series about a human colony on a plane with an alien culture (starts with Foreigner) that is fantastic.

Robin Hobb - great textured fantasy, even if the ending will make you want to throw it across the room.

Guy Gavriel Kay - same as above, but with better endings. Really rich preudo-historical fantasy.

Brin, who 6 just mentioned, is fantastic hard SF that reminds me of Niven's style.

Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars series (Red Mars, Green Mars, Blue Mars) that tells the story of the colonization and terraforming of Mars is absolutely fantastic. A lot like Stephenson in structure, but not quite as humorous.

Any other suggestions?

-mapletree
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Thanks Mapletree. I've printed out your list.

Now I have one for you. Have you read Steven Brust's Vlad Taltos series? They're fantastic. The world he creates is very well done and they're very funny. Great dialogue. Vlad Taltos is an assassin and low level crime boss (I don't know how else to describe it). The first one is Jhereg (perhaps you recognize the name from one of LBYM's posters). I highly recommend it.

He has a parallel series called Phoenix Guards which is his affectionate tribute to Dumas. They're well worth reading.

Thuvia


Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Now I have one for you. Have you read Steven Brust's Vlad Taltos series? They're fantastic. The world he creates is very well done and they're very funny. Great dialogue. Vlad Taltos is an assassin and low level crime boss (I don't know how else to describe it). The first one is Jhereg (perhaps you recognize the name from one of LBYM's posters). I highly recommend it.

He has a parallel series called Phoenix Guards which is his affectionate tribute to Dumas. They're well worth reading.


Yes, yes! I knew I had forgotten so many of my favorites! I've read both of the Phoenix Guard books, but I've had a hard time getting my hands on the Vlad Taltos series. My local library system doesn't have all of them. So I've read about half of them, and out of order, which is extremely frustrating. Those books are very good; their tone swings from upbeat to depressing in a very realistic way. I read an interview with him - he said his marriage was breaking up as he wrote the book in which Vlad becomes estranged from his wife, and he didn't even realize it until later....

I've also read Brokedown Palace, which is connected somewhat to the Taltos world. And the epistolary novel he wrote with Bull is worthwhile, but dense.

Other favorites I omitted: Watt-Evans. I really enjoy his light fantasy. And Tim Powers writes great modern and historical fantasies. They're very compelling, even if, after three or four of them, you realize they're all the same book: young man becomes educated in the ways of a magical system and uses it to defeat evil and rescue Tess Trueheart.

-mapletree
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I hear tell that the next in the Phoenix Guard series "The Count of Adrilanka" (sp?) is due out this year. Hope it's true.

The only one I haven't read is Athyra. It seems almost impossible to get unless you want to pay some bucks. It was the same with "Phoenix" until they came out with "Taltos" and "Phoenix" together in one book in January. His books are so much fun. I can't understand why they go out of print.

Thuvia
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
James P. Hogan. Real Science Fiction, with emphasis on the science.

Naturally, he has to make some things up in order for his stories to work, but the seams don't usually show at all...the stories are very credible within their own framework.

He and I correspond fairly regularly. Right now, we are discussing the origins of Venus, said topic stimulated by his book Cradle of Saturn (he is a Velikovskian).

The Genesis Machine was, IMO, one of the best hard-science fiction books I have read in many years. But The Two Faces of Tomorrow is right there with it.

RealTime Interrupt is timely, hugely probable (it'll happen, within 20 years) and with some very interesting twists.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
James P. Hogan. Real Science Fiction, with emphasis on the science.

I'd read one or two of Hogan's books back in college and thought them well-written but since my preference is for fantasy, I didn't read many.

Venus is a very odd planet, compared to the other terresial planets, in its revolution, rotation and climate. It's also interesting how most pagan religions that equate the planets to their gods have the arrive of the goddess represented by Venus as a late arrival to their pantheon. And how the god represented by Mars is generally a war god and considered dangerous and in need of appeasement.

Carl Sagan and Immanuel Velicovsky by Charles Ginehthal, 1990 (sadly OOP) is a very interesting read of how Sagan (deliberately??) misrepresented Velicovsky's theory and evidence to other scientists in journals and papers on Velicovsky's works. Sagan even blasted Velicovsky for publishing without getting a peer review first, when Sagan himself did the same thing in Parade magazine several times.

Moonglade
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Carl Sagan and Immanuel Velicovsky by Charles Ginehthal, 1990 (sadly OOP) is a very interesting read of how Sagan (deliberately??) misrepresented Velicovsky's theory

I need to pick up a copy of that book. I never thought much of Sagan; his Cosmos series was simply wonderful, but his science writing was, to my mind, too opinionated. I think the facts should lead us where they lead us, not the other way around - and I think Sagan is guilty of that.

Hogan and I have been having a discussion for a year now, off and on, about Venus. He is firmly convinced that Venus is a new planet. I confess that I have gotten interested and have been spending a lot of time on it. Hogan has provided me with some very interesting leads and resources.

It does seem to me that there are some serious discrepancies in some of the data analysis - and there are a number of things that appear to not fit at all. Also, making the assumption that Venus is a new planet does seem to account for some of these discrepancies rather neatly. Follow the facts, and go where they lead.

But then, the question becomes "where did Venus come from" and if it is new, how is its orbit so round.

Actually, in the last week or so I have made a few posts on the Astronomy board here at TMF on the topic, trying to stimulate some discussion, but with little success.

Thing is, I really would like to answer the question to my satisfaction. In order to do that, I would need to do a lot of research, and review a lot of data, and review a lot of the analysis. I don't have the time, although if someone would pay me I would make the time.

But I have become very interested and I am gradually amassing a lot of data.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
RealTime Interrupt is timely, hugely probable (it'll happen, within 20 years) and with some very interesting twists.

What is RealTime Interrupt?

Thuvia
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Velicovsky believed it was a comet captured by the sun's gravity, as I recall. It's original orbit would have been less round, leading to a near miss (near hit?) with Mars and the Earth, before it settled into its current pattern. Look at Pluto's orbit, it's so eliptical that sometimes Pluto is closer than Neptune.

I suspect the Astronomy board would be inclined to follow the lead of conventional astronomers, not theories that would be considered radical. Velicovsky's "sin" was in choosing to take circumstantial evidence such as mythology and, presuming it accurately described what people saw happening, try and determine what might have lead to those observations. Why a society would claim that the sun used to rise in the west and then changed to rise in the east. He decided it wasn't a mistaken observation, but an accurate one. The mid-east story of the sun stopping in the sky (I know, the Earth stopped, not the sun) is paralleled by a South American tale of an extended darkness.

Other tidbits: The temperature of Venus exceeds that of Mercury, even though Mercury is closer to the sun. On Venus, if you could see the sun rise through the atmosphere, it would rise in the west. And a day on Venus is longer than a year (it spins so slowly that it takes longer to make one rotation that it does to make revolution.) It's a very intriging little planet.

Moonglade
(who loved her college astronomy courses)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
What is RealTime Interrupt?

The man-machine interface (virtual reality) gets to be good enough that the human mind can't tell the difference. Then, there is this study, where unwitting "volunteers" hook up to the computer...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
If you have not read the "Amber Spyglass" series (3 books), read it now, it is exceptional.

I forget the name of the author, but the third in the series is on the bestseller shelves right now.

It is really good.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
The author of the "Amber Spyglass" series (actually it's called "His Dark Materials") is Philip Pullman.

First one is "The Golden Compass," second is "The Subtle Knife," third is "The Amber Spyglass."

The world in this series mirrors our own, but each person has a shape-changing daemon as a constant companion. At maturity, one's daemon settles into a permanent form. The main character is a little girl who doesn't have parents and lives at a English university. running rather wild. Children have been vanishing and there is much speculation. Much of what you learn comes from the eaves-dropping activities of the litle girl.

At least all the books are out and you won't have to wait a year or two between books, like I did. If you like alternate realities with a spunky heroine, talking armor-wearing polar bears, and ancient but young-looking witches who don't feel cold and fly around on tree branches, and question the motives of estabished religions, you will like this series.

Moonglade
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Much better description than mine, lol.

It's the best fantasy I've read in a long, long time, full of really good, imaginative characters. I read all three in the space of a couple of weeks, couldn't put them down.

Anyone else eagerly awaiting the next Harry Potter?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Anyone else eagerly awaiting the next Harry Potter?

I'm waiting for the next Harry Potter with dread in my heart. Rowling said there would be more deaths. I'm convinced someone in the Weasley family is going to get nailed. I love Mr. and Mrs. Weasley and I bet it'll be the father. I also wouldn't be surprised if Percy goes over to Voldemort.

Thuvia
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Anyone else eagerly awaiting the next Harry Potter?

=======================================================

I'm waiting for the next Harry Potter with dread in my heart. Rowling said there would be more deaths. I'm convinced someone in the Weasley family is going to get nailed. I love Mr. and Mrs. Weasley and I bet it'll be the father. I also wouldn't be surprised if Percy goes over to Voldemort.

Thuvia


I think Percy going over to Voldemort is a good call - there have been a number of hints about the deficiencies in his character and his lack of sympathy with the rest of his family.

I too would be devastated if any of the Weasley's got the chop but I'd thought that Hagrid was more likely to be one we wave goodbye to. I can see him dying a hero's death to help Harry, or one of the others, and being big he'd take a long time to die in order to wring more tears out of us.

I hope everyone lives happily ever after, but it is unlikely that all of them will.

And when will sex rear its head in the lives of our young heroes? That will be tough for JKR to handle given the large number of young readers.

TK
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I'm going to be really ticked of if she kills off Hagrid.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
No, not Hagrid. <wailing>

Actually, I wonder when and if Dumbledore and Voldemort are going to go mano a mano. I have a feeling Dumbledore is doomed, he'll probably be betrayed. Or, Harry will be Romeo, trying to stop/help the fight between Dumbledore (Mercutio) and Voldemort (Tybalt) and wind up helping off Dumbledore. How's that for lifelong guilt.

I hope Rowling uses the sex fumblings as comic relief. The last book certainly needed more of it.

Thuvia
Print the post Back To Top