Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 1
>i> So about tires. As with many here, I need to add air once it gets cold. This year, though, I have one tire that seems to get low roughly every two weeks. I'm going to do that one more time to get through Thanksgiving, but then should probably have it investigated. Any thoughts on cause, things I should look for, etc?


Weather here in wine country of Northern CA is relatively mild, occasionally in the teens, but rarely, so I've never been concerned with pressure changes.. Slow leaks, yes, had them, fixed them, had others fix them over the decades. Could be anything from a valve core failure, to a drywall screw picked up somewhere in my travels.. Tire shops are best equipped to remove, inspect, repair it.. Once off. the interior can be inspected, running a hand around inside might catch where the tip of a nail. drywall screw made it's way inside. A good patch in there is an easy fix, if you could get in there, like they can..

Today, at my age, a swing by the local tire shop handles it, while I wait... I also keep a little 12v compressor in the PU/car, just in case.. Sundays seem to be impossible to find any sort of tire repair shop open, service stations have vanished as fat as auto services.. That's where I began, so many years ago, part time at a friend's Signal one bay station. 3 or 4 of us young guys backed up the owner, Oscar, RIP. Good times..
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
If you live in climates where winter means cold weather, I suggest checking your tire pressures for the season.

First cool day of fall (sub-45/50?) on the coast of South Carolina, my Low Tire Pressure warning lights up. Beings how my car is almost 12 years old and just a low-end model Honda CR-V, it doesn't indicate which tire(s) so I go to the place where I bought them, they check all tires and air up the one(s) that need it. I don't have to wait, even if they're busy. I was missing 2 valve covers this year, which they replaced.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
like clockwork, my TPMS lights fired up yesterday (first cold day of the season)

Unfortunately, the dealership decided (for me) that my leased car 'needed' nitrogen in the tires, so I cant use my compressor to fill it
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
Unfortunately, the dealership decided (for me) that my leased car 'needed' nitrogen in the tires, so I cant use my compressor to fill it

Regular air goes in my nitrogen filled tires just fine.

PSU
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Unfortunately, the dealership decided (for me) that my leased car 'needed' nitrogen in the tires, so I cant use my compressor to fill it

Why not? The air in the atmosphere is about 70% nitrogen. How will they know if you fill your own tires? What will be the consequences for you?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Generally I find a deal at Costco for set of 4 Bridgestones, used to be Michelins, but they showed cracking, my mechanic tipped me off that he saw a lot of that, suggested Bridgestones and that's where I am, Nitrogen filled, green caps. If needed here at home, no problem, whether trailer, bicycle, wheelbarrow, they all get air from whatever compressor is handiest. At his shop, he had an air dryer, so there it at least lost the normal moisture.

It's not worth the time, trip, to run by the Costco Tire shop for nitrogen...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Generally I find a deal at Costco for set of 4 Bridgestones, used to be Michelins, but they showed cracking, my mechanic tipped me off that he saw a lot of that, suggested Bridgestones and that's where I am, Nitrogen filled, green caps. If needed here at home, no problem, whether trailer, bicycle, wheelbarrow, they all get air from whatever compressor is handiest. At his shop, he had an air dryer, so there it at least lost the normal moisture.

I hope he showed cracking on the inside of a tire. If he did, why would they only crack on the inside?

PSU
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
O2 molecules are a bit smaller than N2 molecules. So, the oxygen in air-inflated tires will leak out slightly faster than nitrogen. The end result is that over time the gas mixture becomes nitrogen-dominated.

The major issue with air-inflated tires is moisture in the air compressor tank. My compressor has a dessicant filter right next to the tank, so the whole tank stays dry. My portable air can also has some dessicant beads in it just in case I have to fill it from another source. If you have a compressor, I recommend adding a dessicant filter to it.

Neil
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I hope he showed cracking on the inside of a tire. If he did, why would they only crack on the inside?


No, not inside, but age cracking on the outside, rubber failing, even though there was still decent tread on the tire. I could have ignored it, likely been OK, but the last think I want is tire problems on my F150 whether towing or just poking around..

Thinking back, way back, my commuter car was a '70 Ford Maverick, bought it new, ate up the OEM tires, then put Michelin steel belted tires on it.. With it's original 6 cylinder, stick, it was a great commuter car.. Tires seemed to last forever, it stayed in alignment, I think I put nearly 300K miles on it over the years.. But, One day, this was before I knew my favorite mechanic, I did all the maintenance.. Tread was fine, but as I wiped mu hand over the tire, I was jabbed by the steel belting where it had gotten exposed along the edges, because those Michelin's age out and cracked enough to expose the steel belting! I replaced them at that point, still liked them..

So, years later, I popped for a set of Michelins on the '06 F150... and at the last service I had done before my guy retired, he spotted the cracking.. I think it's Michelin's rubber formulation, while it withstands rolling wear well, they don't hold up to old father time so well... So Bridgestone's it is, for me, likely for my forever!

At Costco, when I replaced them, the tire shop guy came out, to make sure I really wanted to change them, he only saw the remaining tread, not the cracking, I guess...

weco
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
No, not inside, but age cracking on the outside, rubber failing, even though there was still decent tread on the tire. I could have ignored it, likely been OK, but the last think I want is tire problems on my F150 whether towing or just poking around..

I thought you were talking about cracking with regards to the discussion about nitrogen. I don't know how many times I've heard someone say nitrogen in the tires will keep them from cracking. They sometimes get a puzzled look when I say their tires are exposed to air.

As for Michelin tires, that is all I buy. I have never had to replace tires due to cracking. I drive enough miles to wear the tread down before age is ever a factor. Michelin tires have always lasted longer for me. They're one of the few tires on the market with full depth sipes. Other major brands have half-depth sipes so once the tire tread is half-worn, a good bit of traction is lost.


PSU
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I really liked Michelin's for decades, where prior to that '70 maverick commuter, I'd grab whatever I could afford, once I could afford new tires, rather that recaps.. Radials over bias ply, they really were great, but IU'm here on the West Coast, mild weather, no snow, and those were at times long commutes, 80 miles each way, daily runs across the GG Bridge, out before sunrise, home pretty late.. Never had one fail, or blow. Sometime in there, their proaction changed, maybe a new US plant? But I heard there were changes.

Along the way as I bought a new F250, I went to All Steel radials, even the sidewalls, as my job changed a bit, more literal field worksites, and had talked with oil/gas rig workers, and they had talked of those all steel tires, so when the chance came along I hopped aboard. Those tires outlasted me, I traded that truck off long before they were worn so far as to need replacing..

Along that same time frame I found, got to know Alex, my mechanic, over time we shared interests in technologies, chasing, with him sharing tons of insights into all phases of my vehicles. So total was my trust I would have gladly given him a blank check for his services if he would have even accepted it. So his views on the tires were listened, accepted, for he had seen first hand, not only my vehicles, but all that came through his little shop. He, like us are retired now, I had to find a new auto repair shop, and while they do good work, it's not the same..

Anyway, maybe a bit more on why I switched.. Pricing is similar, Costco sales deals are similar, if the timing is right.

As far as nitrogen, I can see some of the reasons for racers, where precise control is vital, but my commuter days are gone, dry air is fine, I should add a dryer on my garage compressor, but I rarely need to add air, if I do, it's more likely a nail or valve core failure, a local tire shop handles it... Costco is 10 miles up the road.. Service Stations are long gone... My early job was part time, or just hangin' out in a local fast Station. Pete's Signal.. Great friend, the owner was a kick to 'work' for, have a few beers with, run errands for, borrow his truck, work on my $25 '41 Ford, call for help, or help him or family to move, all night dance parties, tons of fun of the '60s... Back then we knew all the other shops, dealers, station owners around town, who were the good guys, who to be careful with.. All are gone today, new generations, new technologies...

weco
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
No, not inside, but age cracking on the outside, rubber failing, even though there was still decent tread on the tire. I could have ignored it, likely been OK, but the last think I want is tire problems on my F150 whether towing or just poking around.

Tire rubber doesn't last forever. Exposure to air and UV will cause the rubber in tires to break down over time, even if there's plenty of tread left. I replaced an old set of Michelins this summer on my daughter's ancient and honorable CR-V for this very reason. The central Texas sun is not kind to tires.

I've been a dedicated Michelin Man (*) for most of my life. Bridgestone is a good tire, too. And you're right: you don't want tire problems. This is the one part where I go for premium replacement parts because it's the one part of the car that touches the road.

Regards,

- HCF

(*) I look more and more like the Michelin Man as the years go by!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
So about tires. As with many here, I need to add air once it gets cold. This year, though, I have one tire that seems to get low roughly every two weeks. I'm going to do that one more time to get through Thanksgiving, but then should probably have it investigated. Any thoughts on cause, things I should look for, etc?

ThyPeace, always buys the 100k tires once the OEM wears out. I just turned over 140k miles on the car, so the obvious is just that it's time to replace them. The car needs to last until the kid graduates from high school because of her OCD. (It's complicated.) That's only 18 months from now, so I may go with slightly less rugged tires this time.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
>i> So about tires. As with many here, I need to add air once it gets cold. This year, though, I have one tire that seems to get low roughly every two weeks. I'm going to do that one more time to get through Thanksgiving, but then should probably have it investigated. Any thoughts on cause, things I should look for, etc?


Weather here in wine country of Northern CA is relatively mild, occasionally in the teens, but rarely, so I've never been concerned with pressure changes.. Slow leaks, yes, had them, fixed them, had others fix them over the decades. Could be anything from a valve core failure, to a drywall screw picked up somewhere in my travels.. Tire shops are best equipped to remove, inspect, repair it.. Once off. the interior can be inspected, running a hand around inside might catch where the tip of a nail. drywall screw made it's way inside. A good patch in there is an easy fix, if you could get in there, like they can..

Today, at my age, a swing by the local tire shop handles it, while I wait... I also keep a little 12v compressor in the PU/car, just in case.. Sundays seem to be impossible to find any sort of tire repair shop open, service stations have vanished as fat as auto services.. That's where I began, so many years ago, part time at a friend's Signal one bay station. 3 or 4 of us young guys backed up the owner, Oscar, RIP. Good times..
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
If you live in climates where winter means cold weather, I suggest checking your tire pressures for the season.


I suggest checking them weekly all year long. It only takes a couple of minutes.

xtn
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Unfortunately, the dealership decided (for me) that my leased car 'needed' nitrogen in the tires, so I cant use my compressor to fill it


Um...yes you can. Nitrogen and air can coexist. In fact, air is like 70% Nitrogen anyway.

xtn
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
This year, though, I have one tire that seems to get low roughly every two weeks. I'm going to do that one more time to get through Thanksgiving, but then should probably have it investigated. Any thoughts on cause, things I should look for, etc?


A leak.

xtn
Print the post Back To Top