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They were doing a demo of "Perfect Food" - a green powder with all kinds of green grasses, algae, etc. at WholeFOods the other day, and I bought some(got suckered into buying? ha ha, at least it was on sale). You drink it mixed w/ water or juice, or as a smoothie boost. I have read mixed info on these types of powders. Anyone have opinions one way or the other?

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I have read mixed info on these types of powders. Anyone have opinions one way or the other?


Someone has asked this same question on the Health & Nutrition board not too long ago. As I recall, the upshot of the various info items posted is that it provides very little of value. I don't remember if it was a separate thread, or buried in something else. You may want to poke around there and see if you can find it.


sheila
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I looked at one of my favorite websites, WholeHealthMD.com to see if they have anything to say about spirulina, etc. Turns out, they do.

http://wholehealthmd.com/refshelf/substances_view/1,1525,10058,00.html

To summarize:

<<Both spirulina and kelp have been touted as miracle cures, capable of melting away arthritis pain, increasing energy, boosting immunity, improving liver function, warding off heart disease and cancer, suppressing AIDS, controlling appetite, and guarding against cell damage from exposure to X rays or heavy metals. Unfortunately, the bottom line is that there's little or no scientific evidence to support most of these claims.

These seaweeds do offer certain health benefits, however. (They)...can constitute a nutritious part of a vegetarian or macrobiotic diet. And specifically, spirulina and kelp may help to control bad breath and treat thyroid problems.>>

The website also notes that they can cause GI upset. And the amount of iodine in large doses can interfere with thyroid medications. Kelp should be avoided by pregnant or breastfeeding women because of its high iodine concentrations.


sheila
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Anyone have opinions one way or the other?

I use it. I like it. I was advised by a naturopath to use it instead of taking multivitamins. I use this one:
http://www.vitacost.com/store/products/ProductSearch.cfm?SearchText=greens&x=18&y=8&SearchBy=PN&ss=1&showbrand=8071

Caat
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I use it. I like it. I was advised by a naturopath to use it instead of taking multivitamins

Same story with me, except I also take a multivitamin. I've noticed an increase in energy and general well-being with it. And it's a quick meal when you're in a hurry.

Abba
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